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Is Hayward Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 5:08 am, December 25, 2021
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Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Hayward?

Yes, Hayward's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Hayward has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however.

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from April 30, 2019 to June 30, 2022, Hayward's water utility, City of Hayward, had 0 violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. This assessment is based on the City of Hayward water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for Hayward Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in Hayward tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in Hayward's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

Hayward Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named City of Hayward for Hayward in California. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

Is there Lead in Hayward Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Hayward water system, City of Hayward, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.0016 mg/L of lead in Hayward water. This is 10.7% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Hayward contained more lead.

While Hayward water testing may have found 0.0016 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Hayward Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be at least one military base - Camp Parks - near Hayward with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Hayward has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
show details
Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
show details
Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
show details
Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
show details
Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
show details

For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Hayward Water - Frequently Asked Questions

HOW DO DRINKING WATER SOURCES BECOME POLLUTED?
Sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, oceans, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material. Water can also pick up substances from the presence of animal or human activity. Such substances are called contaminants and may be present in source water as: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife Inorganic contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife Pesticides and herbicides that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application and septic systems Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities The SFPUC regularly collects and tests water samples from reservoirs and designated sampling points throughout the sources and the transmission system to ensure that the water delivered to customers meets or exceeds federal and State drinking water standards. In 2020, the SFPUC conducted more than 47,200 drinking water tests in the sources and the transmission system. This is in addition to the extensive treatment process control monitoring performed by the SFPUC's certified operators and online instruments. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the SWRCB-DDW prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations and California law also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that provide the same protection for public health.
HOW DO I CONTACT HAYWARD CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Hayward water provider, City of Hayward, please use the information below.
By Phone: 510-583-4720
By Email: alex.ameri@hayward-ca.gov
By Mail: 777 B ST
HAYWARD, CA, 94541-5007
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR CITY OF HAYWARD
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their City of Hayward account to pay their Hayward water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your City of Hayward bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Hayward water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Hayward water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP HAYWARD WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Hayward means you will often need to put the water in your name with City of Hayward. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Hayward means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with City of Hayward. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

Is Hayward Tap Water Safe to Drink? Tap water & safety quality

The estimated price of bottled water

$2.17 in USD (1.5-liter)

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Hayward tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 17% Very Low
  • Water Pollution 25% Low
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 83% Very High
  • Water Quality 75% High

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Hayward, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Hayward Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from Hayward's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

2020WATER

QUALITY

REPORT

W W W . H A Y W A R D - C A . G O V | 7 7 7 B S T R E E T | ( 5 1 0 ) 5 8 3 - 4 7 0 0

OUR DRINKING WATER

The City of Hayward is pleased to present the 2020 Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report), which helps keep customers informed about where their drinking water comes from, how it is treated, and details about its quality.

The City of Hayward purchases all of its drinking water from the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). The quality of this water is regularly monitored by the SFPUC and the City of Hayward to ensure that it continues to meet and exceed all state and federal standards. Information regarding the findings of the 2020 water quality monitoring can be found in the following sections of this report.

Drinking Water Sources & Treatment

Hayward purchases its water supply from the SFPUC, which sources it from the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Comprised primarily of spring snowmelt straight from Yosemite National Park, the water Hayward delivers to its customers is among the cleanest in the world. It is exempt from filtration requirements by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the State Water Resources Control Board's Division of Drinking Water (SWRCB-DDW), but it receives the following treatment processes to ensure it meets the appropriate drinking water standards for consumption: ultraviolet light and chlorine disinfection, pH adjustment for optimum corrosion control, fluoridation for dental health protection, and chloramination for maintaining disinfectant residual and minimizing the formation of regulated disinfection byproducts.

In the past, the Hetch Hetchy-sourced water has been supplemented by surface water from local watersheds and upcountry non-Hetch Hetchy sources (UNHHS). This water is subject to filtration, disinfection, fluoridation, optimum corrosion control, and taste and odor removal to ensure it meets federal and state drinking water standards. However, in 2020, Hayward's water supply has been soley comprised of Hetch Hetchy water.

