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Is Riverside Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 5:09 am, December 11, 2021
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Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Riverside?

Yes, Riverside's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Riverside has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. For the latest updates on Riverside water, please check out its Twitter page

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from Oct. 31, 2018 to Dec. 31, 2021, Riverside's water utility, City of Riverside, had 0 violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. This assessment is based on the City of Riverside water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for Riverside Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in Riverside tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in Riverside's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

Riverside Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named City of Riverside for Riverside in California. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

Is there Lead in Riverside Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Riverside water system, City of Riverside, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.0 mg/L of lead in Riverside water. This is 0% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Riverside contained more lead.

While Riverside water testing may have found 0.0 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Riverside Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be at least one military base - March Air Force Base - near Riverside with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Riverside has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
show details
Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
show details
Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
show details
Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
show details
Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
show details

For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Riverside Water - Frequently Asked Questions

HOW DO I CONTACT RIVERSIDE CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Riverside water provider, City of Riverside, please use the information below.
By Phone: 951-826-5772
By Email: tcorbin@riversideca.gov
By Mail: 3750 University Ave
5th Floor
RIVERSIDE, CA, 92501
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR CITY OF RIVERSIDE
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their City of Riverside account to pay their Riverside water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your City of Riverside bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Riverside water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Riverside water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP RIVERSIDE WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Riverside means you will often need to put the water in your name with City of Riverside. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Riverside means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with City of Riverside. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

Is Riverside Tap Water Safe to Drink? Tap water & safety quality

The estimated price of bottled water

$2.33 in USD (1.5-liter)

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Riverside tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 43% Moderate
  • Water Pollution 48% Moderate
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 57% Moderate
  • Water Quality 52% Moderate

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Riverside, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Riverside Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from Riverside's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

WATER QUALITY REPORT

2020

WATER RESOURCES

RPU met all of its water supply needs in 2020 by utilizing groundwater sources located in the Bunker Hill and Riverside Basins. RPU directly treats some of its wells and blends all water sources at a central location before entering into distribution.

All data provided are from samples collected in the distribution system or at the entry point to the system:

Transmission

Pipelines

Distribution

Pipelines

Reservoirs

Booster Stations

Treatment

Plants

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES: 2020 WATER SAMPLING DATA

We are pleased to report that our water met or surpassed all state and federal drinking water quality standards in 2020.

6,200 - Samples collected to test for bacteria.

13,000 - Samples collected for source and system compliance and monitoring.

$

Approximately $632,000 - Spent

on compliance laboratory costs.

10,000 - Samples collected for treatment plant compliance and monitoring.

29,200 - Total samples collected.

State certified independent laboratories perform water tests

Riverside Public Utilities tests for more than 200 regulated and unregulated contaminants in our water system as required by state and federal regulations. This report provides data from sampling conducted in calendar year 2020. Only those contaminants detected in our water system are listed here. The state allows us to monitor for

some contaminants less than once per year because concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old. For a listing of additional chemical tests, please contact our Water Quality Division at (951) 351-6370.

This report contains important information about your drinking water. Translate it or speak with someone who understands it.

 

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RiversidePublicUtilities.com • (951) 351-6370 • 3750 University Ave., 3rd Floor • Riverside, CA 92501

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES 2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

P R I M A R Y S T A N D A R D S : M A N D A T O R Y

H E A L T H - R E L A T E D S T A N D A R D S

CONTAMINANT

STATE MCL

STATE PHG

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES

AVERAGE

RANGE

SOURCES IN DRINKING

WATER

MICROBIOLOGICAL

Total Coliform (P/A) (a)

CLARITY

Turbidity (John W. North Treatment Plant)

REGULATED ORGANIC

Total Trihalomethanes “TTHMs”

Chlorine

REGULATED INORGANIC

Arsenic

Fluoride

Nitrate (as nitrogen, N)

Perchlorate

RADIOLOGICAL

Uranium

Radium 228

LEAD/COPPER (AL)

(90% Household Tap)

Copper (b)

>5%

TT

  1. ppb

4.0 ppm as Cl2 (MRDL)

  1. ppb

2 ppm 10 ppm 6 ppb 20 pCi/L 5 pCi/L

1300 ppb

0 (MCLG)

