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Is New York Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 4:26 pm, January 29, 2022
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Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in New York?

Yes, New York's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as New York has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. For the latest updates on New York water, please check out its Twitter page

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from Oct. 31, 2018 to Dec. 31, 2021, New York's water utility, New York City System, had 0 violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. The last violation for New York was resolved on Oct. 31, 2012. This assessment is based on the New York City System water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for New York Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in New York tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in New York's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

New York Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named New York City System for New York in New York. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

For the compliance period beginning Feb. 1, 2017, New York had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Treatment Technique Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Treatment Technique Uncovered Reservoir which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Surface Water Treatment Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule.

From Oct. 1, 2012 to Oct. 31, 2012, New York had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Treatment Technique Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Treatment Technique (SWTR and GWR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Surface Water Treatment Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Surface Water Treatment Rule.

From April 1, 2012 to April 30, 2012, New York had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring of Treatment (SWTR-Unfilt/GWR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Surface Water Treatment Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Surface Water Treatment Rule.

From Dec. 1, 2010 to Dec. 31, 2010, New York had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring of Treatment (SWTR-Unfilt/GWR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Surface Water Treatment Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Surface Water Treatment Rule.

Is there Lead in New York Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the New York water system, New York City System, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.011 mg/L of lead in New York water. This is 73.3% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from New York contained more lead.

While New York water testing may have found 0.011 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in New York Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be at least one military base - BETHPAGE NY NWIRP - near New York with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if New York has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

New York SDWA Violation History Table - Prior 10 Years

Compliance Period Status Health-Based? Category Code Code Rule Code Contaminant Code Rule Group Code Rule Family Code
02/01/2017 - Addressed Yes Treatment Technique Violation (TT) Treatment Technique Uncovered Reservoir (47) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (123) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (0800) Microbials (100) Surface Water Treatment Rules (120)
10/01/2012 - 10/31/2012 Resolved Yes Treatment Technique Violation (TT) Treatment Technique (SWTR and GWR) (41) Surface Water Treatment Rule (121) Surface Water Treatment Rule (0200) Microbials (100) Surface Water Treatment Rules (120)
04/01/2012 - 04/30/2012 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring of Treatment (SWTR-Unfilt/GWR) (31) Surface Water Treatment Rule (121) Surface Water Treatment Rule (0200) Microbials (100) Surface Water Treatment Rules (120)
12/01/2010 - 12/31/2010 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring of Treatment (SWTR-Unfilt/GWR) (31) Surface Water Treatment Rule (121) Surface Water Treatment Rule (0200) Microbials (100) Surface Water Treatment Rules (120)

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
show details
Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
show details
Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
show details
Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
show details
Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
show details

For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

New York Water - Frequently Asked Questions

IS THERE LEAD IN MY DRINKING WATER?
New York City’s award-winning tap water is delivered virtually lead-free through 7,000 miles of lead-free aqueducts, tunnels, and water mains in the city’s water supply system. However, homes built prior to 1961 may have lead service lines (which connect your house to the city’s water main in the street), and some homes, regardless of the year they were built, could have household plumbing and internal fixtures that contain lead. Although New York City takes extensive steps to protect water in homes that may have lead in their plumbing, lead from plumbing may still be released into a home's drinking water. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. DEP is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. Visit nyc.gov/leadfree to view an interactive map. This map offers historical information largely based on third-party plumbing records, supplemented, in some cases by information gathered during inspections. DEP offers free lead test kits to all New York City residents. Call 311 or visit nyc.gov/apps/311 to request a free lead test kit. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at epa.gov/safewater/lead. Exposure to lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. For more information, visit nyc.gov/lead.
HOW CAN I FIND OUT IF I HAVE A LEAD SERVICE LINE?
Visit nyc.gov/leadfree to view an interactive map. This map offers historical information largely based on third-party plumbing records, supplemented, in some cases by information gathered during inspections. DEP offers free lead test kits to all New York City residents. Call 311 or visit nyc.gov/apps/311 to request a free lead test kit. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at epa.gov/safewater/lead. Exposure to lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. For more information, visit nyc.gov/lead.
HOW CAN I TEST THE WATER IN MY HOME?
DEP offers free lead test kits to all New York City residents. Call 311 or visit nyc.gov/apps/311 to request a free lead test kit. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at epa.gov/safewater/lead. Exposure to lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. For more information, visit nyc.gov/lead.
WHAT ARE THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LEAD?
Exposure to lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. For more information, visit nyc.gov/lead.
HOW CAN I LIMIT MY LEAD EXPOSURE?
Run Your Tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking, when your water has been sitting for several hours. Use Cold Water for cooking, drinking, or preparing infant formula. Hot tap water is more likely to contain lead and other metals. Remove & Clean the faucet screen monthly (also called an aerator), where small particles can get trapped. Hire a licensed plumber to identify and replace plumbing fixtures and/or service line that contain lead.
HOW TO READ THE NEW YORK CITY 2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS
The following section of this report compares the quality of your tap water to federal and state standards for each parameter (if applicable). The monitoring results show that New York City’s drinking water met all drinking water standards in 2020. The following tables reflect the compliance monitoring results for all regulated and non-regulated parameters, the number of samples collected, the range of values detected, the average of the values detected, and the possible sources of the parameters, unless otherwise footnoted. The monitoring frequency of each parameter varies and is parameter specific. Data presented are for the Catskill/ Delaware and Croton supplies, which were the only sources of water in 2020. The table on page 15 represents those parameters monitored for, but not detected in any sample. Most of our data are representative of 2020 testing; concentrations of parameters or contaminants do not change frequently.
HOW DO I CONTACT NEW YORK CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the New York water provider, New York City System, please use the information below.
By Mail: 59-17 Junction Blvd.
FLUSHING, NY, 11373
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR NEW YORK CITY SYSTEM
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their New York City System account to pay their New York water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your New York City System bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your New York water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your New York water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP NEW YORK WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in New York means you will often need to put the water in your name with New York City System. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in New York means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with New York City System. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

Is New York Tap Water Safe to Drink? Tap water & safety quality

The estimated price of bottled water

$2.34 in USD (1.5-liter)

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

New York tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 27% Low
  • Water Pollution 47% Moderate
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 73% High
  • Water Quality 53% Moderate

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in New York, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

New York Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from New York's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

 

 

 

 

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Vincent Sapienza, P.E.