01

2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

Watershed Protection

Watershed sanitary surveys for the Hetch Hetchy source are conducted annually. For local water sources and UNHHS, surveys are conducted every five years. The latest sanitary surveys for the non-Hetch Hetchy watersheds were completed in 2021 for the years 2016 to 2020. The last UNHHS sanitary survey was conducted in 2015 as part of the SFPUC’s drought response plan efforts.

The purposes of the surveys are to evaluate the sanitary conditions and water quality of the watersheds and to review results of watershed management activities conducted in the preceding years. With support from partner agencies including the National Park Service and US Forest Service, these surveys identified that wildlife, stock, and human activities continue to be potential contamination sources. For a review of these reports, contact the SWRCB- DDW at (510) 620-3474.

Fluoridation and Dental Fluorosis

Mandated by State law, water fluoridation is a widely-accepted practice proven to be safe and effective for preventing and controlling tooth decay. The SFPUC's fluoride target level in the water is 0.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L, or part per million, ppm), consistent with the May 2015 State regulatory guidance on optimal fluoride level. Infants fed formula mixed with water containing fluoride at this level may still have a chance of developing tiny white lines or streaks in their teeth. These marks are referred to as mild to very mild fluorosis, and are often only visible under a microscope. Even in cases where the marks are visible, they do not pose any health risk. The Centers of Disease Control (CDC) considers it safe to use optimally fluoridated water for preparing infant formula. To lessen the chance of dental fluorosis, you may choose to use low-fluoride bottled water to prepare infant formula. Nevertheless, children may still develop dental fluorosis due to fluoride intake from other sources such as food, toothpaste and dental products.

Contact your healthcare provider or SWRCB-DDW if you have concerns about dental fluorosis. For additional information about fluoridation or oral health, visit the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/fluoridation.

02

2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

How Do Drinking Water Sources Become Polluted?

Sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, oceans, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material.

Water can also pick up substances from the presence of animal or human activity. Such substances are called contaminants and may be present in source water as:

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife

Inorganic contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife

Pesticides and herbicides that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application and septic

systems

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities

The SFPUC regularly collects and tests water samples from reservoirs and designated sampling points throughout the sources and the transmission system to ensure that the water delivered to customers meets or exceeds federal and State drinking water standards.

In 2020, the SFPUC conducted more than 47,200 drinking water tests in the sources and the transmission system. This is in addition to the extensive treatment process control monitoring performed by the SFPUC's certified operators and online instruments.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the SWRCB-DDW prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations and California law also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that provide the same protection for public health.

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2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

Drinking Water & Lead

Elevated levels of lead, if present, can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population.

Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. There are no known lead service lines in our water distribution system. The City of Hayward's policy is to remove and replace any lead user service lines promptly if it is discovered during pipeline repair and/or maintenance.

Plumbing components in homes may still contain lead materials. You can minimize your risk of potential lead exposure by identifying and removing lead materials in your home. Before drinking tap water, flush your tap for several minutes (or until the water temperature has changed) before using water for drinking or cooking. You can also use a filter certified by an American National Standards Institute accredited certifier to remove lead from drinking water.

If you are concerned about lead levels in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Additional information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the USEPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791, or at www.epa.gov/lead.

Who Should Seek Advice About Drinking Water?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Elderly, infants, and people with immune system disorders are particularly at risk from infections. These individuals and their caretakers should seek advice about drinking water from their healthcare providers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to reduce the risk of infection from Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the USEPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline, (800) 426-4791, or at www.epa.gov/safewater.

The City of Hayward regularly tests for lead in drinking water in compliance with the USEPA’s Lead and Copper Rule (LCR), which requires water agencies to test for lead at customer taps every three years. If lead concentrations exceed the Regulatory Action Level (AL) of 15 parts per billion in more than 10% of customer taps sampled, the agency must take action to notify the public and reduce corrosion of lead within the distribution system. Since the LCR’s inception in 1991, the City of Hayward has always been below the AL threshold for lead. The most recent lead sampling in Hayward was performed in 2016 and tested for lead in 59 residences, which were all below the AL.

