Layer 1

Is Port St. Lucie Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 7:47 pm, July 22, 2022
+

Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Port St. Lucie?

Yes, Port St. Lucie's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Port St. Lucie has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. To find more recent info we might have, you can check out our boil water notice page or the city's water provider website.

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from April 30, 2019 to June 30, 2022, Port St. Lucie's water utility, Port St Lucie Utilities, had 3 non-health-based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. This assessment is based on the Port St Lucie Utilities water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for Port St. Lucie Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in Port St. Lucie tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in Port St. Lucie's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

Port St. Lucie Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named Port St Lucie Utilities for Port St. Lucie in Florida. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

For the compliance period beginning Sept. 1, 2021, Port St. Lucie had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Reporting Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Reporting, Assessment Forms (RTCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Revised Total Coliform Rule.

For the compliance period beginning July 1, 2019, Port St. Lucie had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Reporting Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Reporting, Assessment Forms (RTCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Revised Total Coliform Rule.

For the compliance period beginning June 1, 2019, Port St. Lucie had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Reporting Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Reporting, Assessment Forms (RTCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Revised Total Coliform Rule.

Is there Lead in Port St. Lucie Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Port St. Lucie water system, Port St Lucie Utilities, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.0019 mg/L of lead in Port St. Lucie water. This is 12.7% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Port St. Lucie contained more lead.

While Port St. Lucie water testing may have found 0.0019 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Port St. Lucie Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be no military bases near Port St. Lucie with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Port St. Lucie has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

Port St. Lucie SDWA Violation History Table - Prior 10 Years

Compliance Period Status Health-Based? Category Code Code Rule Code Contaminant Code Rule Group Code Rule Family Code
09/01/2021 - Resolved No Reporting Violation (RPT) Reporting, Assessment Forms (RTCR) (4A) Revised Total Coliform Rule (111) Revised Total Coliform Rule (8000) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
07/01/2019 - Resolved No Reporting Violation (RPT) Reporting, Assessment Forms (RTCR) (4A) Revised Total Coliform Rule (111) Revised Total Coliform Rule (8000) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
06/01/2019 - Resolved No Reporting Violation (RPT) Reporting, Assessment Forms (RTCR) (4A) Revised Total Coliform Rule (111) Revised Total Coliform Rule (8000) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
show details
Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
show details
Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
show details
Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
show details
Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
show details

For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Port St. Lucie Water - Frequently Asked Questions