NS

NS

4.0 ppm as Cl2 (MRDLG)

  1. ppt

1 ppm

  1. ppm

1 ppb

0.43 pCi/L

0.019 pCi/L

300 ppb

0.26%

 

0 - 1%

0.1 NTU

100% Meeting

(Highest)

turbidity limits

5.3 ppb

1.1 - 6.3 ppb

0.62 ppm

0.22

- 0.93 ppm

1.4 ppb

0 - 3.6 ppb

0.47 ppm

0.39

- 0.54 ppm

5.3 ppm

3.9

- 6.7 ppm

ND

 

ND

6.4 pCi/L

4.3 - 8.5 pCi/L

0.98 pCi/L

ND - 2.4 pCi/L

440 ppb

ND - 840 ppb

 

RIVERSIDE

Naturally present in

environment

Soil runoff

By-product of drinking

water disinfection

Naturally present in

environment

Erosion of natural deposits

Naturally present in

environment

Naturally present in

environment

Inorganic chemical used

in variety of industrial

operatives

Erosion of natural deposits

Erosion of natural deposits

Internal corrosion of home

plumbing

UNREGULATED CHEMICALS

Chlorodibromoacetic acid Germanium (total) Perfluorooctanesulfonic sulfonate (PFOS)

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)

Perfluorobutanesulfonic acid (PFBS) Perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS) Perfluorohexanoic Acid (PFHxA)

NOTIFICATION LEVEL

NS

NS

  1. ppt
  1. ppt

500 ppt

NS NS

AVERAGE

RANGE

0.08 ppb

ND - 0.33 ppb

0.28 ppb

ND - 0.44 ppb

5.4 ppt

3.7 - 6.4 ppt

4.1 ppt

3.2 - 4.5 ppt

3.4 ppt

2.7 - 4 ppt

4.0 ppt

2.9 - 5.5 ppt

4.7 ppt

4.3 - 5.2 ppt

2019 UCMR4 Data

2019 UCMR4 Data

SECONDARY STANDARDS AESTHETIC STANDARDS

 

STATE

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES

SOURCES IN

 

STATE

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES

SOURCES IN

 

MCL

AVERAGE

RANGE

DRINKING

 

MCL

AVERAGE

RANGE

DRINKING

 

WATER

 

WATER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naturally

Alkalinity

 

 

140 - 170

Naturally

Chloride

500 ppm

36 ppm

33 - 39 ppm

present in

NS

162 ppm

present in

(CaCO3)

ppm

 

 

 

 

environment

 

 

environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naturally

 

 

 

 

Naturally

Sulfate

500 ppm

71 ppm

67 - 76 ppm

present in

Sodium

NS

43 ppm

40 - 44 ppm

present in

 

 

 

 

environment

 

 

 

 

environment

Total Dissolved

1000

 

290 - 390

Naturally

 

 

 

 

Naturally

361 ppm

present in

Calcium

NS

65 ppm

61 - 69 ppm

present in

Solids "TDS"

ppm

ppm

 

environment

 

 

 

 

environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specific

1600

581

560 - 640

Substances

 

 

 

 

Naturally

μmho/

μmho/

form ions in

Potassium

NS

3 ppm

2.7 - 3.3 ppm

present in

Conductance

μmho/cm

cm

cm

water

 

 

 

 

environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naturally

 

 

 

 

Naturally

pH Units

NS

8.2 Units

6.9 - 10 Units

present in

Magnesium

NS

9 ppm

8 - 10 ppm

present in

 

 

 

 

environment

 

 

 

 

environment

Hardness

 

202 ppm

190 - 210

Naturally

 

 

 

 

Naturally

NS

present in

Turbidity

5 NTU

0.11 NTU

0 - 0.29 NTU

present in

(CaCO3)

(11 gpg)

ppm

 

environment

 

 

 

 

environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An important message about drinking

water sources from the US EPA

The sources of drinking water (both tap water andbottledwater)includerivers,lakes,streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals, and in some cases radioactive materials, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, that can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. Pesticides and Herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources, such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems. Radioactive Contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Regulations: In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. State Board regulations also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

Important Health Information: Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons, such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly people, and infants, can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. USEPA/ Center for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hot Line. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1(800) 426-4791.