In 2017, a new law passed that required water systems to test for lead in drinking water at all public K-12 school by July 1, 2019. The City of Hayward provides water to thirty-four public K-12 schools. All public school sites in Hayward were tested and sampling was completed on schedule. All sampling sites were below the AL for lead, with the exception of one school, where a single water fountain exceeded the standard. Corrective action was immediately taken to remove the non-conforming tap from service. Complete lead testing results are available online at www.waterboards.ca.gov/leadsamplinginschools.

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2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

WATER QUALITY

DATA

The following are definitions of key terms referring to standards and goals of water quality noted on the data table on Page 6:

Public Health Goal (PHG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. PHGs are set by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set by the USEPA.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs or MCLGs as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCLs (SMCLs) are set to protect the odor, taste, and appearance of drinking water.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS): MCLs and MRDLs for contaminants that affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Turbidity: A water clarity indicator that measures cloudiness of the water, and is also used to indicate the effectiveness of the filtration system. High turbidity can hinder the effectiveness of disinfectants.

Cryptosporidium is a parasitic microbe found in most surface water. We regularly test for this waterborne pathogen and found it at very low levels in source water and treated water in 2020. However, current test methods approved by the USEPA do not distinguish between dead organisms and those capable of causing disease. Ingestion of cryptosporidium may produce symptoms of nausea, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches. Cryptosporidium must be ingested to cause disease, and it may be spread through means other than drinking water.

The table below lists all drinking water contaminants detected in 2020 and the information about their typical sources. Contaminants below detection limits for reporting are not shown in accordance with regulatory guidance. The SFPUC holds a SWRCB-DDW monitoring waiver for some contaminants in its surface water supply and therefore the associated monitoring frequencies are less than annual.

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2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

City of Hayward - Water Quality Data for Year 2020 (1)

Detected Contaminants

Unit

MCL

PHG

Range or Level

 

Average

Major Sources in Drinking Water

or (MCLG)

Found

 

or [Max]

 

 

 

 

 

 

TURBIDITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unfiltered Hetch Hetchy Water

NTU

5

N/A

0.3 - 0.7 (2)

[2.1]

Soil runoff

 

NTU

1 (3)

N/A

-

[1]

Soil runoff

Filtered Water from Sunol Valley Water

 

Min 95% of samples

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treatment Plant (SVWTP)

-

N/A

99.8% - 100%

-

Soil runoff

≤ 0.3 NTU (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NTU

1 (3)

N/A

-

[0.1]

Soil runoff

Filtered Water from Harry Tracy Water

 

Min 95% of samples

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treatment Plant (HTWTP)

-

N/A

100%

-

Soil runoff

≤ 0.3 NTU (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS AND PRECURSOR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Trihalomethanes

ppb

80

N/A

15.6 - 53.7

34.4 (4)

Byproduct

of drinking water disinfection

Haloacetic Acids

ppb

60

N/A

7.4 - 31.0

21.7 (4)

Byproduct

of drinking water disinfection

Total Organic Carbon (5)

ppm

TT

N/A

1.6 - 2.6

2.1

Various

natural and man-made sources

MICROBIOLOGICAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Coliform (6)

-

NoP ≤ 5.0% of

(0)

-

< 5.0%

Naturally

present in the environment

 

 

monthly samples

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giardia lamblia

cyst/L

TT

(0)

0 - 0.05

0.01

Naturall

y present in the environment

INORGANICS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fluoride (source water) (7)

ppm

2.0

1

ND - 0.7

0.3 (8)

Erosion

of natural deposits; water additive to promote strong teeth

Chloramine (as chlorine )

ppm

MRDL = 4.0

MRDLG = 4

0.0 - 3.3

2.7 (9)

Drinking

water disinfectant added for treatment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constituents with Secondary Standards

Unit

SMCL

PHG

Range

 

Average

Major Sources of Contaminant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chloride

ppm

500

N/A

<3 - 15

8.7

Runoff / leaching from natural deposits

Specific Conductance

μS/cm

1,600

N/A

32 - 234

160

Substances that form ions when in water

Sulfate

ppm

500

N/A

1 - 34

17

Runoff / leaching from natural deposits

Total Dissolved Solids

ppm

1,000

N/A

<20 - 137

72

Runoff / leaching from natural deposits

Turbidity

NTU

5

N/A

ND - 0.2

 