Commissioner

Dear Friends:

This past year has presented our agency, our city, and our nation with historic challenges. The work we do at the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has never been more vital to protecting the health of New Yorkers.

Despite the challenges presented by the COVID-19 global pandemic, we have remained focused and disciplined in our commitment to being a world-class water utility and building a sustainable future for all New Yorkers. At DEP, we are no strangers to confronting situations that require quick thinking and innovative solutions. Through all the challenges we faced in 2020, I am proud to report that each day we continued to deliver one billion gallons of the best tap water in the world to more than 9.3 million New Yorkers.

In this report, you will see that New York City’s drinking water continued to meet or surpass every national and state standard for quality. These data are based on 43,600 samples that were collected by DEP scientists throughout our reservoir system, and at nearly 1,000 street-side sampling stations in every neighborhood across the city. Those samples were analyzed 530,000 times by scientists working in our four water quality laboratories. Robotic monitoring stations on our reservoirs provided another 2.7 million tests to ensure DEP was sending the best-quality water to New York City at all times.

I want to especially thank the many DEP employees who went above and beyond in 2020, putting their commitment to public service before themselves, and truly embodying DEP’s core values. And, as we embark on a new decade, I also want to thank each of you for entrusting DEP with your drinking water supply. We take great pride in delivering the best water to millions of New Yorkers every day.

Sincerely,

Vincent Sapienza, P.E.

Commissioner

2

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, DEP’s 6,000 dedicated scientists, engineers, and other professionals continued to protect, operate, and maintain New York City’s water supply system, delivering high-quality drinking water to millions of New Yorkers around the clock, without interruption

NEW YORK CITY’S WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM

New York City’s water supply system provides more than one billion gallons of safe drinking water every day to more than 8.3 million residents of New York City and one million people living in the counties of Westchester, Putnam, Orange, and Ulster. In 2020, we delivered 104 million gallons per day to 74 communities and institutions outside NYC. In all, this system provides nearly half the population of New York State with high-quality drinking water.

New York City gets its drinking water from 19 reservoirs and three controlled lakes spread across

  1. nearly 2,000-square-mile watershed. The watershed is located upstate in portions of the Hudson Valley and Catskill Mountains that are as far as 125 miles north of the city. New York City’s water supply system is comprised of two primary surface water supplies called the Catskill/Delaware and Croton. The city also has a permit to operate a groundwater supply in Southeast Queens, although water from that system has not been delivered to customers in many years.

In 2020, New York City received a blend of drinking water from the Catskill/Delaware and Croton supplies. The Catskill/Delaware provided approximately 96 percent of the water, and approximately 4 percent was supplied by Croton. An estimated 10 percent of the water supply was lost due to distribution system leakage.

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

3

TREATING OUR DRINKING WATER

CATSKILL/DELAWARE SUPPLY

Due to the very high quality of our Catskill/Delaware supply, New York City is one of only five large cities in the country with a surface drinking water supply that does not utilize filtration as a form of treatment. The Catskill/Delaware supply operates under a filtration waiver, referred to as the “Filtration Avoidance Determination” (FAD), and the water from this supply is treated using two forms of disinfection to reduce microbial risk.

Water is disinfected with chlorine, a common disinfectant added to kill germs and stop bacteria from growing on pipes, and then with ultraviolet (UV) light at the Catskill/Delaware UV Disinfection Facility. The facility, located in Westchester County, is the largest of its kind in the world and is designed to disinfect more than two billion gallons of water per day. At the UV Disinfection Facility, exposure to UV light inactivates potentially harmful microorganisms without changing the water.

DEP also adds food grade phosphoric acid, sodium hydroxide, and fluoride to the water before sending it into distribution. Phosphoric acid is added because it creates a protective film on pipes that reduces the release of metals, such as lead, from service lines and household plumbing. Sodium hydroxide is added to raise the pH which reduces corrosion of household plumbing. Fluoride is added to improve dental protection and is effective in preventing cavities at a federally-approved level of 0.7 mg/L. During 2020, only 0.2 percent of the water produced by Catskill/Delaware supply was not fluoridated.

CROTON SUPPLY

The Croton supply is filtered by the Croton Water Filtration Plant, located underground in the Bronx. The plant has the ability to treat up to 290 million gallons of drinking water each day, which helps to ensure a large enough supply of water for the city to withstand

droughts, periodically shut down other parts of the The New Croton Reservoir Dam water supply, and respond to the potential effects of

climate change. The Croton Water Filtration Plant first began operating in May 2015.

Once water arrives at the filtration plant it undergoes treatment to remove impurities. The treatment processes include coagulation, dissolved air flotation, filtration, and disinfection. During coagulation, chemicals are added to untreated water, causing any particulates to bunch together and become larger particles called floc. Then injected air bubbles float the floc to the top where it is skimmed off using a process called dissolved air flotation. Finally, the water flows through a filter bed removing any remaining particles. Just like the Catskill/Delaware supply, Croton water is disinfected with chlorine and UV light to protect against potentially-harmful microorganisms, and is treated with food grade phosphoric acid, sodium hydroxide, and fluoride. In 2020, DEP upgraded the material in the filter beds from anthracite to granular activated carbon (GAC) to improve the plant’s performance. Once the change was completed, the plant resumed operations on October 27 to December 31, during which time, only 0.6 percent of the water produced by the plant was not fluoridated.