WHERE DOES YOUR WATER COME FROM?
7KH&LW\¶VZDWHUVXSSO\FRPHVIURPWZR LQGHSHQGHQWVRXUFHVWKHVKDOORZDTXLIHUDQGWKH GHHSHU)ORULGDQDTXLIHU5DZZDWHUIURPWKHVKDOORZ DTXLIHUZKLFKLVDERXWIHHWGHHSLVWUHDWHGE\ DQPLOOLRQJDOORQSHUGD\OLPHVRIWHQLQJIDFLOLW\ 7KLVSURFHVVLVDFRPELQDWLRQRIS+DGMXVWPHQWV ZLWKOLPHFRDJXODWLRQZLWKDSRO\PHUPXOWLPHGLD ¿OWUDWLRQDQGGLVLQIHFWLRQZLWKFKORUDPLQHV7KH GHHSHU)ORULGDQDTXLIHUZKLFKLVDERXWIHHW GHHSLVWUHDWHGE\DQPLOOLRQJDOORQSHUGD\ DQGDPLOOLRQJDOORQSHUGD\UHYHUVHRVPRVLV IDFLOLWLHV%RWK¿QLVKHGZDWHUVDUHEOHQGHGS+ DGMXVWHGGLVLQIHFWHGDQGÀXRULGHLVDGGHG 7KHVRXUFHVRIGULQNLQJZDWHU ERWKWDSZDWHUDQG ERWWOHGZDWHU LQFOXGHVULYHUVODNHVVWUHDPV SRQGVUHVHUYRLUVVSULQJVDQGZHOOV$VZDWHU WUDYHOVRYHUWKHVXUIDFHRIWKHODQGRUWKURXJKWKH JURXQGLWGLVVROYHVQDWXUDOO\RFFXUULQJPLQHUDOV DQGLQVRPHFDVHVUDGLRDFWLYHPDWHULDODQGFDQ SLFNXSVXEVWDQFHVUHVXOWLQJIURPWKHSUHVHQFHRI DQLPDOVRUIURPKXPDQDFWLYLW\
HOW SAFE IS OUR WATER?
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ryptosporidium and GRHVQRWQHFHVVDULO\LQGLFDWHWKDWWKHZDWHUSRVHVD RWKHUPLFURELRORJLFDOFRQWDPLQDQWVDUHDYDLODEOHIURP KHDOWKULVN0RUHLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWFRQWDPLQDQWVDQG WKH6DIH'ULQNLQJ:DWHU+RWOLQHDW SRWHQWLDOKHDOWKHIIHFWVFDQEHREWDLQHGE\FDOOLQJWKH (QYLURQPHQWDO3URWHFWLRQ$JHQF\¶V6DIH'ULQNLQJ:DWHU ,QWKH)ORULGD'HSDUWPHQWRI(QYLURQPHQWDO +RWOLQHDW3URWHFWLRQ )'(3 SHUIRUPHGD6RXUFH:DWHU $VVHVVPHQWRIWKH&LW\¶VZDWHUVXSSO\V\VWHPWRLGHQWLI\ ,QDGGLWLRQLISUHVHQWHOHYDWHGOHYHOVRIOHDGFDQDQ\SRWHQWLDOVRXUFHVRIFRQWDPLQDWLRQLQWKHYLFLQLW\RI FDXVHVHULRXVKHDOWKSUREOHPVHVSHFLDOO\IRUSUHJQDQW RXUZHOOV6HYHQSRWHQWLDOVRXUFHVRIFRQWDPLQDWLRQWKDW ZRPHQDQG\RXQJFKLOGUHQ/HDGLQGULQNLQJZDWHULV ZHUHLGHQWL¿HGIRUWKLVV\VWHPKDYHDORZVXVFHSWLELOLW\ SULPDULO\IURPPDWHULDOVDQGFRPSRQHQWVDVVRFLDWHG OHYHO,WVKRXOGEHQRWHGWKDWWKHSRWHQWLDOVRXUFHVRI ZLWKVHUYLFHOLQHVDQGKRPHSOXPELQJ7KH&LW\RI3RUW FRQWDPLQDWLRQLGHQWL¿HGE\WKLVDVVHVVPHQWDUHMXVW 6W/XFLH8WLOLW\6\VWHPV'HSDUWPHQWLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRU WKDWSRWHQWLDOVRXUFHV$OORI3RUW6W/XFLH¶VZDWHU SURYLGLQJKLJKTXDOLW\GULQNLQJZDWHUEXWFDQQRWFRQWURO VXSSO\IDFLOLWLHVDUHUHJXODWHGDQGRSHUDWHXQGHU WKHYDULHW\RIPDWHULDOVXVHGLQSOXPELQJFRPSRQHQWV VWULQJHQWFRQVWUXFWLRQDQGPDLQWHQDQFHVWDQGDUGV :KHQ\RXUZDWHUKDVEHHQVLWWLQJIRUVHYHUDOKRXUV\RX WRSURWHFWERWKKXPDQKHDOWKDQGWKHHQYLURQPHQW FDQPLQLPL]HWKHSRWHQWLDOIRUOHDGH[SRVXUHE\ÀXVKLQJ 7KHSXUSRVHRI)'(3FRQGXFWLQJWKHVRXUFHZDWHU \RXUWDSIRUVHFRQGVWRPLQXWHVEHIRUHXVLQJZDWHU DVVHVVPHQWVZDVWRGHWHUPLQHLIDQ\DFWLRQVDUHQHHGHG IRUGULQNLQJRUFRRNLQJ,I\RXDUHFRQFHUQHGDERXWWRUHGXFHFXUUHQWULVNVWRDYRLGIXWXUHSUREOHPV1R OHDGLQ\RXUZDWHU\RXPD\ZLVKWRKDYH\RXUZDWHU DFWLRQVZHUHUHFRPPHQGHG7KHDVVHVVPHQWUHVXOWVDUH WHVWHG,QIRUPDWLRQRQOHDGLQGULQNLQJZDWHUWHVWLQJ DYDLODEOHRQWKH)'(36RXUFH:DWHU$VVHVVPHQWDQG PHWKRGVDQGVWHSV\RXFDQWDNHWRPLQLPL]HH[SRVXUH 3URWHFWLRQ3URJUDPZHEVLWHDWKWWSVÀGHSGHSVWDWH LVDYDLODEOHIURPWKH6DIH'ULQNLQJ:DWHU+RWOLQHRUDW À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¿UVW,I\RX¶GOLNHWROHDUQPRUHDERXWKHOSLQJWRSURWHFWWKHTXDOLW\RIGULQNLQJZDWHU FDOOXVDWIRUIXUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQDERXWZD\V\RXFDQKHOS
HOW DO I CONTACT PORT ST. LUCIE CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Port St. Lucie water provider, Port St Lucie Utilities, please use the information below.
By Phone: 772-873-6400
By Mail: 900 SE OGDEN LANE
PORT ST LUCIE, FL, 34983
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR PORT ST LUCIE UTILITIES
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their Port St Lucie Utilities account to pay their Port St. Lucie water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your Port St Lucie Utilities bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Port St. Lucie water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Port St. Lucie water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP PORT ST. LUCIE WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Port St. Lucie means you will often need to put the water in your name with Port St Lucie Utilities. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Port St. Lucie means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with Port St Lucie Utilities. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

Is Port St. Lucie Tap Water Safe to Drink? Tap water & safety quality

The estimated price of bottled water

$3.58 in USD (1.5-liter)

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Port St. Lucie tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 33% Low
  • Water Pollution 55% Moderate
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 67% High
  • Water Quality 45% Moderate

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Port St. Lucie, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Port St. Lucie Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from Port St. Lucie's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

Water Quality Report

2 0 2 0

City of Port St. Lucie

Utility Systems Department

121 SW Port St. Lucie Blvd., Port St. Lucie, FL 34984

utility.cityofpsl.com

772-873-6400

A Message from the Director

We are pleased to again provide you an opportunity to review our &RQVXPHU&RQ¿GHQFH5HSRUW &&5 

