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Is Miami Gardens Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 7:49 pm, August 5, 2022
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Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Miami Gardens?

Yes, Miami Gardens's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Miami Gardens has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. To find more recent info we might have, you can check out our boil water notice page or the city's water provider website.

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from April 30, 2019 to June 30, 2022, Miami Gardens's water utility, City of Pembroke Pines, had 1 non-health-based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. The last violation for Miami Gardens was resolved on Dec. 31, 2021. This assessment is based on the City of Pembroke Pines water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for Miami Gardens Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in Miami Gardens tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in Miami Gardens's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

Miami Gardens Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named City of Pembroke Pines for Miami Gardens in Florida. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

From Jan. 1, 2021 to Dec. 31, 2021, Miami Gardens had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Regular which falls into the Chemicals rule code group, and the Inorganic Chemicals rule code family for the following contaminant code: Nitrate.

From July 1, 2017 to Sept. 30, 2017, Miami Gardens had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: TTHM.

From April 1, 2017 to June 30, 2017, Miami Gardens had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: TTHM.

From Jan. 1, 2017 to March 31, 2017, Miami Gardens had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: TTHM.

From Oct. 1, 2016 to Dec. 31, 2016, Miami Gardens had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: TTHM.

For the compliance period beginning July 1, 2015, Miami Gardens had 5 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violations with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Groundwater Rule rule code family for the following contaminant codes: E. COLI, E. COLI, E. COLI, E. COLI, E. COLI.

From July 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015, Miami Gardens had 1 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

From July 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015, Miami Gardens had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Routine (RTCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Revised Total Coliform Rule.

For the compliance period beginning May 1, 2015, Miami Gardens had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Groundwater Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: E. COLI.

From Jan. 1, 2015 to Dec. 31, 2015, Miami Gardens had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Regular which falls into the Chemicals rule code group, and the Inorganic Chemicals rule code family for the following contaminant code: Nitrate.

From Sept. 1, 2014 to Sept. 30, 2014, Miami Gardens had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Routine Minor (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

From Aug. 1, 2014 to Aug. 31, 2014, Miami Gardens had 2 health-based Safe Drinking Water Act violations with the violation category being Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant codes: Coliform (TCR), Coliform (TCR).

For the compliance period beginning Dec. 1, 2011, Miami Gardens had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Groundwater Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: E. COLI.

Is there Lead in Miami Gardens Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Miami Gardens water system, City of Pembroke Pines, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.001 mg/L of lead in Miami Gardens water. This is 6.7% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Miami Gardens contained more lead.

While Miami Gardens water testing may have found 0.001 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Miami Gardens Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be at least one military base - Homestead AFB - near Miami Gardens with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Miami Gardens has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

Miami Gardens SDWA Violation History Table - Prior 10 Years

Compliance Period Status Health-Based? Category Code Code Rule Code Contaminant Code Rule Group Code Rule Family Code
01/01/2021 - 12/31/2021 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Regular (03) Nitrates (331) Nitrate (1040) Chemicals (300) Inorganic Chemicals (330)
07/01/2017 - 09/30/2017 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average (02) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2017 - 06/30/2017 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average (02) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2017 - 03/31/2017 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average (02) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
10/01/2016 - 12/31/2016 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Average (02) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) (34) Ground Water Rule (140) E. COLI (3014) Microbials (100) Groundwater Rule (140)
07/01/2015 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) (34) Ground Water Rule (140) E. COLI (3014) Microbials (100) Groundwater Rule (140)
07/01/2015 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) (34) Ground Water Rule (140) E. COLI (3014) Microbials (100) Groundwater Rule (140)
07/01/2015 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) (34) Ground Water Rule (140) E. COLI (3014) Microbials (100) Groundwater Rule (140)
07/01/2015 - 07/31/2015 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) (22) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
07/01/2015 - 07/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring Violation (MON) Monitoring, Routine (RTCR) (3A) Revised Total Coliform Rule (111) Revised Total Coliform Rule (8000) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
07/01/2015 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) (34) Ground Water Rule (140) E. COLI (3014) Microbials (100) Groundwater Rule (140)
05/01/2015 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) (34) Ground Water Rule (140) E. COLI (3014) Microbials (100) Groundwater Rule (140)
01/01/2015 - 12/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Regular (03) Nitrates (331) Nitrate (1040) Chemicals (300) Inorganic Chemicals (330)
09/01/2014 - 09/30/2014 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Routine Minor (TCR) (24) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
08/01/2014 - 08/31/2014 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Monthly (TCR) (22) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
08/01/2014 - 08/31/2014 Resolved Yes Maximum Contaminant Level Violation (MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level Violation, Acute (TCR) (21) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
12/01/2011 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Source Water (GWR) (34) Ground Water Rule (140) E. COLI (3014) Microbials (100) Groundwater Rule (140)

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
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Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
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Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
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Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
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Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
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For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Miami Gardens Water - Frequently Asked Questions