20202020DRINKINGDRINKINGWATERWATERSUPPLYSUPPLYANDANDQUALITYQUALITYREPORTREPORT

DEP’s water quality monitoring program—far more extensive than required by law—demonstrates that the quality of New York City’s drinking water remains high and meets all state and federal drinking water standards

4

TESTING FOR QUALITY

DRINKING WATER SAMPLING AND

MONITORING

DEP monitors the water in the distribution system, upstate reservoirs and feeder streams, and wells that are potential sources for New York City’s drinking water supply. We continuously sample and conduct analyses for numerous water quality parameters, including microbiological, chemical, and physical measures, throughout the watershed and as the water enters the distribution system. DEP also regularly tests water quality at nearly 1,000 water quality sampling stations throughout New York City. In 2020, DEP performed over 363,200 analyses on 31,300 samples from

the distribution system, meeting all state and federal monitoring requirements. These data are summarized in tables starting on page 11.

Additionally, DEP performed over 166,800 analyses on 12,300 samples from the upstate reservoir watersheds and took more than 2.7 million robotic monitoring measurements to support FAD watershed protection programs and to optimize water quality.

REGULATION OF DRINKING WATER

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activities. Contaminants that may be present in source water

include microbial contaminants, inorganic contaminants, pesticides and herbicides, organic chemical contaminants, and radioactive contaminants.

To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The NYSDOH and the federal Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. These regulations also establish the minimum amount of testing and monitoring that each system must undertake to ensure that the tap water is safe to drink.

Visit epa.gov/safewater or health.ny.gov for more information about drinking water.

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

5

PROTECTING OUR WATER AT THE SOURCE

10-YEAR FILTRATION AVOIDANCE DETERMINATION (FAD)

DEP funds and administers a number of watershed protection and pollution prevention programs to maintain the high quality of our drinking water. These science-based strategies are designed to protect New York City’s drinking water at its source by keeping pollution out of our reservoirs and the streams, creeks, and rivers that feed them.

NYSDOH issued the most current FAD in 2017 that allows DEP to continue operating the Catskill/ Delaware supply without filtration through at least 2027. DEP will commit an estimated $1 billion over the coming decade to comply with the FAD, which will go towards our watershed programs that conserve watershed lands, upgrade wastewater infrastructure, implement clean water strategies on watershed farms, and manage streams, forests, and other natural resources that affect water quality.

SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS

Federal regulations require states to develop and implement source water assessment programs to identify the areas that supply public tap water, inventory contaminants, assess water system susceptibility to contamination, and inform the public of the results. The states are given a great deal of flexibility on how to implement source water assessment programs. These assessments are created using available information to help estimate the potential for source water contamination. Higher susceptibility ratings do not mean that source water contamination has occurred or will occur in a water supply; rather, they indicate the need for water suppliers to implement additional precautionary measures. Because of DEP’s extensive watershed protection and pollution prevention programs, NYSDOH does not find it necessary to perform a source water assessment on the New York City water supply.

Water quality monitoring at Bear Kill which leads to Schoharie Reservoir

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

REPORT LEAKS & WATER WASTE
Call 311
6
Don’t open ￿re hydrants.
6 Don’t let the water run while washing dishes. Kitchen faucets use 2 to 3 gallons a minute. Filling a basin only takes 10 gallons to wash and rinse.
EVERYWHERE
4 Do install water-saving ￿xtures.
6 Don't ignore water leaks. Turn taps o￿ tightly.
OUTDOORS
4 Do use a self-closing nozzle on your hose.
Do run the dishwasher & washing machine only when full.
4
BATHROOM
4 Do take shorter showers and ￿ll the tub halfway.
6 Don’t run water while washing your hands & brushing your teeth.
KITCHEN & LAUNDRY

6

CONSERVING OUR SUPPLY

Although New York City has grown by more than

1.3 million people since 1980, demand for water has dropped by approximately 35 percent—making it one of the most water-efficient large cities in the country.

The average single-family household in New York City uses approximately 70,000 gallons of water each year at a cost of $3.99 per 100 cubic feet of water

(748 gallons), or about $373 a year. Since nearly all customers also receive wastewater collection and treatment services, which cost about $594, the combined annual water and sewer charge for the typical New York City household using 70,000 gallons per year is $967, calculated at fiscal year 2021 rates.

Advances in technology have played a key role in the drop of water consumption, from the replacement of thousands of inefficient toilets through DEP’s toilet replacement program, to an automated leak detection program, which helps our customers save both money and water by alerting homeowners to unusual spikes in water consumption. DEP has also partnered with other city agencies, colleges, and businesses to help conserve water by installing more than 400 spray shower timers in NYC Parks playgrounds, 34,000 efficient bathroom fixtures in 402 New York City public schools, and a water reuse station at the Fire Department of the City of New York’s (FDNY) Fire Training Academy on Randall’s Island which includes

  1. 40,000-gallon underground water storage tank used for calibrating equipment on pumper apparatus.

These, and other recent investments, have reduced overall demand for water by more than 11.2 million gallons per day. By 2022, we plan to nearly double that by conserving 20 million gallons per day through new and ongoing initiatives.

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

7

PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

We are continuing to build upon DEP’s legacy of long-term planning and have made significant progress on keystone projects already underway. In 2020, we completed the third year of an all- important capital project to rehabilitate the Catskill Aqueduct. Skilled workers replaced century-old valves along the northern 74 miles of the aqueduct and repaired minor leaks to ensure the aqueduct continues to deliver water from the Catskills to New York City after more than a century in service.

In May 2020, the final segment of steel lining was lowered into the Delaware Aqueduct Bypass Tunnel, marking another significant milestone in our project to repair the longest tunnel in the world. The last of 230 massive steel liners was lowered down an access shaft in the Town of Newburgh. Each steel segment is 16 feet in diameter, 40 feet long, and weighs 106,000 pounds. DEP expected to complete the installation of steel liners by August 2020, but laborers finished this vital portion of the $1 billion project several months ahead of schedule. In addition to meeting this milestone, we also placed more than 70 percent of the tunnel’s finished concrete liner.

