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Is Palm Bay Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 7:49 pm, August 11, 2022
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Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Palm Bay?

Yes, Palm Bay's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Palm Bay has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. To find more recent info we might have, you can check out our boil water notice page or the city's water provider website.

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from April 30, 2019 to June 30, 2022, Palm Bay's water utility, City of Palm Bay, had 0 violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. The last violation for Palm Bay was resolved on Dec. 31, 2013. This assessment is based on the City of Palm Bay water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for Palm Bay Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in Palm Bay tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in Palm Bay's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

Palm Bay Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named City of Palm Bay for Palm Bay in Florida. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

From Oct. 1, 2013 to Dec. 31, 2013, Palm Bay had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: TTHM.

From July 1, 2013 to Sept. 30, 2013, Palm Bay had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: TTHM.

From June 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013, Palm Bay had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

From May 1, 2013 to May 31, 2013, Palm Bay had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

From April 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013, Palm Bay had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: TTHM.

From Jan. 1, 2013 to Jan. 31, 2013, Palm Bay had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

Is there Lead in Palm Bay Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Palm Bay water system, City of Palm Bay, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.0033 mg/L of lead in Palm Bay water. This is 22.0% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Palm Bay contained more lead.

While Palm Bay water testing may have found 0.0033 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Palm Bay Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be at least one military base - Patrick Air Force Base - near Palm Bay with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Palm Bay has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

Palm Bay SDWA Violation History Table - Prior 10 Years

Compliance Period Status Health-Based? Category Code Code Rule Code Contaminant Code Rule Group Code Rule Family Code
10/01/2013 - 12/31/2013 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average (02) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2013 - 09/30/2013 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average (02) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
06/01/2013 - 06/30/2013 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) (22) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
05/01/2013 - 05/31/2013 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) (22) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
04/01/2013 - 06/30/2013 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average (02) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2013 - 01/31/2013 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) (22) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
show details
Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
show details
Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
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Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
show details
Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
show details

For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Palm Bay Water - Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT HAPPENED?
Due to an oversite in 2020, the City of Palm Bay Utilities Department (PBUD) failed to complete the second round of monitoring for Synthetic Organic Contaminants (SOCs). We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants regularly. According to FDEP regulations, we must sample certain contaminants, including SOCs, every three years. SOCs are organic (carbon-based) chemicals used as pesticides, defoliants, fuel additives, and other organic compounds. They are all man-made and do not naturally occur in the environment. Samples were taken on February 22, 2021. No SOC detects found in the second sample. FDEP was notified of the oversight. Notice letters are being published in accordance with level 3 state guidelines.
WHAT IS BEING DONE?
Samples were taken on February 22, 2021. No SOC detects found in the second sample. FDEP was notified of the oversight. Notice letters are being published in accordance with level 3 state guidelines.
WHAT SHOULD I DO?
Not to worry, there is nothing you need to do at this time. You do not need to boil your water or use an alternative water supply. It is important to note that no contaminants were detected at the time of sampling. Some individuals, such as the sick or elderly, may become seriously ill after consuming water containing certain contaminants. If you have immediate questions or concerns, please call the Palm Bay Utilities Outreach Coordinator at 321-952-3410. The Palm Bay Utilities Department is committed to providing clean, fresh drinking water to all customers and would like to assure customers that corrective actions have been taken to prevent a similar oversight in the future. If you would like more information about the quality of your drinking water, contact Utilities Customer Service, located in City Hall, 120 Malabar Rd. SE. Sincerely, Christopher A. Little, P.E. Utilities Director Palm Bay Utilities Department
HOW DO I CONTACT PALM BAY CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Palm Bay water provider, City of Palm Bay, please use the information below.
By Phone: 321-952-3410
By Mail: 250 OSMOSIS DR.
PALM BAY, FL, 32909
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR CITY OF PALM BAY
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their City of Palm Bay account to pay their Palm Bay water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your City of Palm Bay bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Palm Bay water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Palm Bay water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP PALM BAY WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Palm Bay means you will often need to put the water in your name with City of Palm Bay. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Palm Bay means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with City of Palm Bay. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Palm Bay tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 33% Low
  • Water Pollution 49% Moderate
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 67% High
  • Water Quality 51% Moderate

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Palm Bay, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Palm Bay Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from Palm Bay's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

WATER QUALITY REPORT 2021

TESTING PREFORMED IN 2020

PWS# 3050442

CITY OF PALM BAY UTILITIES DEPARTMENT

CONSUMER QUALITY REPORT

PBUD.ORG

For more on water quality and conservation visit us online.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Water Sources