ZKLFKRIIHUVGHWDLOVDERXWWKHTXDOLW\

RIWKH&LW\RI3RUW6W/XFLH¶VSRWDEOH

ZDWHU7KLVUHSRUWLVSXEOLVKHGLQ

FRPSOLDQFHZLWK)HGHUDOOHJLVODWLRQ

DQGIRUWKHPRVWSDUWUHÀHFWV

UHVXOWVRIWKHVDPSOLQJDQGWHVWLQJ

FRQGXFWHGEHWZHHQ-DQXDU\

DQG'HFHPEHU

7KLVUHSRUWLVDZRQGHUIXORSSRUWXQLW\WRUHYLHZRXU

WHVWLQJUHVXOWVDQGWKHTXDOLW\RIRXUZDWHU%XWZKDW

GRHVZDWHUTXDOLW\PHDQ"7RXVLWPHDQVSURYLGLQJ

FOHDQVDIHJUHDWWDVWLQJZDWHUWKDWLVUHJXODUO\WHVWHG

DQGFRQVLVWHQWO\LQFRPSOLDQFHZLWKWKHVWULFWJXLGHOLQHV SODFHGXSRQXVE\WKH(QYLURQPHQWDO3URWHFWLRQ$JHQF\ (3$ 

:DWHUTXDOLW\PHDQVWKDWRQFHWKHZDWHUOHDYHV

RXUWUHDWPHQWSODQWVDQGHQWHUVRYHUPLOHV RIGLVWULEXWLRQV\VWHPLWFRQWLQXHVWRPHHW(3$ JXLGHOLQHV)RURYHU\HDUV8WLOLW\6\VWHPVKDV

PDLQWDLQHGWKHZDWHUGLVWULEXWLRQV\VWHPDQGSURYLGHG

H[FHOOHQWVHUYLFHIRURXUJURZLQJSRSXODWLRQ

%XWKRZGR\RXNQRZ\RX¶UHJHWWLQJWKHEHVWZDWHU

TXDOLW\DW\RXUKRPH",VVXHVPD\DULVHWKDWKDYH\RX

TXHVWLRQLQJWKHTXDOLW\RI\RXUZDWHU7KLQJVOLNHWKH

VPHOORUWDVWHRI\RXUZDWHURUWKHSLQNPROGLQ\RXU

WRLOHWRUEODFNUHVLGXHRQ\RXUIDXFHW7KHVHDUHLVVXHV

WKDWFDQHDVLO\EH¿[HG\HWKDYHQRWKLQJWRGRZLWKWKH

DFWXDOTXDOLW\RI\RXUZDWHU

)RULQVWDQFHLI\RXUHWXUQKRPHDIWHUDORQJDEVHQFH

DQG\RXUZDWHUVPHOOVDQGGRHVQ¶WWDVWHJRRGZH

UHFRPPHQGUXQQLQJWKHZDWHULQ\RXUEDWKWXEIRU

DSSUR[LPDWHO\PLQXWHVWRPRYHDODUJHYROXPHRI

ZDWHUWKURXJKWKHSLSHVWRÀXVKRXWDQ\ZDWHUWKDWKDV

EHHQVLWWLQJVWDJQDQW

,I\RXUZDWHUVPHOOVOLNHURWWHQHJJVLW¶VFDXVHGE\

VXOIDWHUHGXFLQJEDFWHULDWKDWKDYHWDNHQKROGLQWKH

ZDWHUGXHWRVWDJQDQWÀRZFRQGLWLRQVDQGGLVVLSDWHG

FKORULQH7KHVXOIDWHLVFRQYHUWHGWRK\GURJHQVXO¿GH

DJDVWKDWVPHOOVOLNHURWWHQHJJV,IWKHVPHOOSHUVLVWV

DIWHUUXQQLQJWKHZDWHULQ\RXUEDWKWXEIRUVHYHUDO

PLQXWHVWKHSUREOHPPD\EHLQ\RXUZDWHUKHDWHU

<RXFDQGHWHUPLQHLI\RXUZDWHUKHDWHULVWKHFDXVHE\

WDNLQJWKHIROORZLQJVWHSV

  • 5XQWKHFROGZDWHUIRUWRPLQXWHV VLQJOHKDQGHG
    IDXFHWVKDYHWREHDOOWKHZD\RQFROG 
  • )LOODJODVVZLWKWKHFROGZDWHUDQGVPHOOLW7KHZDWHU
    PD\KDYHDVOLJKWFKORULQHRGRU
  • )LOODJODVVZLWKKRWZDWHUDQGVPHOOLW
  • ,IWKHKRWZDWHUVPHOOVOLNHURWWHQHJJVWKHSUREOHP
    LVLQ\RXUZDWHUKHDWHU
  • &RQVXOWWKHZDWHUKHDWHURZQHU¶VPDQXDOWR
    OHDUQPRUHDERXWWKHPDQXIDFWXUHU¶VÀXVKLQJ
    UHFRPPHQGDWLRQV

)OXVKLQJWKHZDWHUKHDWHULVWKHVLPSOHVWZD\WR

HOLPLQDWHWKHSUREOHP,WFDQDOVRHQKDQFHLWVHI¿FLHQF\

DQGSURORQJLWVOLIH

,IDSLQNULQJIRUPVDURXQGWKHZDWHUOLQHLQ\RXUWRLOHW

DEDFWHULDFDOOHG6HUUDWLDPDUFHVFHQVLVWREODPH,W

WKULYHVLQPRLVWSODFHVZKLFKLVZK\LWVKRZVXSLQ

EDWKURRPV

*HWULGRIWKHULQJE\IROORZLQJWKHVHVWHSV

  • 6TXLUWWRLOHWERZOFOHDQHULQWRWKHERZODURXQGWKH
    ULP
  • /HWFOHDQHUVLWIRUDIHZPLQXWHV
  • 6FUXEZLWKDVRIWWRLOHWEUXVK
  • 5HSHDWDVQHHGHG