This summer, DEP announced the start of subsurface analyses for the future upgrades to the dam and dikes at Ashokan Reservoir. Field work began in August to support future upgrades to the dam and dikes that impound water at the reservoir. The work focuses on gathering soil and bedrock samples that are needed for the engineering and design of upgrades at each structure. The subsurface investigations are connected to the Ashokan Century Program, a comprehensive, multi-year capital program to upgrade the dam, dikes, chambers and other infrastructure at Ashokan Reservoir. The program comprises the largest public works project in the Catskills in more than 50 years.

Work on steel liners for the Delaware Aqueduct Bypass Tunnel (each liner section is 16' in diameter and 40' long)

20202020DRINKINGDRINKINGWATERWATERSUPPLYSUPPLYANDANDQUALITYQUALITYREPORTREPORT

8

CRYPTOSPORIDIUM AND GIARDIA

DEP maintains a comprehensive program to monitor its source waters and watersheds for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, microscopic organisms that can cause disease. In 2020, DEP collected weekly samples of water leaving Kensico Reservoir, prior to chlorination and UV disinfection, and leaving Hillview Reservoir, prior to secondary disinfection with chlorine. Water leaving New Croton Reservoir was sampled quarterly. Samples were analyzed using EPA Method 1623.1. The Cryptosporidium and Giardia data for water leaving the Kensico, Hillview, and New Croton reservoirs are presented in the table on page 14 of this report.

While there is no evidence that any cases of cryptosporidiosis or giardiasis have been caused by the New York City water supply, federal and state law requires all water suppliers to notify their customers about the potential risks from Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are intestinal illnesses caused by microscopic pathogens, which can be waterborne. Symptoms of infection include nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. Some people may be more vulnerable

to disease causing microorganisms, or pathogens in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons, such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly individuals, and infants, can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice from their health care providers about their drinking water. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and other microbial contaminants are available from EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

New York City’s Waterborne Disease Risk Assessment Program (WDRAP), a partnership between DEP and DOHMH, helps assess and ensure the microbial safety of NYC’s tap water. Under WDRAP,

NYC conducts disease surveillance for Cryptosporidium and Giardia to track incidence and to examine patterns and potential

risk exposures in the population. The city also conducts syndromic surveillance for gastrointestinal symptoms to monitor trends to ensure identification of any waterborne disease outbreak, should one occur. Disease and syndromic surveillance continued to indicate that there have been no outbreaks of Cryptosporidium and Giardia attributed to tap water consumption in New York City.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, DEP scientists continued their work to insure the high-quality of New York City's drinking water supply

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

9

LEAD IN DRINKING WATER: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

IS THERE LEAD IN MY DRINKING WATER?

New York City’s award-winning tap water is delivered virtually lead-free through 7,000 miles of lead-free aqueducts, tunnels, and water mains in the city’s water supply system. However, homes built prior to 1961 may have lead service lines (which connect your house to the city’s water main in the street), and some homes, regardless of the year they were built, could have household plumbing and internal fixtures that contain lead. Although New York City takes extensive steps to protect water in homes that may have lead in their plumbing, lead from plumbing may still be released into a home's drinking water. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. DEP is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.

HOW CAN I FIND OUT IF I HAVE A LEAD SERVICE LINE?

Visit nyc.gov/leadfree to view an interactive map. This map offers historical information largely based on third-party plumbing records, supplemented, in some cases by information gathered during inspections.

HOW CAN I TEST THE WATER IN MY HOME?

DEP offers free lead test kits to all New York City residents. Call 311 or visit nyc.gov/apps/311 to request a free lead test kit. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at epa.gov/safewater/lead.

WHAT ARE THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF LEAD?

Exposure to lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women, infants, and young children. For more information, visit nyc.gov/lead.

How can I limit my lead exposure?

Run Your Tap

for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking, when your water has been sitting for several hours.

Use Cold Water

for cooking, drinking, or preparing infant formula. Hot tap water is more likely to contain lead and other metals.

Remove & Clean

the faucet screen monthly (also called an aerator), where small particles can get trapped.

Hire

a licensed plumber to identify and replace plumbing fixtures and/or service line that contain lead.

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

10

DEP scientist performing water testing at the NYC Water Quality Distribution Laboratory

HOW TO READ THE NEW YORK CITY 2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

The following section of this report compares the quality of your tap water to federal and state standards for each parameter (if applicable). The monitoring results show that New York City’s drinking water met all drinking water standards in 2020.

The following tables reflect the compliance monitoring results for all regulated and non-regulated parameters, the number of samples collected, the range of values detected, the average of the values detected, and the possible sources of the parameters, unless otherwise footnoted. The monitoring frequency of each parameter varies and is parameter specific. Data presented are for the Catskill/ Delaware and Croton supplies, which were the only sources of water in 2020. The table on page 15 represents those parameters monitored for, but not detected in any sample.

Most of our data are representative of 2020 testing; concentrations of parameters or contaminants do not change frequently.

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

11

THE NEW YORK CITY

2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

DETECTED CONVENTIONAL PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PARAMETERS

PARAMETER

NYSDOH MCL

EPA MCLG

(Highest Level

(Ideal

Allowed)

Goal)

 

 

#

SAMPLES

RANGE

AVERAGE

MCL

VIOLATION

LIKELY SOURCES IN DRINKING WATER

Alkalinity (mg/L CaCO3)

-

 

297

14 - 76

20

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aluminum (µg/L)

50 - 200 (1)

 

300

8 - 40

13

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Barium (mg/L)

2

2

300

0.01 - 0.04

0.02

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bromide (µg/L)

- (2)

 

8

8 - 35

20

No

Naturally occurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calcium (mg/L)

-

 

300

5 - 27

7

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chloride (mg/L)

250

 

297

11- 75

17

No

Naturally occurring; road salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chlorine Residual, Free (mg/L)

4 (3)

 

14,855

0.0 - 1.2

0.6 (3)

No

Water additive for disinfection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chromium (µg/L)

100

 

300

ND - 4

ND

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color - distribution system

-

 

13,651

3 - 47

6

No

Presence of iron, manganese, and

(color units - apparent)