Water Sources: Riverside obtains its water supply from groundwater stored in the Bunker Hill and Riverside groundwater basins. An assessment of these drinking water sources for the City of Riverside was completed in May 2013. These sources are considered most vulnerable to historical contamination from industrial and agricultural operations.

A copy of the complete assessment is available at State Board District Office, 1350 Front Street, Room 2050, San Diego, CA 92101 or at Riverside Public Utilities (RPU) offices at 3750 University Ave. 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA 92501. You may request a summary of the assessment be sent to you by contacting the State Board district engineer or a RPU water system representative at (951) 351-6370.

Definitions

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs (or MCLGs) as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCLs are set to protect the odor, taste, and appearance of drinking water.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

Public Health Goal (PHG) The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected health risk. PHGs are set by the California EPA.

Regulatory Action Level (AL) The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS) MCLs and MRDL’s for contaminants that affect health, along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Millirem (mrem) is a unit used to account for various radiations that have an effect on humans.

Parts Per Million (ppm) One part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or one penny in $10,000.

Treatment Technique (TT) A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Parts Per Billion (ppb) One part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years or one penny in $10,000,000.

Parts Per Trillion (ppt) One part per trillion corresponds to one minute in two million years or one penny in $10,000,000,000.

Picocuries Per Liter (pCi/L) A measure of the radioactivity in water.

Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) A measure of suspended material in water.

Micromhos (μMHOS) A measure of conductivity (electric current) in water.

UCMR4 Fourth Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule NL Notification level

ND Not detected at the detection limit for reporting. NS No standard.

GPG Grains per gallon of hardness (1 gpg = 17.1 ppm).

  • Less than the detectable levels.
  1. Results of all samples collected from the distribution system during any month shall be free of total coliforms in 95% or more of the monthly samples. This Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) reflects changes in drinking water regulatory requirements during 2016. All water systems are required to comply with the state Total Coliform Rule. Beginning April 1, 2016, all water systems are also required to comply with the federal revised Total Coliform Rule. The new federal rule maintains the purpose to protect public health by ensuring

the integrity of the drinking water distribution system and monitoring for the presence of microbials (i.e., total coliform and E. coli bacteria). The U.S. EPA anticipates greater public health protection as the new rule requires water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems. Water systems that exceed a specified frequency of total coliform occurrences are required to conduct an assessment to determine if any sanitary defects exist. If found these must be corrected by the water system.

  1. The Lead and Copper Rule requires that 90 percent of samples taken from drinking water taps in the program homes must be below the action levels. Monitoring is required every 3 years. In 2019, 51 homes participated in the monitoring program. No lead was detected in the 90th percentile samples. The average value listed for copper is the 90th percentile result. No home exceeded the action level for either lead or copper. The next monitoring program is scheduled for 2022. In 2019, one school has requested lead sampling. From 2017-2019, RPU has tested all required schools.

Additional Regulatory Information

Fluoride - The State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) has established an “optimal” fluoride level for water at 1 ppm. Riverside has naturally occurring fluoride levels at 0.47 ppm and is not planning to add fluoride to its water by artificial means.

Lead - If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Riverside Public Utilities is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at EPA.gov/SafeWater/Lead.

Nitrate - Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. Such nitrate levels in drinking water can interfere with the capacity of an infant’s blood to carry oxygen, resulting in a serious illness; symptoms include shortness of breath and blueness of the skin. Nitrate levels above 10 ppm may also affect the ability of the blood to carry oxygen in other individuals, such as pregnant women and those with certain specific enzyme deficiencies. If you are caring for an infant or you are pregnant, you should ask advice about nitrate levels from your health care provider.

Riverside provides drinking water that on average is at 5.3 ppm and has a range from 3.9 ppm to 6.7 ppm during the year. The State Board has set the MCL for nitrate at 10 ppm. Riverside has 50 wells that are blended to comply with drinking water standards. The city conducts extensive monitoring of the blend operations. Seasonal variation in demand and flow, in addition to system maintenance and repair, impact the nitrate levels during the year.