3

Contaminants

4

Health & Testing

5

Public Notification

6

Key terms

7

Testing Data

8-9

Conservation

10-11

Education & Outreach

12

Resources

13

PAGE 02

WE ARE PLEASED TO PRESENT THE 2021 WATER QUALITY REPORT

A MESSAGE FROM YOUR UTILITIES PROVIDER

The City of Palm Bay Utilities Department (PBUD) is pleased to present our valued customers with the 2021 Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality services we provide to the community. Our goal is to deliver a safe and dependable supply of drinking water to all our customers within the PBUD's service area. This report will help you understand the efforts we make each day to improve water quality and continuously protect our water resources.

If you have questions about this report or your Utility service, please do not hesitate to contact us at 321.952.3410 or visit www.pbud.org.

DRINK. LIVE. PLAY.

PALM BAY'S WATER

Our mission as a public Utility is to provide superior drinking water and advanced treatment and disposal of wastewater through an effective Utility system, reflecting responsible environmental stewardship and striving for 100% customer satisfaction. We do our job with pride and are committed to ensuring the quality of your water.

The City of Palm Bay's water source is groundwater obtained from 41 wells located throughout the City. These raw water wells provide water to PBUD's 2 water treatment facilities. The water collected by our wells is drawn from the Floridan Aquifer at a depth of 850 feet and surficial aquifers at a depth ranging from 80 to 150 feet. PBUD treats the raw water from its wells using processes known as lime-softening and reverse osmosis. Once treated, the water is chlorinated for disinfection purposes and fluoridated for dental health before entering our distribution system and delivered to our customers.

PAGE 03

SOURCE WATER ASSESMENT

To ensure that public drinking water is compliant with national standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) initiated a program called SWAPP — Source Water Assessment and Protection Program. This program is intended to ensure that drinking water is safe at the tap and the source.

In 2020, the FDEP performed a Source Water Assessment of PBUD's water treatment system. The assessment was conducted to provide information about any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of our groundwaters wells. The evaluation showed 16 potential sources of contamination identified for this system with low to moderate susceptibility levels. The expanded results of the City of Palm Bay's Source Water Assessment are available for viewing at:

https://fldep.dep.state.fl.us

"OUR MISSION AS A PUBLIC UTILITY IS TO PROVIDE SUPERIOR DRINKING WATER AND ADVANCED TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL..."

"THE PRESENCE OF CONTAMINANTS IS NORMAL..."

PAGE 04

DRINKING-WATER CONTAMINANTS

Sources of drinking water include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels along the land's surface or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and radioactive materials (in some cases). It can pick up substances resulting from the presence of humans and animals. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  1. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses, parasites, and bacteria, may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, can naturally occur or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil, and gas.
  3. Pesticides and herbicides may come from various sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
  4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
  5. Radioactive contaminants can be naturally occurring or the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations that limit the number of specific contaminants in water provided by public water systems.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protections for public health.

Drinking water, including commercially bottled water, may reasonably contain small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of impurities is regular and does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk to consumers.

More information about contaminants found in water can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791.

"PBUD ROUTINELY MONITORS FOR

CONTAMINANTS IN YOUR DRINKING WATER..."

IMPORTANT HEALTH INFORMATION

PAGE 05

TESTING INFORMATION

PBUD routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water following Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring from the period of January 1, 2020, to December 31, 2020. Data obtained before January 1, 2020, presented in this report, was obtained from the most recent testing performed under the applicable laws, rules, and regulations.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised individuals such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

The EPA's Centers for Disease Control guidelines on the appropriate means of lessening the risk of infection by parasites (cryptosporidium) and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

If present, elevated lead levels can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.

The Palm Bay Utilities Department is responsible for providing high-quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in home plumbing components. When the water has been sitting for several hours, in-home plumbing, one can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing the tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.

If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your pipes tested. Information on lead, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 or by visiting www.epa.gov.

PUBLIC NOTIFICATION

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER MONITORING REQUIREMENTS NOT MET FOR CITY OF PALM BAY

Dear Palm Bay Utilities Customer,

This message is intended to notify all City of Palm Bay Utilities water customers that a required contaminant sample was not collected in accordance with regulations set by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP).

WHAT HAPPENED?