 

organics in water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Color - entry points (color units -

15 (4)

 

1,207

3 - 12

6

No

Presence of iron, manganese, and

apparent)

 

organics in water

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copper (mg/L)

1.3 (5)

1.3

300

ND - 0.052

0.007

No

Corrosion of household plumbing;

erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corrosivity (Langelier index)

- (6)

 

76

-2.76 to -1.96

-2.31

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fluoride (mg/L)

2.2 (4)

4

1,930

0.4 - 0.8

0.7

No

Water additive which promotes strong

teeth; erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hardness (mg/L CaCO3)

-

 

300

16 - 106

24

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hardness (grains/gallon[US]

-

 

300

0.9 - 5.9

1.4

No

Erosion of natural deposits

CaCO

) (7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Iron (µg/L)

300 (4) (8)

 

300

ND - 881 (8)

33

No

Naturally occurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lead (µg/L)

15 (5)

0

300

ND - 2 (9)

ND

No

Corrosion of household plumbing;

erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magnesium (mg/L)

-

 

300

1 - 9.3

1.7

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued on next page

2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

12

DETECTED CONVENTIONAL PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PARAMETERS (continued)

PARAMETER

NYSDOH MCL

EPA MCLG

(Highest Level

(Ideal

Allowed)

Goal)

 

 

#

SAMPLES

RANGE

AVERAGE

MCL

VIOLATION

LIKELY SOURCES IN DRINKING WATER

Manganese (µg/L)

300 (4) (8)

 

300

ND - 38

18

No

Naturally occurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nickel (µg/L)

-

 

 

300

ND - 2 (9)

ND

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching

Nitrate (mg/L nitrogen)

10

 

10

297

0.04

- 0.17

0.10

No

from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pH (pH units)

6.8 - 8.2 (10)

 

14,854

6.9

- 8.0

7.4

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phosphate, Ortho- (mg/L)

1-4 (10)

 

14,855

1.2

- 3.5

2.1

No

Water additive for corrosion control

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Potassium (mg/L)

-

 

 

300

0.4

- 2.5

0.7

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Silica [silicon oxide] (mg/L)

-

 

 

200

1.8

- 5.2

2.5

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sodium (mg/L)

NDL (4)

(11)

 

300

9 - 44

12

No

Naturally occurring; road salt; water

 

softeners; animal waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specific Conductance (µS/cm)

-

 

 

14,858

80 - 461

109

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strontium (µg/L)

-

 

 

300

16

- 84

23

No

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sulfate (mg/L)

250

 

 

297

3 - 19

4

No

Naturally occurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Temperature (°F)

-

 

 

14,854

38

- 82

56

No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dissolved Solids (mg/L)

500 (1)

 

77

53

- 89

71

No

Metals and salts naturally occurring in

 

the soil; organic matter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Organic Carbon (mg/L)

-

 

 

378

0.7

- 3.0

1.6

No

Organic matter naturally present in

 

 

the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Organic Carbon - source

- (2)

 

 

8

2.1

- 4.2

3.1

No

Organic matter naturally present in

water (mg/L)

 

 

the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turbidity (12) - distribution system

5 (13)

 

 

13,651

ND - 9.2

0.8 (13)

No

Soil runoff

(NTU)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turbidity (12) - source water (NTU)

5 (14)

 

 

-

 

-

1.3 (14)

No

Soil runoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turbidity (12) - filtered water (NTU)

TT (15)

 

-

 

-

0.07 (15)

No

Soil runoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UV 254 (absorbance/cm)

-

 

 

307

0.009

- 0.073

0.029

No

Organic matter naturally present in

 

 

the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zinc (mg/L)

5 (4)

 

 

300

ND - 0.019

ND

No

Naturally occurring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued on next page

2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

13

DETECTED ORGANIC PARAMETERS

PARAMETER

NYSDOH MCL

(Highest Level

Allowed)

EPA MCLG

(Ideal Goal)

# SAMPLES

RANGE

AVERAGE

MCL

VIOLATION

LIKELY SOURCES IN DRINKING WATER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Probable source is sample

Bis(2-Ethylhexy)phthalate (µg/L)

6

 

74

ND - 0.6 (9)

ND

No

contamination from plastic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gloves or air particulates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bromochloroacetic Acid (µg/L)

50

 

293

ND - 4

1

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bromodichloroacetic Acid (µg/L)

50 (2)

 

80

1 - 5

3

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

t-Butyl alcohol

50

 

318

ND - D (16)

ND

No

Used in dyes, drugs, and

 

explosives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chlorodibromoacetic Acid (µg/L)

50 (2)

 

80

ND - 0.6

ND

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dalapon (µg/L)

50

 

293

ND - 1.2

ND

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haloacetic Acid 5 (HAA5) (µg/L)

60 (17)

 

293

4 - 72

51 (17)

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haloacetic Acid Brominated (HAA6Br)

- (2)

 

80

2 - 9

4

No

By-product of drinking water

(µg/L)

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Haloacetic Acid 9 (HAA9) (µg/L)

- (2)

 

80

31 - 82

53

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Organic Halogen (µg/L)

-

 

56

157 - 227

187

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) (µg/L)

80 (17)

 

300

7 - 75

51 (17)

No

By-product of drinking water

 

chlorination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DETECTED MICROBIAL PARAMETERS

PARAMETER

NYSDOH MCL

(Highest Level

Allowed)

EPA MCLG

(Ideal Goal)

# SAMPLES

RANGE

  • SAMPLES POSITIVE

HIGHEST AVERAGE MONTH % POSITIVE

MCL

VIOLATION

LIKELY SOURCES IN DRINKING WATER

Total Coliform Bacteria

5%

0

9,806

-

33

-

1.1%

No

Naturally present in

(% of samples positive/month)

the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E. coli (MPN/100mL)

- (18)

0

9,806

-

0

-

0.0%

No

Animal fecal waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heterotrophic Plate Count