Perchlorate - Perchlorate is a regulated drinking water contaminant in California. The maximum contaminant level for perchlorate is 6 parts per billion. Perchlorate salts were used in solid rocket propellants and other industrial applications.

Turbidity - A measure of the cloudiness of the water. Turbidity is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system.

Monitoring Unregulated Contaminants

This monitoring helps USEPA to determine where certain contaminants occur and whether the contaminants need to be regulated. Data is available at EPA.gov/dwucmr.

INFORME SOBRE LA CALIDAD DEL AGUA

2020

RECURSOS HIDRÁULICOS

RPU satisfizo todas sus necesidades de suministro de agua en 2020 mediante la utilización de fuentes de agua subterránea ubicadas en las Cuencas de Bunker Hill y Riverside. RPU trata directamente algunos de sus pozos y mezcla todas las fuentes de agua en un lugar central antes de entrar en distribución.

Todos los datos proporcionados proceden de muestras recogidas en el sistema de distribución o en el punto de entrada al sistema:

Tuberías de Transmisión

Tuberías de Distribución

Tanques

Estaciones de

Refuerzo

Plantas de

Tratamiento

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES: 2020 DATOS DE MUESTREO DEL AGUA

Nos complace informar que nuestra agua cumplió o superó todos los estándares estatales y federales de calidad del agua potable en 2020.

6,200 - Muestras recogidas para detectar bacterias.

13,000 - Muestras recogidas para el cumplimiento y seguimiento de fuentes y sistemas.

$

Aproximadamente $632,000 -

Invertidos en costos de laboratorio

 

para el cumpliemiento.

10,000 - Muestras recogidas para el cumplimiento y seguimiento de las plantas de tratamiento.

29,200 - Total de muestras recogidas.

Laboratorios independientes certificados por el estado realizan las pruebas del agua

Riverside Public Utilities hace pruebas para más de 200 contaminantes regulados y no regulados en nuestro sistema de agua según lo requieren las normativas estatales y federales. Este informe proporciona datos de muestreo realizado en el año calendario 2020. Solamente esos contaminantes detectados en nuestro sistema de agua se enumeran aquí. El estado nos permite monitorear algunos contaminantes menos

de una vez al año porque las concentraciones de estos contaminantes no cambian con frecuencia. Algunos de nuestros datos, aunque representativos, tienen más de un año de antigüedad. Para obtener una lista de pruebas químicas adicionales, póngase en contacto con nuestra División de Calidad del Agua al

(951) 351-6370.

Este reporte contiene información importante acerca de su agua potable. Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda.

 

ESPAÑOL

 

CHINO

 

JAPONÉS

Este reporte contiene información muy importante sobre su

 

 

 

 

agua potable. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo

 

 

 

 

entienda bien. Para más información por favor llame

 

 

 

(951) 351-6370.

 

VIETNAMITA

 

 

 

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RiversidePublicUtilities.com • (951) 351-6370 • 3750 University Ave., 3rd Floor • Riverside, CA 92501

INFORME SOBRE LA CALIDAD DEL AGUA DE RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES 2020

NORMAS PRIMARIAS: NORMAS OBLIGATORIAS RELACIONADAS CON LA SALUD

CONTAMINANTE

MICROBIOLÓGICO

Coliforme total (P/A) (a)

CLARIDAD

Turbidez (John W. North Treatment Plant)

ORGÁNICO REGULADO

Total Trihalometanos “TTHMs”

Cloro

REGULADO INORGÁNICO

Arsénico

Fluoruro

Nitrato (como nitrógeno, N)

Perclorato

RADIOLÓGICO

Uranio

Radio 228

PLOMO/COBRE (AL) (90% Grifo del Hogar)

Cobre (b)

MCL DEL

ESTADO

>5%

TT

  1. ppb

4.0 ppm como Cl2 (MRDL)

  1. ppb

2 ppm

10 ppm

6 ppb

20 pCi/L

5 pCi/L

1300 ppb

PHG DEL

ESTADO

0 (MCLG)