HOW TO READ THE TABLES
You may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations in the water quality analysis table. To help you understand these terms, please see the following definitions. AcƟon Level (AL): The concentration of contaminants which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. LocaƟonal Running Annual Average (LRAA): The average of analytical results for samples taken at a particular monitoring location during the previous four calendar quarters. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as closed to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
HOW DO I CONTACT MIAMI GARDENS CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Miami Gardens water provider, City of Pembroke Pines, please use the information below.
By Phone: 954-518-9040
By Mail: 8300 S. PALM DR.
PEMBROKE PINES, FL, 33025
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR CITY OF PEMBROKE PINES
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their City of Pembroke Pines account to pay their Miami Gardens water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your City of Pembroke Pines bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Miami Gardens water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Miami Gardens water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP MIAMI GARDENS WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Miami Gardens means you will often need to put the water in your name with City of Pembroke Pines. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Miami Gardens means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with City of Pembroke Pines. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Miami Gardens tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 33% Low
  • Water Pollution 49% Moderate
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 67% High
  • Water Quality 51% Moderate

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Miami Gardens, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Miami Gardens Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from Miami Gardens's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

The City of Pembroke Pines is pleased to provide you with this year’s Annual Water Quality Report, based on data com- piled from water quality sampling January 1 through December 31, 2020. We want to keep you informed about the quality water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. The City of Pembroke Pines strives to create a community with

a high quality of life, where citizens can live, work and raise their families safely. As such, we want you to under- stand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources.

We are pleased to report that our drinking water meets all federal and state requirements.

ABOUT LEAD

If present, elevated levels

 

 

 

 

 

 

of lead can cause serious

 

 

 

health problems, especially

 

 

 

for pregnant women and young

 

 

 

children. Lead in drinking water is

 

 

 

primarily from materials and

 

 

 

components associated with service

 

 

 

lines and home plumbing. The City of

WHERE YOUR WATER COMES FROM

 

Pembroke Pines is responsible for provid-

ing high quality drinking water but cannot

control the variety of materials used in plumb-

Our water source is ground water wells drawing from the

ing components. When your water has been

Biscayne Aquifer between 90 and 144 feet, which is then

sitting for several hours, you can minimize the

softened, filtered, and chlorinated for disinfection. Fluoride

potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30

seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or

is added to the water for dental health purposes.

 

 

cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you

 

 

may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in

HOW WE ENSURE YOUR

 

drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize

 

 

or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

 

exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline 800-26-4791

DRINKING WATER IS SAFE

 

 

 

We routinely monitor for contaminants in your drinking

 

 

 

water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regula-

 

 

 

tions. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based

 

 

ANNUAL DRINKING

on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to

 

 

December 31, 2020. Data obtained before January 1, 2020

 

 

WATER QUALITY

and presented in this report are from the most recent testing

 

 

done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.

REPORT PWS ID # 4061083 REPORT

2020

 

As authorized and approved by the U.S. Environmental

 

Protection Agency, the State of Florida has reduced monitor-

 

ing requirements for certain contaminants to less often than

 

 

 

once per year because the concentrations of these contami-

Este reporte contiene

 

nants are not expected to vary significantly. As a result, some

 

of our data is more than one year old.

información muy importante

 

 

sobre su agua potable.

 

HOW TO REACH US

Tradúzcalo o hable con un

 

amigo que lo entienda bien.

 

If you have any questions about this report or about your water

Usted también puede

 

utility, please contact us at 954-518-9000. We encourage our

encontrar este artículo en

 

valued customers to be informed about their water utility. The

español www.ppines.com

 

Pembroke Pines City Commission meets at 7 p.m. every first and

o llame 954-518-9000.

 

third Wednesday of the month (except for July).

 

 

 

 

 

ANNUAL DRINKING

SOURCE WATER

 

ASSESSMENT PLAN

 

WATER QUALITY

 

In 2020, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection

REPORT PWS ID # 4061083 REPORT

with low to high concern. The assessment results are available on

2020

 

 

(FDEP) performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and

 

 

a search of the data source indicated 10 sources of contamination

 

 

 

the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program

 

 

 

website at https://fldep.dep.state.fl.us/swapp/.

For Customers with Special Health Concerns

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than

 

the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons

ADDITIONAL

with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have under-

 

gone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune

HEALTH INFORMATION

system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particular-

ly at risk from infections. These people should seek

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes,

advice about drinking water from their health care

streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land

providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate

or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive

means to lessen the risk of infection by

 

 

material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Cryptosporidium and other microbiological

 

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

contaminants are available from the Safe

 

 

(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment

Drinking Water Hotline 800-426-4791.

 

 

plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

 

 

  1. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or

farming.

(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

  1. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff,

and septic systems.

  1. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
    In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which
    must provide the same protection for public health.
    Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least

small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessar- ily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants

and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinkingn Water Hotlineo at 800-426-4791.

How to Read the Tables

You may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations in the water quality analysis table. To help you understand these terms, please see the following definitions. AcƟon Level (AL): The concentration of contaminants which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

LocaƟonal Running Annual Average (LRAA): The average of analytical results for samples taken at a particular monitoring location during the previous four calendar quarters.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as closed to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfec- tant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. ND: Means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis

RAA: Means running annual average.

N/A: Means not applicable.

pCi/L: Picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

ppm: Parts per million or milligrams per liter (mg/L) is one part by weight of analyte to one million parts by weight of the water sample.

ppb: Parts per billion or micrograms per liter (μg/L) is one part by weight of analyte to one billion parts by weight of the water sample.

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

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