TT

-

8,571

ND - 95

92

ND

-

No

Naturally present in

(CFU/mL)

the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued on next page

2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

14

LEAD AND COPPER RULE SAMPLING AT RESIDENTIAL WATER TAPS

PARAMETER

NYSDOH AL

EPA MCLG

(Ideal Goal)

90% OF YOUR LEVELS WERE LESS THAN

RANGE

  • SAMPLES EXCEEDING AL

Exceedance

LIKELY SOURCES IN DRINKING WATER

Copper (mg/L)

1.3

1.3

0.204

0.005 - 0.640

0 out of 411

No

Corrosion of household plumbing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lead (µg/L)

15

0

11

ND - 120

28 out of 411

No

Corrosion of household plumbing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CRYPTOSPORIDIUM AND GIARDIA SAMPLING

FROM SOURCE WATER LEAVING RESERVOIRS (19)

PARAMETER

RESERVOIR

# SAMPLES

  • SAMPLES POSITIVE

RANGE

LIKELY SOURCES IN DRINKING WATER

 

Kensico

52

3

0 - 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cryptosporidium (oocysts/50L)

Hillview

52

2

0 - 1

Animal fecal waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Croton

4

0

0

 

 

Kensico

52

35

0 - 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giardia (cysts/50L)

Hillview

52

17

0 - 5

Animal fecal waste

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Croton

4

3

0 - 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNITS AND ABBREVIATIONS

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG):

CaCO3 = calcium carbonate

The level of a contaminant in drinking water below

which there is no known or expected risk to health.

CFU/mL = colony forming units per milliliter

MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

/cm = per centimeter

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL):

D = detected parameter

The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking

°F = degrees Fahrenheit

water. The addition of a disinfectant is necessary for

µg/L = micrograms per liter (10-6 grams per liter)

control of microbial contaminants.

µS/cm = microsiemens per centimeter

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG):

mg/L = milligrams per liter (10-3 grams per liter)

The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which

MPN/100mL = most probable number per 100 milliliters

there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs

ND = parameter is not detected

do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to

NDL = no designated limits

control microbial contamination.

NTU = nephelometric turbidity units

Treatment Technique (TT):

/50L = per 50 liters

A required process intended to reduce the level of a

 

contaminant in drinking water.

DEFINITIONS

90th Percentile Value:

Action Level (AL):

The values reported for lead and copper represent the

90th percentile. A percentile is a value on a scale of 100

The concentration of a contaminant, which, if

that indicates the percent of a distribution that is equal

exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements

to or below the value. The 90th percentile is equal to or

that a water system must follow.

greater than 90 percent of the lead and copper values

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL):

detected at your water system.

The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in

 

drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as

 

feasible, using the best available treatment technology.

 

 

 

2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

15

NOT DETECTED PARAMETERS

Conventional Physical and Chemical Parameters:

Antimony, Arsenic, Asbestos, Beryllium, Cadmium, Cyanide, Gross alpha, Lithium, Mercury, Nitrite, Selenium, Silver, Thallium, Uranium

Principal Organic Contaminants:

Benzene, Bromobenzene, Bromochloromethane, Bromomethane, n-Butylbenzene, sec-Butylbenzene, tert-Butylbenzene, Carbon tetrachloride, Chlorobenzene, Chloroethane*, Chloromethane, 2-Chlorotoluene, 4-Chlorotoluene, Dibromomethane, 1,2-Dichlorobenzene, 1,3-Dichlorobenzene, 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Dichlorodifluoromethane, 1,1-Dichloroethane, 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,1-Dichloroethene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene, 1,2-Dichloropropane, 1,3-Dichloropropane, 2,2-Dichloropropane*, 1,1-Dichloropropene, cis-1,3-Dichloropropene, trans-1,3-Dichloropropene, total 1,3-Dichloropropene, Ethylbenzene, Hexachlorobutadiene, Isopropylbenzene, p-Isopropyltoluene, Methylene chloride, n-Propylbenzene, Styrene, 1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane,Tetrachloroethylene,Toluene, 1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene, 1,1,1-Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-Trichloroethane, Trichloroethene, Trichlorofluoromethane, 1,2,3-Trichloropropane, 1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene, m,p-Xylene, o-Xylene, total Xylene

Specified Organic Contaminants:

Alachlor, Aldicarb (Temik), Aldicarb sulfone, Aldicarb sulfoxide, Aldrin, Atrazine, Benzo(a)pyrene, Butachlor, Carbaryl, Carbofuran (Furadan), Chlordane, 2,4-D, 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane, Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, Dicamba, Dieldrin, Dinoseb, 1,4-Dioxane, Diquat, Endothall, Endrin, Ethylene dibromide (EDB), Glyphosate, Heptachlor, Heptachlor epoxide, Hexachlorobenzene, 3-Hydroxycarbofuran, Lindane, Methomyl, Methoxychlor, Methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE), Metolachlor, Metribuzin, Oxamyl (Vydate), Pentachlorophenol, Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), Picloram, Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), PCB 1016 Aroclor, PCB 1221 Aroclor, PCB 1232 Aroclor, PCB 1242 Aroclor, PCB 1248 Aroclor, PCB 1254 Aroclor, PCB 1260 Aroclor, Propachlor, Simazine, 2,3,7,8-TCDD (Dioxin), Toxaphene, 2,4,5-TP (Silvex), Vinyl chloride

Unspecified Organic Contaminants:

Acenaphthene, Acenaphthylene, Acetochlor, Acetone, Acifluorfen, Allyl chloride, Ametryn, t-amyl ethyl ether, tert-Amyl methyl ether, Anthracene, Atraton, Bentazon, Benzo[a]anthracene, Benzo[b]fluoranthene, Benzo[g,h,i]perylene, Benzo[k]fluoranthene, beta-BHC, Bromacil, Bromoethane, 1,3-Butadiene, 2-Butanone (MEK), Butylate, Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), Butylbenzylphthalate, tert-Butyl ethyl ether, Caffeine, Carbon Disulfide, alpha-Chlordane, gamma-Chlordane, trans-Chlordane, Chlorfenvinphos, Chlorobenzilate, 2-Chlorobiphenyl, 4-Chlorobiphenyl, 1-Chlorobutane, Chlorodifluoromethane, Chloroneb, Chlorothalonil (Draconil,Bravo), Chlorpropham, Chlorpyrifos (Dursban), Chrysene, Cyanazine, Cycloate, 2,4-DB, DCPA (Dacthal), 2,4-DDD, 4,4'-DDD, 2,4-DDE, 4,4'-DDE, 2,4-DDT, 4,4'-DDT, DEET, Diazinon, Dibenz[a,h]anthracene, 3,5-Dichlorobenzoic acid, 2,4'-Dichlorobiphenyl, Dichlorprop, Dichlorvos (DDVP), Diethyl ether, Diethylphthalate, Di-isopropyl ether, Diisopropyl methylphosphonate, Dimethipin, Dimethoate, Dimethylphthalate, Di-n-Butylphthalate, 2,4-Dinitrotoluene, 2,6-Dinitrotoluene, Di-N-octylphthalate, Diphenamid, Disulfoton, Endosulfan I, Endosulfan II, Endosulfan sulfate, Endrin aldehyde, Endrin Ketone, EPTC, Ethion, Ethoprop, Ethyl methacrylate, Etridiazole, Fenarimol, Fluoranthene, Fluorene, Fluridone, alpha-HCH, beta-HCH, delta-HCH, 2,2',3,4,4',5,5'-Heptachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',3,4,4',5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',3,4',5',6-Hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl, Hexachloroethane, Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, Hexazinone, Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, Isophorone, Malathion, Methiocarb, Methyl acetate, Methyl iodide, Methyl parathion, 4-Methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK), Mevinphos, MGK264 - isomer a, MGK264 - isomer b, Molinate, Naphthalene, Napropamide, Nitrofen, cis-Nonachlor, trans-Nonachlor, Norflurzon, Oxyfluorfen, Paraquat, Parathion, Pebulate, Pendimethalin, 2,3,3',4',6-Pentachlorobiphenyl, 2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl, Pentachloroethane, Perfluorobutanesulfonic acid, Perfluorodecanoic acid, Perfluorododecanoic acid, Perfluoroheptanoic acid, Perfluorohexanesulfonic acid, Perfluorohexanoic acid, Perfluorononanoic acid, Perfluorotetradecanoic acid, Perfluorotridecanoic acid, Perfluoroundecanoic acid, cis-Permethrin & trans-Permethrin, Permethrin (mixed isomers), Phenanthrene, Phorate, Phosphamidon, Profenofos, Prometon, Prometryn, Pronamide, Propazine, Propoxur (Baygon), Pyrene, Simetryn, 2,4,5-T, Tebuconazole, Tebuthiuron, Terbacil, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, 2,2',3,5'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',5,5'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,3',4',5-Tetrachlorobiphenyl, Tetrachlorovinphos, Tetrahydrofuran, Thiobencarb, Triademefon, Tribufos, 2,2',5-Trichlorobiphenyl, 2,4,4'-Trichlorobiphenyl, Trichlorotrifluoroethane(Freon 113), Trifluralin, 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene, Vernolate, Vinclozolin

2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

16

2020 MONITORING DATA FOOTNOTES

  1. EPA Secondary MCL: NYSDOH has not set an MCL for this parameter.
  2. Monitored for under the Fourth Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR4) in
    2018 and 2019. UCMR4 included source water monitoring for bromide and total organic carbon; no MCL has been established for these parameters.
  3. Value represents MRDL, which is a level of disinfectant added for water treatment that may not be exceeded at the consumer's tap without an unacceptable possibility of adverse health effects. The MRDL is enforceable in the same manner as an MCL and is the calculated running annual average. Data presented are the range of individual sampling results and the highest of the four quarterly running annual averages.
  4. Determination of MCL violation: If a sample exceeds the MCL, a second sample must be collected from the same location within two weeks, or as soon as practical. If the average of the two results exceeds the MCL, then an MCL violation has occurred.
  5. Action Level (not an MCL) measured at-the-tap.
    The data presented in this table were collected from sampling stations at the street curb. For at-the-tap monitoring, see the Lead and Copper
    Rule Sampling at Residential Water Taps table.
  6. A Langelier Index of less than zero indicates corrosive tendencies.
  7. Hardness of up to 3 grains per gallon is considered soft water; between 3 and 9 is moderately hard water.
  8. If iron and manganese are present, the total concentration of both should not exceed 500 µg/L. One exceedance of the iron MCL occurred at site
    30150 (East Village, 10009) on 7/7/20 following an emergency shutdown of the water main.
  9. Only detected in one sample: lead was detected at site 11750 (City Island, 10464) on 6/2/20, nickel was detected at site 22950 (Clinton Hill, 11205) on 7/7/20, and Bis(2-Ethylhexy)phthalate was detected at site 1SCL1 (Van Cortlandt Village,
    10463) on 11/17/20 at the method reporting limit. In all other samples the parameter was not detected.
  10. NYSDOH established Optimal Water Quality
    Parameters (OWQP) under the Lead and Copper
    Rule which includes a range for pH and ortho- phosphate which are presented here. The reported average value for pH is the median value.
  1. Water containing more than 20 mg/L of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on severely restricted sodium diets. Water containing more than 270 mg/L of sodium should not be used for drinking by people on moderately restricted sodium diets.
  2. Turbidity is a measure of cloudiness of the water. Turbidity is monitored because it is a good indicator of water quality, because high turbidity can hinder the effectiveness of disinfection, and because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system.
  3. This MCL for turbidity is the monthly average rounded off to the nearest whole number. Data presented are the range of individual sampling results and the highest monthly average from distribution sites.
  4. This MCL for turbidity is on individual readings taken every four hours at the unfiltered Catskill/