NS

NS

4.0 ppm como Cl2 (MRDLG

  1. ppt

1 ppm

  1. ppm

1 ppb

0.43 pCi/L

0.019 pCi/L

300 ppb

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES

PROMEDIO RANGO

0.26%

0 - 1%

0.1 NTU

Límites de Turbidez

(Más Alto)

del 100%

5.3 ppb

1.1 - 6.3 ppb

0.62 ppm

0.22 - 0.93 ppm

1.4 ppb

0 - 3.6 ppb

0.47 ppm

0.39 - 0.54 ppm

5.3 ppm

3.9 - 6.7 ppm

ND

ND

6.4 pCi/L

4.3 - 8.5 pCi/L

0.98 pCi/L

ND - 2.4 pCi/L

440 ppb

ND - 840 ppb

 

RIVERSIDE

FUENTES EN EL AGUA POTABLE

Naturalmente presente en el

medio ambiente

Escorrentía de suelo

Subproducto de la desinfección

del agua potable

Naturalmente presente en el

medio ambiente

Erosión de los depósitos naturales

Naturalmente presente en

el medio ambiente

Naturalmente presente en el

medio ambiente

Químico inorgánico utilizado en variedad de operativos industriales

Erosión de los depósitos naturales

Erosión de los depósitos naturales

Corrosión interna de las

tuberías del hogar

PRODUCTOS QUÍMICOS NO REGULADOS

Ácido clorodibromoacético Germanio (total)

Sulfonato perfluorooctanosulfónico (PFOS)

Ácido perfluorooctanoico (PFOA)

Ácido perfluorobutanosulfónico (PFBS) Ácido perfluorohexanosulfónico (PFHxS) Ácido perfluorohexanoico (PFHxA)

NIVEL DE NOTIFICACIÓN

NS

NS

  1. ppt
  1. ppt

500 ppt

NS NS

PROMEDIO

RANGO

0.08 ppb

ND - 0.33 ppb

0.28 ppb

ND - 0.44 ppb

5.4 ppt

3.7 - 6.4 ppt

4.1 ppt

3.2 - 4.5 ppt

3.4 ppt

2.7 - 4 ppt

4.0 ppt

2.9 - 5.5 ppt

4.7 ppt

4.3 - 5.2 ppt

Datos de UCMR4 2019 Datos de UCMR4 2019

NORMAS SECUNDARIAS NORMAS ESTÉTICAS

 

MCL

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES

FUENTES EN EL

 

MCL

RIVERSIDE PUBLIC UTILITIES

FUENTES EN EL

 

ESTATAL

PROMEDIO

RANGO

AGUA POTABLE

 

ESTATAL

PROMEDIO

RANGO

AGUA POTABLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naturalmente

Alcalinidad

 

162 ppm

140 - 170

Naturalmente

Cloruro

500 ppm

36 ppm

33 - 39 ppm

presente en el

NS

presente en el

(CaCO3)

ppm

 

 

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sulfato

500 ppm

71 ppm

67 - 76 ppm

Naturalmente

Sodio

NS

43 ppm

40 - 44 ppm

Naturalmente

presente en el

presente en el

 

 

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

medio ambiente

Sólidos Disueltos

 

 

290 - 390

Naturalmente

 

 

 

 

Naturalmente

1000 ppm

361 ppm

presente en el

Calcio

NS

65 ppm

61 - 69 ppm

presente en el

Totales “TDS”

ppm

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conductancia

1600

581

560 - 640

Las sustancias

 

 

 

 

Naturalmente

μmho/

forman iones en

Potasio

NS

3 ppm

2.7 - 3.3 ppm

presente en el

Específica

μmho/cm

μmho/cm

cm

el agua

 

 

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.2

6.9 - 10

Naturalmente

 

 

 

 

Naturalmente

Unidades de pH

NS

presente en el

Magnesio

NS

9 ppm

8 - 10 ppm

presente en el

Unidades

Unidades

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dureza

 

202 ppm

190 - 210

Naturalmente

 

 

 

 

Naturalmente

NS

presente en el

Turbidez

5 NTU

0.11 NTU

0 - 0.29 NTU

presente en el

(CaCO3)

(11 gpg)

ppm

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

medio ambiente

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Un mensaje importante sobre las fuentes de

agua potable de la EPA de EE.UU.