ND

Soil runoff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lead & Copper

Unit

AL

PHG

Range

 

90th

Major Sources in Drinking Water

 

Percentile

Copper

ppb

1,300

300

1.1 - 906 (10)

56.6

Internal

corrosion of household water plumbing systems

Lead

ppb

15

0.2

<1.0 - 32.1 (10)

2.3

Internal

corrosion of household water plumbing systems

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Water Quality Parameters

Unit

ORL

Range

Average

 

 

 

 

 

Alkalinity (as CaCO3)

ppm

N/A

6.7 - 138

55

Calcium (as Ca)

ppm

N/A

2.9 - 22

12

Chlorate (11)

ppb

800 (NL)

67 - 1,200

262

Hardness (as CaCO3)

ppm

N/A

8.0 - 79

45

Magnesium

ppm

N/A

0.2 - 6.8

4

pH

-

N/A

8.6. - 9.8

9

Potassium

ppm

N/A

0.3 - 1.3

1

Silica

ppm

N/A

2.8 - 7

5

Sodium

ppm

N/A

2.4 - 22

14

Strontium

ppb

N/A

14 - 242

110

KEY:

< / ≤

=

less than / less than or equal to

AL

= Action Level

Max

= Maximum

Min

= Minimum

N/A

= Not Available

ND

= Non-detect

NL

=

Notification Level

NoP

=

Number of Coliform-Positive Sample

NTU

=

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit

ORL

=

Other Regulatory Level

pCi/L

=

picocurie per liter

ppb

=

part per billion

ppm

=

part per million

μS/cm =

microSiemens/centimeter

Footnotes:

  1. All results met State and Federal drinking water health standards.
  2. These are monthly average turbidity values measured every 4 hours daily.
  3. There is no turbidity MCL for filtered water. The limits are based on the TT requirements for filtration systems.
  4. This is the highest locational running annual average value.
  5. Total organic carbon is a precursor for disinfection byproduct formation. The TT requirement applies to the filtered water from the SVWTP only.
  6. Percent of monthly samples that are positive in Hayward tap water. There was no E. Coli positive samples collected in 2020.
  7. The San Francisco Regional Water System recommended an optimal fluoride level of 0.7 ppm be maintained in the treated water. In 2020, the range and average of the fluoride levels were 0.6 ppm - 0.9 ppm and 0.7 ppm, respectively.
  8. The natural fluoride level in the Hetch Hetchy supply was ND. Elevated fluoride levels in the SVWTP and HTWTP raw water are attributed to the transfer of fluoridated Hetch Hetchy water into the local reservoirs.
  9. This is the highest running annual average value.
  10. The 90th percentile level of lead and copper must be less than the action level. The most recent Lead and Copper Rule monitoring was in 2016. In 2016, 0 of 59 sampled residences exceeded the Action Level at customer taps for copper, and 2 out of 59 sampled exceeded the Action Level at customer taps for lead.
  11. The detected chlorate in the treated water is a degradation product of sodium hypochlorite used by the San Francisco Regional Water System for water disinfection.

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2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

WATER CONSERVATION & SUSTAINABILITY

The City of Hayward believes water is one of our most precious resources and is dedicated to water conservation. As of May 10, 2021, Governor Newsom expanded his Drought Proclamation with a total of 41 counties now under a targeted State of Emergency due to drought. As California enters the summer season after an especially dry and warm winter season, the City of Hayward remains vigilant in using water wisely. In an effort to assist our residents and businesses to conserve water, the City of Hayward offers the following water conservation programs:

Free low-flow water fixtures: Pick up low-flow faucet aerators and showerheads at our office at Hayward City Hall, 777 B Street, from 8 AM to 5 PM, Monday to Friday. These water fixtures are provided at no cost to residents. Please email utilities.administration@hayward-ca.gov with your request.

Rebate programs: The City of Hayward offers a variety of rebate programs to encourage water conservation, including lawn conversions and rain barrel rebates. For more information and to learn how to apply for rebates, visit our website at: www.hayward-ca.gov/water-conservation.