    • Delaware source water entry point. Value presented is the highest individual sampling result.
  5. This is a Treatment Technique performance standard for the Croton Filtration Plant. The value presented is the highest single combined filter effluent turbidity measurement which occurred on

    • 11/25/20. In 2020, 100% of turbidity results were <0.3 NTU.
  6. Results for t-Butyl alcohol are only reported as detected (D) or not detected (ND).
  7. The MCLs for HAA5 and TTHMs are the calculated locational running annual average. The data

    • in the Range column are the minimum and maximum values of all sample sites monitored in the distribution system whether for compliance purposes or not. The values in the Average column are the highest locational running annual averages under the Stage 2 Disinfectant and Disinfection
      By-Products Rule.
  8. If a sample and its repeat sample are both positive for coliform bacteria and one of the two samples is positive for E. coli, then an MCL violation has occurred.
  9. Samples are collected prior to final disinfection or filtration. Positive results indicate (oo)cyst detection, not viability or infectivity.
    • Chloroethane and 2,2-Dichloropropane were incorrectly reported as having been monitored for in 2015 to 2019 in those year's reports. Monitoring for these two parameters, prior to 2020, last occurred in 2014 when they were not detected.

2020 DRINKING WATER QUALITY TESTING RESULTS

17

HILLVIEW RESERVOIR CONSENT JUDGEMENT

The Hillview Reservoir is the final stop for drinking water from the Catskill/Delaware System before it enters the city’s distribution system. The City and DEP entered into a Consent Decree and Judgement with the United States and New York State, effective May 15, 2019, which sets forth a schedule of compliance for the City to cover the Hillview Reservoir as required by the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (40 C.F.R §141.714). DEP and the City timely complied with all scheduled commitments due under the Decree in 2020.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION NUMBER

(PWSID) NY7003493

NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Commissioner Vincent Sapienza, P.E. // 718-595-3000 // nyc.gov/dep

59-17 Junction Blvd, Flushing, NY 11373.

NEW YORK CITY WATER BOARD

Visit nyc.gov/waterboard for a list of upcoming meetings and information about opportunities to participate in decisions that affect water quality.

CONTAMINANTS QUESTIONS

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

CRYPTOSPORIDIUM AND GIARDIA QUESTIONS

DOHMH Bureau of Communicable Diseases // 347-396-2600

CUSTOMER BILLING QUESTIONS

DEP Customer Service // 718-595-7000 // nyc.gov/dep

LEAD IN DRINKING WATER QUESTIONS

DEP Lead Unit // 718-595-5364 // nyc.gov/dep/leadindrinkingwater

HEALTH QUESTIONS (WATER SUPPLY-RELATED)

DOHMH // Call 311 or 212-NEW YORK (639-9675) // nyc.gov/apps/311 NYSDOH Bureau of Water Supply Protection // 518-402-7650 // health.ny.gov

REPORT UNUSUAL COLOR, TASTE OR ODOR OF DRINKING WATER Call 311 or 212-NEW YORK (639-9675) // nyc.gov/apps/311

REPORT POLLUTION, CRIME, OR TERRORISM IN THE WATERSHED DEP Police and Security // 888-H2O-SHED (426-7433) // nyc.gov/dep

REQUEST ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THIS REPORT OR VIEW REPORT ONLINE Call 311 or 212-NEW YORK (639-9675) // nyc.gov/waterqualityreport

TTY SERVICES

Call 212-504-4115

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

18

This report contains important information about your drinking water. Translate it, or speak with someone who understands it.

Este reporte contiene información muy importante sobre el agua que usted toma. Haga que se la traduzcan o hable con alguien que la entienda.

Ce rapport contient des informations importantes sur votre eau potable. Traduisez-le ou parlez en avec quelqu’un qui le comprend bien.

Rapò sa a gen enfòmasyon ki enpòtan anpil sou dlo w’ap bwè a. Fè tradwi-l pou ou, oswa pale ak yon moun ki konprann sa ki ekri ladan-l.

Ten raport zawiera bardzo istotną informacje o twojej wodzie pitnej. Przetłumacz go albo porozmawiaj z kimś kto go rozumie.

  • этом материале содержится важная информация относительно вашей питьевой воды. Переведите его или поговорите с кем-нибудь из тех, кто понимает его содержание.

這個報告中包含有關你的飲用水的重要信息 。請將此報告翻譯成你的語言 ,或者詢問懂得這份報 告的人 。

이 보고셔는 귀하의 식수에 관한 매우 중요한 정보를 포함하고 있습니다. 이 정보에 대해 이해하는 사람에 게 그 정보를 번역하거나 통역해 받으십시오.

. .

.

.

2020 DRINKING WATER SUPPLY AND QUALITY REPORT

VISIT US AT NYC.GOV/DEP • FOLLOW NYCWATER ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER

Contaminants


New York City System

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the New York Department of Health - Bureau of Public Water Supply Protection, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 8958659
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Surface water
  • Total: 16

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Bromodichloromethane
  • Bromoform
  • Chloroform
  • Chromium (hexavalent)
  • Dibromochloromethane
  • Dichloroacetic acid
  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)
  • Trichloroacetic acid

Other Detected Contaminants

  • 1%2C4-Dioxane
  • Chlorate
  • Chromium (total)
  • Haloacetic acids (HAA5)
  • Monochloroacetic acid
  • Nitrate
  • Nitrate and nitrite
  • Strontium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

Current Weather in New York City

NEW YORK WEATHER

Some of the Convenience Stores in New York

Sunrise Mart Convenience store
Sunrise Mart
  • Sunrise Mart 日本local food
  • New Rochelle APlus at Sunoco
  • 7-Eleven
  • Duane Reade
  • Speedway Gas Station
  • On the Run
  • QuickChek
  • Greenwich Village Farm
  • West 82 Grocery Inc
  • 99 Cents

Estimated Price of Bottled Water

VolumeUSDEURGBP
1.5-liter$2.30€2.06£1.84
500ml$0.89€0.81 £0.72
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