<RXPLJKWQRWLFHWKLVVDPHSLQNULQJLQ\RXUSHW¶V

ZDWHUGLVKRULQ\RXUVKRZHURUEDWKWXE,W¶VWKHVDPH

EDFWHULDWKULYLQJLQWKRVHPRLVWSODFHV

/DVWO\WKHEODFNUHVLGXH\RXPLJKWVHHLQ\RXUIDXFHWV

DQGVKRZHUKHDGVLVDQDWXUDOO\RFFXUULQJPROGRUIXQJL

,WLVSUHVHQWLQPRLVWOHDYHVVRLODQGPXOFK7KHVSRUHV

HQWHU\RXUKRPHWKURXJKRSHQGRRUVDQGZLQGRZV

(YHQ\RXDQG\RXUSHWFDQEULQJWKHVSRUHVLQRQ

FORWKLQJDQGIXU

0XFKOLNHWKH6HUUDWLDPDUFHVFHQVEDFWHULDWKDWFDXVHV

WKHSLQNULQJLQ\RXUWRLOHWWKLVPROGWKULYHVLQPRLVW

GDUNHQYLURQPHQWVZKHUHWKHUHLVOLWWOHDLUÀRZDQG

FRQVWDQWGDPSQHVV7KHPROGDSSHDUVRQVKRZHU

KHDGVDQGIDXFHWVVKRZHUFXUWDLQVDQGUHXVDEOHZDWHU

ERWWOHV

<RXPLJKWDOVRVHHLWXQGHUWKHÀXVKLQJULPRIWKH

WRLOHW,WFDQHDVLO\EHFRQWUROOHGE\WDNLQJWKHIROORZLQJ

VWHSV

  • 3RXUFXSRIEOHDFKLQWRWKHWRLOHWWDQN
  • )OXVKWKHWRLOHW

7KLVFKORULQDWHVWKHLQVLGHRIWKHULQJZKHUHWKHWRLOHW

VFUXEELQJEUXVKFDQ¶WUHDFK

7KLVPROGZLOOQRWVXUYLYHLQRXUZDWHUDQGLVQRW

SUHVHQWLQRXUGULQNLQJZDWHU

$JDLQ3RUW6W/XFLH¶V8WLOLW\6\VWHPV'HSDUWPHQWLV FRPPLWWHGWRGHSHQGDEO\SURYLGLQJDVXSSO\RIFOHDQ VDIHDQGJUHDWWDVWLQJGULQNLQJZDWHUWRHDFKRIRXU PRUHWKDQFXVWRPHUV+RZHYHUWKHPRVW

LPSRUWDQWPHVVDJHLQWKLVGRFXPHQWLVWKHIDFWWKDW

WKHGULQNLQJZDWHUSURYLGHGE\WKH3RUW6W/XFLH8WLOLW\

6\VWHPV'HSDUWPHQWFRQWLQXHVWRPHHWDOO)HGHUDODQG

6WDWHUHTXLUHPHQWV

,I\RXQHHGPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWWKLVUHSRUWRURXU

VHUYLFHVSOHDVHFDOO

%UDG0DFHN'LUHFWRURI8WLOLW\6\VWHPV

Water Quality Report 2020

Where does your water come from?

7KH&LW\¶VZDWHUVXSSO\FRPHVIURPWZR

LQGHSHQGHQWVRXUFHVWKHVKDOORZDTXLIHUDQGWKH

GHHSHU)ORULGDQDTXLIHU5DZZDWHUIURPWKHVKDOORZ

DTXLIHUZKLFKLVDERXWIHHWGHHSLVWUHDWHGE\

DQPLOOLRQJDOORQSHUGD\OLPHVRIWHQLQJIDFLOLW\

7KLVSURFHVVLVDFRPELQDWLRQRIS+DGMXVWPHQWV

ZLWKOLPHFRDJXODWLRQZLWKDSRO\PHUPXOWLPHGLD

¿OWUDWLRQDQGGLVLQIHFWLRQZLWKFKORUDPLQHV7KH

GHHSHU)ORULGDQDTXLIHUZKLFKLVDERXWIHHW

GHHSLVWUHDWHGE\DQPLOOLRQJDOORQSHUGD\

DQGDPLOOLRQJDOORQSHUGD\UHYHUVHRVPRVLV

IDFLOLWLHV%RWK¿QLVKHGZDWHUVDUHEOHQGHGS+

DGMXVWHGGLVLQIHFWHGDQGÀXRULGHLVDGGHG

7KHVRXUFHVRIGULQNLQJZDWHU ERWKWDSZDWHUDQG

ERWWOHGZDWHU LQFOXGHVULYHUVODNHVVWUHDPV SRQGVUHVHUYRLUVVSULQJVDQGZHOOV$VZDWHU WUDYHOVRYHUWKHVXUIDFHRIWKHODQGRUWKURXJKWKH

JURXQGLWGLVVROYHVQDWXUDOO\RFFXUULQJPLQHUDOV

DQGLQVRPHFDVHVUDGLRDFWLYHPDWHULDODQGFDQ

SLFNXSVXEVWDQFHVUHVXOWLQJIURPWKHSUHVHQFHRI

DQLPDOVRUIURPKXPDQDFWLYLW\

3

Contaminants that may be present in the source water include:

  1. Microbiological contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
  3. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
  4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
  5. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
  • JAMES E. ANDERSON
    WATER TREATMENT PLANT

PRINEVILLE

WATER TREATMENT PLANT

MIDPORT

WATER STORAGE AND

PUMP STATION

 

*#

*#

 

*#

SOUTHPORT

 

WATER STORAGE AND

RANGELINE

PUMP STATION

WATER STORAGE AND

 

PUMP STATION

 

WESTPORT

WATER STORAGE AND

PUMP STATIONSources: Esri, HERE, Garmin, USGS, Intermap, INCREMENT P, NRCan, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri

Korea, Esri (Thailand), NGCC, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community

CITY OF PORT ST. LUCIE UTILITY SYSTEMS DEPARTMENT

PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM

EAST TO WEST

SOURCE TRACE

Legend

Water Treatment Plant

#* Booster Pump Station

Percent of JEA Water 0 - 20%

  • 20 - 40%
  • 40 - 60%
  • 60 - 80%
  • 80 - 100%

0 3,000 6,000 12,000 18,000 24,000 Feet

1 inch = 8,000 feet

Trace Figure 1

August 2019

4

 

 

Water Quality Report 2020

How safe is our water?