Las fuentes de agua potable (tanto agua del grifo como agua embotellada) incluyen ríos, lagos, arroyos, estanques, embalses, manantiales y pozos. A medida que el agua viaja sobre la superficie de la tierra o a través del suelo, disuelve minerales naturales, y en algunos casos materiales radiactivos, y puede recoger sustancias resultantes de la presencia de animales o actividad humana. Los contaminantes que pueden estar presentes en el agua de origen incluyen: Contaminantes Microbianos, como virus y bacterias, que pueden provenir de plantas de tratamiento de aguas residuales, sistemas sépticos, operaciones ganaderas agrícolas y vida silvestre. Contaminantes Inorgánicos, como sales y metales, que pueden ocurrir naturalmente o resultar de escorrentías urbanas de aguas pluviales, descargas de aguas residuales industriales o domésticas, producción de petróleo y gas, minería o explotación agrícola. Pesticidas y Herbicidas, que pueden provenir de una variedad de fuentes, como la agricultura, la escorrentía de aguas pluviales urbanas y los usos residenciales. Contaminantes Químicos Orgánicos, incluidos los productos químicos orgánicos sintéticos y volátiles, que son productos electrónicos de los procesos industriales y la producción de petróleo y también pueden provenir de estaciones de servicio, escorrentías urbanas de aguas pluviales, aplicaciones agrícolas y sistemas sépticos. Contaminantes Radiactivos, que pueden producirse naturalmente en o ser el resultado de las actividades de producción y minería de petróleo y gas.

Reglamentos: Con el fin de garantizar que el agua del grifo sea segura para beber, la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de los Estados Unidos (USEPA) y la Junta Estatal de Control de Recursos Hidráulicos (Junta Estatal) prescriben regulaciones que limitan la cantidad de ciertos contaminantes en el agua proporcionada por los sistemas públicos de agua. Las regulaciones de la Junta de Estado también establecen límites para los contaminantes en el agua embotellada que deben proporcionar la misma protección para la salud pública.

Información Importante sobre la Salud: Algunas personas pueden ser más vulnerables a los contaminantes en el agua potable que la población general. Las personas inmunodeprimidas, como las personas con cáncer sometidas a quimioterapia, las personas que se han sometido a trasplantes de órganos, las personas con VIH/SIDA u otros trastornos del sistema inmunitario, algunas personas mayores y los bebés, pueden estar particularmente en riesgo de infecciones. Estas personas deben buscar consejo sobre el agua potable de sus proveedores de atención médica. Directrices de USEPA/Centro para el Control de Enfermedades (CDC) sobre los medios apropiados para disminuir el riesgo de infección por Cryptosporidium y otros contaminantes microbianos están disponibles en la Línea Directa de Agua Potable Segura. Es razonable esperar que el agua potable, incluida el agua embotellada, contenga al menos pequeñas cantidades de algunos contaminantes. La presencia de contaminantes no indica necesariamente que el agua represente un riesgo para la salud. Puede obtenerse más información sobre contaminantes y posibles efectos sobre la salud llamando a la Línea Directa de Agua Potable Segura de la USEPA al 1(800) 426-4791.

Fuentes de Agua: Riverside obtiene su suministro de agua de las aguas subterráneas almacenadas en las cuencas de agua subterránea de Bunker Hill y Riverside. Una evaluación de estas fuentes de agua potable para la Ciudad de Riverside se completó en mayo de 2013. Estas fuentes se consideran las más vulnerables a la contaminación histórica de las operaciones industriales y agrícolas.

Una copia de la evaluación completa está disponible en la Oficina de Distrito de la Junta Estatal, 1350 Front Street, Sala 2050, San Diego, CA 92101 o en

las oficinas de Riverside Public Utilities (RPU) en 3750 University Ave. 3er Piso, Riverside, CA 92501. Puede solicitar que se le envíe un resumen de la evaluación poniéndose en contacto con el Representante del sistema de agua RPU al (951) 351-6370.