Free sustainability-focused landscaping classes: Every spring and fall, the City of Hayward hosts free landscaping classes via Zoom. Classes provide instruction for a variety of topics, including sustainable garden design, lawn conversion, water-efficient irrigation systems, and composting. For more information on upcoming classes, visit www.bawsca.org/classes. To be on the email list for notifications of upcoming classes hosted by Hayward, email utilities.administration@hayward-ca.gov with your request.

EarthCapades: The City of Hayward offers school assemblies, free-of-charge, to schools to increase student awareness of water conversation.

EarthCapades performances combine age-appropriate state science standards with circus skills, juggling, music, storytelling, comedy, and audience participation to teach environmental awareness, water science and conservation.

WaterWise School Education Program:

Through this program, “water conservation kits” are distributed to 5th grade students to empower them to install water-saving devices and perform a water audit in their home. The kit includes high-efficiency shower heads, low-flow faucet aerators, an energy cost calculator, a flow rate test bags, a toilet leak detection kit, and more. The water conservation curriculum can be easily implemented by teachers and includes methods to quantify the water savings as a result of taking the actions in the curriculum.

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2020 WATER QUALITY REPORT

The Hayward City Council is the governing authority of the Hayward Water System. City Council meets the first, third, and fourth Tuesday every month at 7 PM at Hayward City Hall, 777 B Street. Currently, City Council meetings are held remotely via Zoom.

The SFPUC is the governing authority of the wholesale water system that supplies water to Hayward. SFPUC meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at 1:30 PM at San Francisco City Hall, Room 400. The public is invited to participate in these meetings.

If you would like more information regarding the City of Hayward Water Distribution system, or would like to contact our office, please contact:

City of Hayward, Public Works & Utilities

777 B Street

Hayward, CA 94541

  1. 583-4700
    utilities.administration@hayward-ca.gov

We also provide additional information on our website at www.hayward-ca.gov/wq

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua potable. Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

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Contaminants


City of Hayward

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the California State Water Resources Control Board, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 146398
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Purchased surface water
  • Total: 10

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Other Detected Contaminants

  • Aluminum*
  • Bromide*
  • Chlorate
  • Chromium (hexavalent)
  • Fluoride*
  • Haloacetic acids (HAA5)
  • Molybdenum*
  • Strontium
  • Vanadium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

Hayward California Tap Water

The City of Hayward, California, has a lot to be thankful for. For starters, their drinking water is excellent! And since we are talking about the quality of tap water, we’re also talking about Hayward’s water treatment system known as the City of Hayward Water Treatment Center. For as long as there have been plumbers in Hayward, California, they’ve learned how to treat our water and keep it clean and healthy.

You might be wondering how the City of Hayward came up with such innovative and efficient technology for purifying water? Well, it all begins with one man…headwater collector! When you think of someone responsible for cleaning out the dirty pipes in your home or business, you probably think of someone with a heavy-duty job. But this is not your typical plumber; he’s much more creative than that. The headwater collector takes on the responsibility of keeping the water flowing throughout the house, keeping it from being corrupted by dirt and debris, and delivering a consistently reliable source of clean, fresh water for you and your family.

If you own a home in the City of Hayward, you already know that your tap water doesn’t exactly shine. That’s because it’s full of pollutants from all sorts of sources – oils, grease, insecticides, and more – that make it taste bad and smell nasty. But with the City of Hayward’s comprehensive water filtration system, you can rest assured that every drop of water is fresh, clean, and delicious, and that means a lot to you and your family. So whether you want to use a filtration system for your entire home or have it installed in one or two rooms, you’re in good hands with the professionals at Hayward.

Hayward California Drinking Water

Hayward, California drinking water is pretty good. It does not get bad until it freezes. But for all of the good this city has to offer, there are plenty of things to complain about. People seem to be very bothered about the amount of plastic bags they use to dispose of their water. If you live in the area and use tap water, this is a big deal because you need to make sure that you throw away plastic bags when you empty your fridge. It’s also a good idea to use glass bottles whenever possible to not have to throw the bottle down the drain.