7RHQVXUHWKDWWDSZDWHULVVDIHWRGULQNWKH(3$6RPHSHRSOHPD\EHPRUHYXOQHUDEOHWRFRQWDPLQDQWV

SUHVFULEHVUHJXODWLRQVZKLFKOLPLWWKHDPRXQWRILQGULQNLQJZDWHUWKDQWKHJHQHUDOSRSXODWLRQ

FHUWDLQFRQWDPLQDQWVLQZDWHUSURYLGHGE\SXEOLFZDWHU ,PPXQRFRPSURPLVHGSHUVRQVVXFKDVSHUVRQVZLWK

V\VWHPV7KH)RRGDQG'UXJ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ FDQFHUXQGHUJRLQJFKHPRWKHUDS\SHUVRQVZKRKDYH

UHJXODWLRQVHVWDEOLVKOLPLWVIRUFRQWDPLQDQWVLQERWWOHG XQGHUJRQHRUJDQWUDQVSODQWVSHRSOHZLWK+,9$,'6

ZDWHUZKLFKPXVWSURYLGHWKHVDPHSURWHFWLRQIRURURWKHULPPXQHV\VWHPGLVRUGHUVVRPHHOGHUO\DQG

SXEOLFKHDOWKLQIDQWVFDQEHSDUWLFXODUO\DWULVNIURPLQIHFWLRQV7KHVH

SHRSOHVKRXOGVHHNDGYLFHDERXWGULQNLQJZDWHUIURP

'ULQNLQJZDWHULQFOXGLQJERWWOHGZDWHUPD\UHDVRQDEO\ WKHLUKHDOWKFDUHSURYLGHUV(3$&HQWHUIRU'LVHDVH

EHH[SHFWHGWRFRQWDLQDWOHDVWVPDOODPRXQWVRI&RQWURO &'& JXLGHOLQHVRQDSSURSULDWHPHDQVWR

VRPHFRQWDPLQDQWV7KHSUHVHQFHRIFRQWDPLQDQWVOHVVHQWKHULVNRILQIHFWLRQE\Cryptosporidium and

GRHVQRWQHFHVVDULO\LQGLFDWHWKDWWKHZDWHUSRVHVD RWKHUPLFURELRORJLFDOFRQWDPLQDQWVDUHDYDLODEOHIURP

KHDOWKULVN0RUHLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWFRQWDPLQDQWVDQG WKH6DIH'ULQNLQJ:DWHU+RWOLQHDW

SRWHQWLDOKHDOWKHIIHFWVFDQEHREWDLQHGE\FDOOLQJWKH

(QYLURQPHQWDO3URWHFWLRQ$JHQF\¶V6DIH'ULQNLQJ:DWHU ,QWKH)ORULGD'HSDUWPHQWRI(QYLURQPHQWDO

+RWOLQHDW3URWHFWLRQ )'(3 SHUIRUPHGD6RXUFH:DWHU $VVHVVPHQWRIWKH&LW\¶VZDWHUVXSSO\V\VWHPWRLGHQWLI\

,QDGGLWLRQLISUHVHQWHOHYDWHGOHYHOVRIOHDGFDQDQ\SRWHQWLDOVRXUFHVRIFRQWDPLQDWLRQLQWKHYLFLQLW\RI

FDXVHVHULRXVKHDOWKSUREOHPVHVSHFLDOO\IRUSUHJQDQW RXUZHOOV6HYHQSRWHQWLDOVRXUFHVRIFRQWDPLQDWLRQWKDW

ZRPHQDQG\RXQJFKLOGUHQ/HDGLQGULQNLQJZDWHULV ZHUHLGHQWL¿HGIRUWKLVV\VWHPKDYHDORZVXVFHSWLELOLW\

SULPDULO\IURPPDWHULDOVDQGFRPSRQHQWVDVVRFLDWHG OHYHO,WVKRXOGEHQRWHGWKDWWKHSRWHQWLDOVRXUFHVRI

ZLWKVHUYLFHOLQHVDQGKRPHSOXPELQJ7KH&LW\RI3RUW FRQWDPLQDWLRQLGHQWL¿HGE\WKLVDVVHVVPHQWDUHMXVW

6W/XFLH8WLOLW\6\VWHPV'HSDUWPHQWLVUHVSRQVLEOHIRU WKDWSRWHQWLDOVRXUFHV$OORI3RUW6W/XFLH¶VZDWHU

SURYLGLQJKLJKTXDOLW\GULQNLQJZDWHUEXWFDQQRWFRQWURO VXSSO\IDFLOLWLHVDUHUHJXODWHGDQGRSHUDWHXQGHU

WKHYDULHW\RIPDWHULDOVXVHGLQSOXPELQJFRPSRQHQWV VWULQJHQWFRQVWUXFWLRQDQGPDLQWHQDQFHVWDQGDUGV

:KHQ\RXUZDWHUKDVEHHQVLWWLQJIRUVHYHUDOKRXUV\RX WRSURWHFWERWKKXPDQKHDOWKDQGWKHHQYLURQPHQW

FDQPLQLPL]HWKHSRWHQWLDOIRUOHDGH[SRVXUHE\ÀXVKLQJ 7KHSXUSRVHRI)'(3FRQGXFWLQJWKHVRXUFHZDWHU

\RXUWDSIRUVHFRQGVWRPLQXWHVEHIRUHXVLQJZDWHU DVVHVVPHQWVZDVWRGHWHUPLQHLIDQ\DFWLRQVDUHQHHGHG

IRUGULQNLQJRUFRRNLQJ,I\RXDUHFRQFHUQHGDERXWWRUHGXFHFXUUHQWULVNVWRDYRLGIXWXUHSUREOHPV1R

OHDGLQ\RXUZDWHU\RXPD\ZLVKWRKDYH\RXUZDWHU DFWLRQVZHUHUHFRPPHQGHG7KHDVVHVVPHQWUHVXOWVDUH

WHVWHG,QIRUPDWLRQRQOHDGLQGULQNLQJZDWHUWHVWLQJ DYDLODEOHRQWKH)'(36RXUFH:DWHU$VVHVVPHQWDQG

PHWKRGVDQGVWHSV\RXFDQWDNHWRPLQLPL]HH[SRVXUH 3URWHFWLRQ3URJUDPZHEVLWHDWKWWSVÀGHSGHSVWDWH

LVDYDLODEOHIURPWKH6DIH'ULQNLQJ:DWHU+RWOLQHRUDW ÀXVVZDSS KWWSZZZHSDJRYVDIHZDWHUOHDG

Cross Connection Control:

Protecting our Water

7KHUHDUHRYHUFRQQHFWLRQVWRRXUZDWHUGLVWULEXWLRQV\VWHP:KHQFRQQHFWLRQVDUHSURSHUO\

LQVWDOOHGDQGPDLQWDLQHGWKHULVNVRIFRQWDPLQDWLRQDUHYHU\PLQLPDO+RZHYHUXQDSSURYHGDQGLPSURSHU

SLSLQJFKDQJHVRUFRQQHFWLRQVFDQDGYHUVHO\DIIHFWQRWRQO\WKHDYDLODELOLW\EXWDOVRWKHTXDOLW\RIWKH ZDWHU$FURVVFRQQHFWLRQPD\OHWSROOXWHGZDWHURUHYHQFKHPLFDOVPLQJOHLQWRWKHZDWHUVXSSO\V\VWHP ZKHQQRWSURSHUO\SURWHFWHG7KLVQRWRQO\FRPSURPLVHVWKHZDWHUTXDOLW\LWFDQDOVRDIIHFW\RXUKHDOWK

6RZKDWFDQ\RXGR"'RQRWPDNHRUDOORZLPSURSHUFRQQHFWLRQVDW\RXUKRPH$QXQSURWHFWHGJDUGHQ KRVHO\LQJLQDSXGGOHLVDFURVVFRQQHFWLRQ7KHXQSURWHFWHGODZQVSULQNOHUV\VWHPLVDOVRDFURVV

FRQQHFWLRQ,QDGGLWLRQUHVLGHQWVLQQHLJKERUKRRGVXWLOL]LQJUHFODLPHGZDWHUIRULUULJDWLRQPXVWWDNH

SUHFDXWLRQVWRSUHYHQWFURVVFRQQHFWLRQV5HFODLPHGZDWHULVQRWVXLWDEOHIRUSRWDEOHXVHDQGPXVWQRWEH

FRQQHFWHGWRKRXVHKROGSOXPELQJ:KHQWKHFURVVFRQQHFWLRQLVDOORZHGWRH[LVWDW\RXUKRPHLWZLOODIIHFW

\RXDQG\RXUIDPLO\¿UVW,I\RX¶GOLNHWROHDUQPRUHDERXWKHOSLQJWRSURWHFWWKHTXDOLW\RIGULQNLQJZDWHU

FDOOXVDWIRUIXUWKHULQIRUPDWLRQDERXWZD\V\RXFDQKHOS

Water Quality Report 2020

 

 

5

Water Conservation Tips

&RQVHUYLQJZDWHUQRWRQO\KHOSV\RXVDYHPRQH\EXWLWDOVRKHOSVSUHVHUYHRXUZDWHUUHVRXUFHVIRUWKHXVHRI

JHQHUDWLRQVWRFRPH7KHSRZHUWRFRQVHUYHZDWHUFRQWLQXHVWRUHVWZLWKHDFKRIXV\RXQJDQGROGDOLNHVRSOHDVH

VKDUHWKHIROORZLQJWLSVZLWK\RXUIDPLO\PHPEHUVIULHQGVDQGQHLJKERUV

  • $YRLGXQQHFHVVDU\WRLOHWÀXVKHV'LVSRVHRIWLVVXHVLQVHFWVDQG RWKHUZDVWHLQWKHWUDVK
  • 7DNHDVKRZHULQVWHDGRIDEDWK<RXFRXOGVDYHXSWRJDOORQV
    ZKHQWDNLQJDPLQXWHVKRZHUZLWKDORZÀRZVKRZHUKHDG
  • %HFRPHDOHDNGHWHFWLYH5HJXODUO\FKHFNIDXFHWVWRLOHWVKRVH ELEVDQGVSULQNOHUVIRUOHDNVDQGPDNHQHFHVVDU\UHSDLUV$VORZ GULSFDQZDVWHRUPRUHJDOORQVRIZDWHUSHUGD\
  • 7XUQRIIWKHZDWHUZKLOHVKDYLQJEUXVKLQJ\RXUWHHWKRUZDVKLQJ
    \RXUKDQGV
  • 6RDNGLUW\SRWVDQGSDQVLQVWHDGRIOHWWLQJWKHZDWHUUXQZKLOH
    \RXVFUDSHWKHP
  • *HWWKHPRVWIRU\RXUPRQH\DQGRQO\UXQ\RXUDXWRPDWLFGLVKZDVKHUZKHQLW¶VIXOO'LVKZDVKHUVXVHDERXW
    JDOORQVRIZDWHUGXULQJHYHU\F\FOHUHJDUGOHVVRIKRZPDQ\GLVKHVDQGJODVVHVDUHORDGHGLQWRLW
  • 8VHPXOFKLQSODQWEHGVWRUHWDLQPRLVWXUHUHGXFHHYDSRUDWLRQDQGGLVFRXUDJHZHHGVWKDWFRPSHWHZLWK
    SODQWVIRUZDWHU
  • $OZD\VIROORZWKH:DWHU8VH5HVWULFWLRQVLPSRVHGE\6RXWK)ORULGD:DWHU0DQDJHPHQW'LVWULFWIRUODQGVFDSH LUULJDWLRQGD\VDQGWLPHV

$GGLWLRQDOZDWHUFRQVHUYDWLRQWLSVDQGLQIRUPDWLRQDERXWWKHLPSRUWDQFHRIZDWHUFRQVHUYDWLRQFDQEHIRXQGDWWKH IROORZLQJVLWHVZZZFLW\RISVOFRPKWWSP\VIZPGJRYRUKWWSZZZHSDJRYZDWHUVHQVH

'HÀQLWLRQV

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL):

The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG):

The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Action Level (AL):

The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL):

The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

“ND”

Not Detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.

Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA):

The average of sample analytical results for samples taken at a particular monitoring location during the previous four calendar quarters.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l):

One part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l):

One part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.

Picocurie per liter (pCi/L):

Measure of the radioactivity in water.

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG):

The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do

QRWUHÁHFWWKHEHQHÀWVRIWKHXVHRIGLVLQIHFWDQWVWRFRQWURO microbial contaminants.

6 Water Quality Report 2020

Lead and Copper Results

These results are for the entire distribution system

Contaminant and Unit

Dates of

AL

90th

# of sites

 

AL

Likely Source of

Sampling

Violation

Percentile

Exceeding

MCLG

(action

of Measurement

Contamination

(mo./yr.)

Y/N

Result

the AL

 

level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corrosion of household

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

plumbing

Copper (tap water)

8-9/2020

N

0.11

0

1.3

1.3

systems; erosion of natural

(ppm)

deposits;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

leaching from wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

preservatives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corrosion of household

Lead (tap water) (ppb)

8-9/2020

N

1.9

2

0

15

plumbing

systems; erosion of natural

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

deposits;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products

These results are for the entire distribution system

Contaminant and Unit

Dates of

MCL

Level

Range of

MCLG

MCL or

Likely Source of

Sampling

Violation

or

of Measurement

Detected*

Results

MRDL

Contamination

(mo./yr.)

Y/N

MRDLG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chloramines (ppm)

1-12/2020

N

2.8

2.4 -

MRDLG

MRDL

Water additive used to

3.1

= 4

= 4.0

control microbes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19.0 (highest

 

 

 

 

Haloacetic Acids

2,5,8,11

N

LRAA at site

1.6 -

N/A

MCL

By-product of drinking water

(HAA5) (ppb)

2020

6) @ 2782 SE

19.0

= 60

disinfection

 

 

 

 

 

Ibis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27.8 (highest

 

 

 

 

TTHM (Total trihalo-

2,5,8,11

N

LRAA at site

0.9 -

N/A

MCL

By-product of drinking water

methanes) (ppb)

2020

1)@ 1062 SE

27.8

= 80

disinfection

 

 

 

 

 

Prineville St

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or the highest detected level at any sampling point, depending on the sampling frequency. For THM’s and HAA’s, the “level detected” is the highest locational running annual average for the year.

UCMR4 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products

These results are for the entire distribution system

Contaminant and Unit

Dates of

Level

Range of

Likely Source of

Sampling

of Measurement

Detected (Average)

Results

Contamination

(mo./yr.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAA9

3,9/20

22.5

1.7-40.4

By-product of drinking water disinfection

 

 

 

 

 

HAA6Br

3,9/20

12.3

1.2-21.7

By-product of drinking water disinfection

 

 

 

 

 

HAA5

3,9/20

14.3

1.4-25.7

By-product of drinking water disinfection

 

 

 

 

 

Unregulated Contaminants

For Prinville Water Treatment Plant

Contaminant and Unit

Dates of

Level

Range of

Likely Source of

Sampling

Detected

of Measurement

Results

Contamination

(mo./yr.)

(Average)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source Water (Limeplant)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Organic Carbon

3,9/20

10495

9990-11000

Naturally present in the environment

(ug/L)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bromide (ug/L)

3,9/20

201.5

200-203

Naturally present in the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source Water (RO Plant)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Organic Carbon

3,9/20

1995

1900-2090

Naturally present in the environment

(ug/L)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bromide (ug/L)

4,9/20

4105

4100-4110

Naturally present in the environment

 

 

 

 

 

Water Quality Report 2020

 

 

7

Test Results Table

For Prineville Water Treatment Plant

Contaminant

and Unit

of Measurement

Dates of

Sampling

(mo./yr.)

MCL

Violation

Y/N

Level

Detected*

Range of

Results

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Inorganic Contaminants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erosion of natural deposits; discharge

Fluoride (ppm)

3/20

N

0.67

N/A

4

4

from fertilizers and aluminum factories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

when at the optimum level of 0.7 ppm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sodium (ppm)

3/20

N

105

N/A

N/A

160

Salt water intrusion; leaching from soil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge

Barium (ppm)

3/20

N

0.0043

N/A

2

2

IURPPHWDOUHÀQHULHVHURVLRQRIQDWXUDO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

deposits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from

Nitrate (ppm)

3/20

N

0.032

N/A

10

10

septic tanks, sewage; erosion of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

natural deposits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or
    the highest detected level at any sampling point, depending on the sampling frequency. For THM’s and HAA5’s, the “level detected” is the highest locational running annual average for the year.

Test Results Table

For James E. Anderson Water Treatment Plant

Contaminant and

Unit

of Measurement

Dates of

Sampling

(mo./yr.)

MCL

Violation

Y/N

Level

Detected*

Range of

Results

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Radioactive Contaminants

Alpha emitters

(pCi/L)

3/17

N

2.3

N/A

0

15

Erosion of natural deposits

Inorganic Contaminants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erosion of natural deposits;

Fluoride (ppm)

3/20

N

0.75

N/A

4

4

discharge from fertilizer and

aluminum factories when at the

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

optimum level of 0.7ppm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from

Nitrate (ppm)

3/20

N

0.034

N/A

10

10

septic tanks, sewage; erosion of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

natural deposits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sodium (ppm)

3/20

N

120

91.2 - 120

N/A

160

Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge

Barium (ppm)

3/20

N

0.003

N/A

2

2

IURPPHWDOUHÀQHULHVHURVLRQRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

natural deposits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or
    the highest detected level at any sampling point, depending on the sampling frequency. For THM’s and HAA5’s, the “level detected” is the highest locational running annual average for the year.

Unregulated Contaminants

For JEA Water Treatment Plant

Contaminant and Unit

Dates of

Level

 

Range of

Likely Source of

Sampling

Detected

 

of Measurement

 

Results

Contamination

(mo./yr.)