Definiciones

Nivel Máximo de Contaminantes (MCL) El nivel más alto de un contaminante permitido en el agua potable. Los MCL primarios se establecen tan cerca de los PHGs (o los MCLGs) como es económica y tecnológicamente factible. Los MCLs secundarios están configurados para proteger el olor, el sabor y la apariencia del agua potable.

Meta de Nivel Máximo de Contaminantes (MCLG) El nivel de un contaminante en el agua potable por debajo del cual no se conoce ni se espera riesgo para la salud. Los MCLGs son establecidos por la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de los Estados Unidos (USEPA).

Meta de Salud Pública (PHG) El nivel de un contaminante en el agua potable por debajo del cual no hay riesgo conocido o esperado para la salud. Los PHGs son establecidos por la EPA de California.

Nivel de Acción Regulatoria (AL) La concentración de un contaminante que, si se supera, desencadena el tratamiento u otros requisitos que debe seguir un sistema de agua.

Estándar Primario de Agua Potable (PDWS) MCLs y MRDLs para contaminantes que afectan la salud, junto con sus requisitos de monitoreo e informes, y requisitos de tratamiento de agua.

Nivel Máximo de Desinfectante Residual (MRDL) El nivel más alto de desinfectante permitido en el agua potable. Hay pruebas convincentes de que la adición de un desinfectante es necesaria para el control de contaminantes microbianos.

Meta del Nivel Máximo de Desinfectante Residual (MRDLG) El nivel de desinfectante de agua potable por debajo del cual no se conoce ni se espera riesgo para la salud. Los MRDLGs no reflejan los beneficios del uso de desinfectantes para controlar contaminantes microbianos.

Milirem (mrem) es una unidad utilizada para dar cuenta de varias radiaciones que tienen un efecto en los seres humanos.

Partes Por Millón (ppm) Una parte por millón corresponde a un minuto en dos años o un centavo en $10,000.

Técnica de Tratamiento (TT) Un proceso necesario destinado a reducir el nivel de un contaminante en el agua potable.

Partes Por Mil Millones (ppb) Una parte por mil millones corresponde a un minuto en 2,000 años o un centavo en $10,000,000.

Partes Por Billón (ppt) Una parte por billón corresponde a un minuto en dos millones de años o un centavo en $10,000,000,000.

Picocuries Por Litro (pCi/L) Una medida de la radiactividad en el agua.

Unidades de Turbidez Nefelométricas (NTU) Una medida de material suspendido en el agua.

Micromhos (μMHOS) Una medida de conductividad (corriente eléctrica) en el agua.

UCMR4 Cuarta Regla de Monitoreo de Contaminantes No Regulados NL Nivel de notificación

ND No detectado en el límite de detección para la generación de informes

NS Sin estándar.

GPG Granos por galón de dureza (1 gpg = 17.1 ppm).

  • Menos que los niveles detectables.
  1. Los resultados de todas las muestras recogidas del sistema de distribución durante cualquier mes estarán libres de coliformes totales en el 95% o más de las muestras mensuales. Este Informe de
    Confianza del Consumidor (CCR) refleja los cambios en los requisitos reglamentarios de agua potable durante 2016. Todos los sistemas de agua están obligados a cumplir con la Regla de Coliformes Totales del estado a partir del 1 de abril de 2016, todos los sistemas de agua también están obligados a cumplir con la Regla federal revisada de Coliformes Totales. La nueva norma federal mantiene el propósito de proteger la salud pública la integridad del sistema de distribución de

agua potable y el monitoreo de la presencia de microbianos (p.ej., el total de bacterias coliformes y E. coli). La EPA estadounidense prevé una mayor protección de la salud mayor protección de la salud pública, ya que la nueva regla requiere sistemas de agua que sean vulnerables a la contaminación microbiana para identificar y solucionar problemas. Los sistemas de agua que exceden una frecuencia especificada de ocurrencias coliformes totales están obligados a realizar una evaluación para determinar si existen defectos sanitarios. Si se encuentran estos deben ser corregidos por el sistema de agua

  1. La Regla de Plomo y Cobre requiere que el 90 por ciento de las muestras tomadas de grifos de agua potable en los hogares del programa deben estar por debajo de los niveles de acción. Se requiere monitoreo cada 3 años. En 2019, 51 hogares participaron en el programa de monitoreo. No se detectó plomo en las muestras de percentil 90. El valor promedio indicado para el cobre es el resultado del percentil 90. Ninguna casa superó el nivel de acción ni para el plomo ni para el cobre. El próximo programa de monitoreo está programado para 2022. En 2019, una escuela ha solicitado muestreo de plomo. De 2017 a 2019, RPU ha probado todas las escuelas requeridas.