Due to an oversite in 2020, the City of Palm Bay Utilities Department (PBUD) failed to complete the second round of monitoring for Synthetic Organic Contaminants (SOCs). We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants regularly. According to FDEP regulations, we must sample certain contaminants, including SOCs, every three years. SOCs are organic (carbon-based) chemicals used as pesticides, defoliants, fuel additives, and other organic compounds. They are all man-made and do not naturally occur in the environment.

WHAT IS BEING DONE?

Samples were taken on February 22, 2021. No SOC detects found in the second sample. FDEP was notified of the oversight.

Notice letters are being published in accordance with level 3 state guidelines.

WHAT SHOULD I DO?

Not to worry, there is nothing you need to do at this time. You do not need to boil your water or use an alternative water supply.

It is important to note that no contaminants were detected at the time of sampling. Some individuals, such as the sick or elderly, may become seriously ill after consuming water containing certain contaminants.

If you have immediate questions or concerns, please call the Palm Bay Utilities Outreach Coordinator at 321-952-3410.

The Palm Bay Utilities Department is committed to providing clean, fresh drinking water to all customers and would like to assure customers that corrective actions have been taken to prevent a similar oversight in the future. If you would like more information about the quality of your drinking water, contact Utilities Customer Service, located in City Hall, 120 Malabar Rd. SE.

Sincerely,

Christopher A. Little, P.E.

Utilities Director

Palm Bay Utilities Department

PAGE 07

KEY TERMS TO KNOW

2020 WATER QUALITY TESTING DATA

01/01/20-12/31/20

INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

PAGE 08

NOTE:

According to FDEP regulations, we are required to sample certain contaminants, including Synthetic Organic Contaminants (SOCs), in two scheduled periods every three years. We were off schedule to complete the required second round of sampling in the second quarter of 2020 and therefore were in violation of monitoring and reporting requirements. Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of health standards for your drinking water. The monitoring period was 4/1/20 through 6/30/20. Sampling resumed on 2/22/21 and results showed no detection of SOCs. All PBUD customers were notified as per the public notice.

2020 WATER QUALITY TESTING DATA

01/01/20-12/31/20

RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS

TTHMS AND STAGE 1 DISINFECTANTS & DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

LEAD & COPPER HOME SAMPLING

PAGE 09

NOTE:

One sample during 2020 had a TTHM result of 84.2 ppb, which exceeds the MCL of 80 ppb. However, the system did not incur an MCL violation because all annual average results at all sites were at or below the MCL. Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

If you have questions regarding the data provided, you may contact Tim VanDeventer, Water Treatment Plant Superintendent, at 321-952-3410, extension 7078.

CONSERVATION

MISSION

PBUD's mission and commitment to promoting water conservation are dependent on the number of people reached every year. Practicing water conservation is essential, and we strive to reach out to all residents of Palm Bay and share information for our vital yet fragile resource; water.

The world has a minimal amount of freshwater available for consumption. Nearly 70% of the world is covered by water. However, only 2.5% of it is fresh, with the rest being saline and ocean-based. Just 1% of our freshwater is easily accessible, with much of it trapped in glaciers and snowfields. According to the latest U.S. Geological Survey, the United States uses 408 billion gallons of water per day. In Florida, each person uses up to 120 to 150 gallons of water per day. According to the World Resources Institute, global projections for potable water (consumable water) availability are becoming strained every year. It is exceedingly important to educate our communities as it relates to water conservation.

PAGE 10

KNOW YOUR

WATERING DAYS!

Watering Restrictions are established and enforced by the St. Johns River Water Management District. For residential customers, watering days are based on your house number (even or odd). You should only water before 10:00 a.m. and after 4:00 p.m. and foremost on your designated day(s).

November - March

(Water One Time per Week)

Designated Day Residential:

Saturday (Odd Address)

Sunday (Even Address)

Tuesday (Commercial)

March - November

(Water Two Times per Week)

Designated Days Residential:

Wednesday and Saturday (Odd Address)

Thursday and Sunday (Even Address)

Tuesday and Friday (Commercial)

CONSERVE

DRINK IT. ENJOY IT. DON'T WASTE IT.

PAGE 11

OUTDOOR

CONSERVATION

TIPS:

Outfit your hose with a shut-off nozzle that can be adjusted down to a fine spray so that water flows only as needed. When finished, turn the water off at the faucet instead of at the nozzle to avoid leaks.

Plant the right plant in the right place. Ask a landscape professional to help you choose native plants. Use drought-tolerant grass, shrubs, ground cover, and trees.

Using a hose to clean a driveway can waste hundreds of gallons of water. Use a blower or broom to clean leaves and other debris from these areas.