(Average)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source Water

 

Total Organic Carbon

3,9/20

1635

 

1550-1720

Naturally present in the environment

(ug/L)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bromide (ug/L)

4,9/20

7575

 

7360-7790

Naturally present in the environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mayor

Gregory J. Oravec

Vice Mayor

Shannon Martin, District 3

Councilwoman

Stephanie Morgan, District 1

Councilman

David Pickett, District 2

Councilwoman

Jolien Caraballo, District 4

City of Port St. Lucie Utility Systems Department

City Manager

Brad Macek, Utility Systems Director

Russ Blackburn

Contaminants


St. Lucie West Utilities

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 16795
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Groundwater
  • Total: 7

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Other Detected Contaminants

  • Chlorate
  • Chromium (total)
  • Fluoride
  • Haloacetic acids (HAA5)
  • Selenium
  • Strontium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

Port St. Lucie Tap Water

The Port St. Lucie Water Treatment Plant is located in St. Lucie, Florida, and it treats all of the town’s drinking water. This treatment plant was built in the 1950s, during the age of chlorination, and there are many cases where levels of chlorine have reached dangerous levels. Chlorine is a by-product of the process used to purify seawater, and the excess it produces is stored in the plant’s natural water supply. If you live somewhere with a lousy chlorine level in its tap water, you should get your water treated at this facility. If you don’t have water coming into your home from the plant or serviced by another source, you need to make sure that you are getting your water purifier before you drink it!

The treatment center also removes cysts and other dangerous organisms from the water and heavy metals like lead, which cause a wide range of medical problems in adults and children. If you have any worries about your water’s safety, you should request a sample of it for testing. While there are no safety levels established by the US government when it comes to taping water, you should always take comfort in knowing that testing has proven that it is clean enough to drink.

Even though there are no official national standards for tap water, you will likely still want to test it for its purity. You never know what kinds of contaminants are lurking in your local water supply, and you might be surprised by what you find once you get your water tested. While the levels of toxic substances in your local water may not pose a health threat to you right now, they can increase your risk of disease in the future. Even though testing by a private lab costs a few dollars, it is definitely worth the expense if you want to ensure that your local water is healthy.

Port St. Lucie Drinking Water

You probably have heard that Port St. Lucie is an ideal place for having fun, but did you know that the water quality provided in the area is also top-notch? In fact, the drinking water in the area is ranked among the best available in the country. As a result of constant and rigorous testing, the Port St. Lucie Marine Science Center’s water is considered to be one of the healthiest on the planet. Even better, it is also cost-effective and extremely safe to drink.

When it comes to Port St. Lucie’s drinking water, the quality is outstanding because this is where all of the commercial fishing from the Atlantic Ocean gets filtered through the St. Lucian Islands’ deep well system. The water that makes it into your homes runs through another filtration facility that removes small particles and other unwanted substances from the water as it passes through the town’s storm drains and wastewater treatment plants. Additionally, the drinking water is free of any heavy metals, such as lead and copper. This is the biggest reason why so many people choose to go with this water whenever they want to refresh themselves at home.

When it comes to Port St. Lucie’s drinking water, there is no doubt that it is the best around. With a steady supply of clean and pure water, you can feel confident that you are not putting unhealthy chemicals into your body when you pop open a bottle or fill up a tiny pitcher. Even better, there is no need to worry about buying bottles of water from stores on the island or from truck drivers that take bottled water to remote locations. If you want to stay healthy and feel confident that your family is safe, then you may as well choose Port St. Lucie water to give yourself and your family peace of mind.

Port St. Lucie Drinking Water Quality

Port St. Lucie is an island in the Caribbean about two hundred miles off the coast of Venezuela. When you visit the area, there will be many things for you to do, and there is a good chance that you will want to explore the water. However, if you take a closer look, you may find that the drinking water quality is not what you expected. This is because the water does not meet drinking standards in most areas of the Caribbean.

The drinking water quality is not the only thing that is a problem here. When you go to the town, you also will notice that it is not potable. It is known as an unincorporated territory, but there are no utilities here, and the reason for this is that the region does not have any connection to the mainland. Instead, the water is drawn from a deep underground aquifer about three hundred feet below the surface. The water trickles down from here into the low-lying coastal areas.

Many people believe that the Caribbean islands should be considered part of the United States. For that to happen, there must be a connection between the drinking water quality and the sewer systems that feed those supplies. The problem is that the US does not have an excellent drinking water standard, and the same is true of the ports in St. Lucia. The reason for that is that the US did not commission any studies to establish what kind of water would be safe to drink. Until those studies are done, though, it is best to assume that the US territory’s water is not really safe to drink!

Port St. Lucie Water Treatment

Port St. Lucie Water Treatment Plant is located on Florida’s panhandle, in the vicinity of Miami. The name of the town is pronounced as “Pooky Loo.” It was here that the treatment center for St. Lucie water was established. This one of the seven public treatment centers in Florida offers clean and purified water for every resident.

Port St. Lucie Water Treatment Plant has been serving the people of this town for decades now. In fact, it was here that the first municipal water treatment plant was established here. This means that the water here is 100% safe and clean from any kind of impurities. Well-chlorinated water is obtained at the treatment center with the aid of a chlorinating process. This makes the water healthy and free of any type of contaminants or bacteria.

Every year, an estimated million people visit the treatment center for the St. Lucian water treatment. Though the numbers vary from time to time, the number of people who flock to the center each year is steadily increasing. However, this figure does not include the visitors who simply drop by for a while to pay their last respects to a funeral or offer prayers for a departed soul. Those who merely want to relax amid nature can also visit the center anytime. The atmosphere at the Port St. Lucian water treatment center is serene; hence, there is no need to hurry once one gets here. It is the kind of treatment center where you get to be treated with care and comfort, without having to worry about your health and safety.

Layer 1
Layer 1
Layer 1
×
Layer 1