Información regulatoria adicional

Fluoruro - La Junta Estatal de Control de Recursos Hidráulicos (Junta) ha establecido un nivel de fluoruro “óptimo” para el agua a 1 ppm. Riverside tiene niveles naturales de fluoruro en 0.47 ppm y no está planeando añadir fluoruro a su agua por medios artificiales.

Plomo - Si está presente, los niveles elevados de plomo pueden causar serios problemas de salud, especialmente para las mujeres embarazadas y los niños pequeños. El plomo en el agua potable proviene principalmente de materiales y componentes asociados con las líneas de servicio y las tuberías domésticas. Riverside Public Utilities es responsable de proporcionar agua potable de alta calidad, pero no puede controlar la variedad de materiales utilizados en los componentes de plomería. Cuando el agua ha estado asentada durante varias horas, usted puede minimizar el potencial de exposición al plomo enjuagando el grifo durante 30 segundos a dos minutos antes de usar agua para beber o cocinar. Si le preocupa el plomo en el agua, es posible que desee que le prueben el agua. La información sobre el plomo en el agua potable, los métodos de prueba y los pasos que puede tomar para minimizar la exposición está disponible en la Línea Directa de Agua Potable Segura o en EPA.gov/SafeWater/Lead.

Nitrato - El nitrato en agua potable a niveles superiores a 10 ppm es un riesgo para la salud de los bebés de menos de seis meses de edad. Estos niveles de nitrato en el agua potable pueden interferir con la capacidad de la sangre de un bebé para transportar oxígeno, lo que resulta en una enfermedad grave; síntomas incluyen dificultad para respirar y color azulado de la piel. Los niveles de nitrato superiores a 10 ppm también pueden afectar la capacidad de la sangre para transportar oxígeno en otros individuos, como las mujeres embarazadas y aquellos con ciertas deficiencias específicas de enzimas. Si usted está cuidando a un bebé o está embarazada, debería pedir consejo sobre los niveles de nitrato de su proveedor de atención médica.

Riverside proporciona agua potable que en promedio está en 5.3 ppm y tiene un rango de 3.9 ppm a 6.7 ppm durante el año. La Junta del Estado ha fijado el MCL para nitrato en 10 ppm. Riverside tiene 50 pozos que se mezclan para cumplir con las normas de agua potable. La ciudad lleva a cabo un amplio monitoreo de las operaciones de mezcla. La variación estacional de la demanda y el flujo, además del mantenimiento y reparación del sistema, afectan los niveles de nitrato durante el año.

Perclorato - El perclorato es un contaminante regulado del agua potable en California. El nivel máximo de contaminantes para el perclorato es de 6 partes por mil millones. Las sales de perclorato se utilizaron en propulsores de cohetes sólidos y otras aplicaciones industriales.

Turbidez - Una medida de la nubosidad del agua. La turbidez es un buen indicador de la eficacia de nuestro sistema de filtración.

Monitoreo de contaminantes no regulados

Esta supervisión ayuda a USEPA a determinar dónde se producen ciertos contaminantes y si es necesario regular los contaminantes. Los datos están disponibles en EPA.gov/dwucmr.

Contaminants


City of Riverside

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the California State Water Resources Control Board, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 303871
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Groundwater
  • Total: 17

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Arsenic
  • Chromium (hexavalent)
  • Dibromochloromethane
  • Nitrate
  • Nitrate and nitrite
  • Radium%2C combined (-226 & -228)
  • Radon
  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)
  • Uranium

Other Detected Contaminants

  • 1%2C4-Dioxane
  • Bromoform
  • Chlorate
  • Fluoride
  • Molybdenum
  • N-Nitrosodi-N-butylamine
  • Strontium
  • Vanadium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

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