You can easily buy bottled water at any supermarket or convenience store if you wish to skip the fresh bottle. Of course, there is also the option of using an entire house filtration system to clean your drinking water. The filter takes out many of the harmful substances from the tap, but sometimes it can remove too much. Sometimes there is not enough pressure in the system to remove everything. For this reason, it is a good idea to have a professional come out and test the water to make sure there is no damage.

Another thing that some people are bothered about is the amount of chlorine in the water. Chlorine is added to disinfect water. The levels are usually very high, especially in the spring when it is hard to keep the algae growth down. Although the levels can be lowered naturally, it is still best to avoid it as much as possible. Water purified with a reverse osmosis step can also be used as a water source for cooking purposes.

Hayward California Drinking Water Quality

The Hayward California drinking water quality is of excellent quality, according to the reports. This city is located on the foothills of the Sierra Nevadas Mountains, just east of Los Angeles. The average rainfall per year is around 9 inches. This area receives much of its drinking water from the city of California. The main pipe feeds it in the town of Hayward, which is a major plastic-bottle producer. The quality of this water is so good that it is served to millions of households in the United States and worldwide.

There have been some instances of contamination in the drinking water of California. This has happened because of the overuse of plastic bottles, making the water unsafe for drinking when we use it for more extended periods. The dumping of chemicals and the washing of non-stick utensils with harsh detergents also contaminates the water, making it unfit for drinking. These cases, however, are few and far between.

The drinking water of the city of Hayward is treated very carefully to retain its quality and purity. It undergoes a meticulous process before it is released into the environment. Water is chlorinated at different stages in the treatment facility, the primary one being the filtration of sediments and suspended solids. After this, the water is further treated using ultraviolet rays, carbon filtration, ion exchange, and other processes. All these processes go on to maintain the high quality and purity of this drinking water.

Hayward California Water Utility

Hayward, California water utility is one of the largest water providers in the San Fernando Valley. A company that serves more than three hundred thousand customers also supplies a great deal to surrounding areas. Its two transmission lines and one main cable provide a good amount of water for farming and industry. The company also has connections with some of the most prominent players in the water utility business, including the Southern California Gas and Electric Company and the Los Angeles Water Company.

According to their website, Hayward California water utility offers services to residential and commercial customers in the San Fernando Valley. Its portfolio of water services includes over one hundred water treatment centers and nearly one hundred storage tanks. They have advanced technology and a good customer service record, so you can be sure that you will get good service from them. Regarding residential customers, they offer about thirty-two different water treatment centers, which can handle all the water needs for a typical family.

On the other hand, their service area extends to Inglewood, Burbank, Glendale, West Hollywood, Carson Ca, Rosemont, Carson Ca, and Fullerton. When it comes to commercial accounts, they provide water service to many businesses like hotels, motels, shopping malls, and the likes. Their water service is even available to sports arenas and the like. In short, there is no shortage of water in this company, so you can be sure that you will always get the right amount of water for your use. If you want to contact them, all you need to do is call their toll-free number and ask any question regarding your water supply.

Hayward California Water Source

The City of Hayward is located on the beautiful California coast, between the San Pablo Bay and the Pacific Ocean. Hayward is a popular tourist destination because it offers many outdoor activities, such as sailing, boating, surfing, and other water sports. A good number of these activities take place in the magnificent lakefront parks of the downtown area. In addition to being a beautiful part of a city, the lake provides a natural water source for many of the town’s residents. There are three significant public water sources located downtown and along the lakeshore. They all serve various purposes.

The most popular of these sources is the City of Hayward itself. This water source serves several different functions, including providing recreation and entertainment for the entire community. The main waterway runs through the City of Hayward, providing a canal for cars and trucks to cross while traveling up and down the lakeshore. Other channels allow for barges and small boats to access the waterway as well.

Along with the main waterway, several smaller canals connect the downtown area with the lake itself. The City of Hayward maintains these smaller canals, and they serve as walking trails and dog parks for the residents. Most importantly, the water that flows through these canals has been filtered and treated to make it safe for drinking and recreational purposes. This makes the City of Hayward, California water source, one of the best places to live or visit.

 

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