The grass is often your yard’s biggest water user. Save grass for areas where children or pets will play. In other areas, consider mulch, gravel, or ground cover.

Do not leave sprinklers or hoses unattended. Your garden hose can put out 600 gallons or more in only a few hours.

INDOOR

CONSERVATION

TIPS:

Check for leaks. Leaks can drip away 90 gallons a day or more from old fixtures such as leaky faucets.

Insulate your water pipes. You’ll get hot water faster, plus avoid wasting water while it heats.

Reuse household water instead of just pouring it down the drain; use it for watering a plant or garden or for cleaning.

Don’t let the water run while shaving, washing your face, or brushing your teeth.

Don’t use running water to thaw frozen foods. Instead, defrost overnight in the refrigerator or use the defrost setting on your microwave.

Store drinking water in the refrigerator rather than letting the tap run every time you want a cool glass of water.

EDUCATION & OUTREACH

PAGE 12

PBUD's commitment to sustainability is dependent on an active outreach and education program. Each year staff members visit local K-12 schools to educate young people about conservation, water and wastewater treatment, careers in the water industry, and how the department uses technology such as geographic information systems (GIS) to assist in day-to-day operations and decisions.

PBUD promotes the Drop Savers Water Conservation Poster Contest. This is a nationwide program supported by the American Water Works Association (AWWA) and locally by the Florida Section of the American Water Works Association (FSAWWA). This program allows students the ability to express their message of water conservation through art. Winners are selected and invited to the April City Council meeting, where the Mayor reads the proclamation announcing April as Water Conservation Month for the City of Palm Bay. The St. John's River Water Management District identifies Palm Bay as an active participant in Water Conservation Month via their website.

PBUD staff also provides information to the public at City events such as Palm Bay Play Day in April, Space Coast Waterfest in May, the City’s Independence Day celebration in July, and other events throughout the year.

During the school year, PBUD sponsors the WaterWise Conservation Program in several area schools. As part of the WaterWise program, students and teachers discuss the significance of water conservation through carefully designed lesson plans and in-classroom activities. Each student receives a WaterWise Resource Kit to take home, containing a high-efficiency showerhead, kitchen and bathroom sink aerators, and tools for monitoring water usage at home.

PBUD is a proud sponsor of the Academy of Environmental Water Technology (AEWT) program at Heritage High School which prepares and equips students to become future water professionals. In 2013, PBUD launched an internship pilot program with two students, and the program continues today with four students. Teaching today’s young people how to effectively manage our water resources and the value of clean, safe, reliable drinking water is imperative, and we are excited to partner with Heritage High School in this effort.

RESOURCES

WE LOVE FEEDBACK

We value our customers' opinions and would like to hear how you think we are doing. We welcome any suggestions you may have about how we can better serve the public. Visit www.pbud.org for more information.

STAY INFORMED

We encourage our customers to stay informed about their Palm Bay Utilities Department and the services we provide. There are several ways for customers and the public to receive updates and information; website, social media, e-notifications. We invite you to take advantage of these resources. Attending regularly scheduled Utilities Advisory Board and City Council meetings are encouraged to share suggestions, ideas, and concerns regarding the City’s municipal water and sewer systems.

City Council Meetings Council Chambers

120 Malabar Road SE

7:00 p.m. | 1st & 3rd Thursday of the month

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FOR MORE

INFORMATION

Palm Bay Utilities Department Customer Service

120 Malabar Road SE • Palm Bay, FL 32907

(321) 952-3420

Palm Bay Utilities Department

Administration

250 Osmosis Drive SE • Palm Bay, FL 32909

  1. 952-3410 www.pbud.org

Utilities After Hours Emergency Service

(Water & Sewer Issues Only)

(321) 952-3478

Community Outreach (321) 952-3410

Utilities Advisory Board

Utilities Administrative Office

250 Osmosis Drive SEWWW.PBUD.ORG 6:30 p.m. |Held Monthly

Contaminants


City of Palm Bay

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 114587
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Groundwater
  • Total: 17

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Arsenic
  • Chlorate
  • Chromium (hexavalent)
  • Radium%2C combined (-226 & -228)
  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Other Detected Contaminants

  • 1%2C4-Dioxane
  • Barium
  • Chromium (total)
  • Cyanide
  • Fluoride
  • Haloacetic acids (HAA5)
  • Manganese
  • Molybdenum
  • Nitrate
  • Nitrite
  • Strontium
  • Vanadium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

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