Layer 1

Is Joliet Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 7:48 pm, August 12, 2022
+

Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Joliet?

Yes, Joliet's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Joliet has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. To find more recent info we might have, you can check out our boil water notice page or the city's water provider website.

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from April 30, 2019 to June 30, 2022, Joliet's water utility, Joliet, had 0 violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. The last violation for Joliet was resolved on Dec. 31, 2017. This assessment is based on the Joliet water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for Joliet Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in Joliet tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in Joliet's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

Joliet Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named Joliet for Joliet in Illinois. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

For the compliance period beginning Oct. 1, 2017, Joliet had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Follow-up Or Routine LCR Tap M/R which falls into the Chemicals rule code group, and the Lead and Copper Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: Lead and Copper Rule.

From Oct. 1, 2017 to Dec. 31, 2017, Joliet had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Regular which falls into the Chemicals rule code group, and the Radionuclides rule code family for the following contaminant code: Combined Radium (-226 and -228).

From Jan. 1, 2017 to Dec. 31, 2017, Joliet had 2 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violations with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Regular which falls into the Chemicals rule code group, and the Inorganic Chemicals rule code family for the following contaminant codes: Nitrate, Nitrate.

Is there Lead in Joliet Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Joliet water system, Joliet, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.00723 mg/L of lead in Joliet water. This is 48.2% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Joliet contained more lead.

While Joliet water testing may have found 0.00723 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Joliet Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be at least one military base - Joliet Army Ammunition Plant - near Joliet with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Joliet has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

Joliet SDWA Violation History Table - Prior 10 Years

Compliance Period Status Health-Based? Category Code Code Rule Code Contaminant Code Rule Group Code Rule Family Code
10/01/2017 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Follow-up Or Routine LCR Tap M/R (52) Lead and Copper Rule (350) Lead and Copper Rule (5000) Chemicals (300) Lead and Copper Rule (350)
10/01/2017 - 12/31/2017 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Regular (03) Radionuclides (340) Combined Radium (-226 and -228) (4010) Chemicals (300) Radionuclides (340)
01/01/2017 - 12/31/2017 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Regular (03) Nitrates (331) Nitrate (1040) Chemicals (300) Inorganic Chemicals (330)
01/01/2017 - 12/31/2017 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Regular (03) Nitrates (331) Nitrate (1040) Chemicals (300) Inorganic Chemicals (330)

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
show details
Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
show details
Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
show details
Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
show details
Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
show details

For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Joliet Water - Frequently Asked Questions

WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION OR PROVIDE COMMENTS?
For general questions: Department of Public Utilities 150 W. Jefferson Street Joliet, IL 60432 Phone: (815) 724-4230 Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM For maintenance questions or to report water emergencies: Department of Public Utilities Phone: (815) 724-4220 Hours: 24 Hours For billing questions: Customer Service 150 W. Jefferson Street Joliet, IL 60432 Phone: (815) 724-3820 Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline: Phone: (800) 426-4791 www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water
WHERE DOES YOUR WATER COME FROM?
The City of Joliet draws its groundwater supply from twenty-one deep (bedrock) wells (pumping from 1,000 feet below the surface) and five shallow (gravel) wells (pumping from 80 feet below the surface) located throughout the City. The source water naturally contains radium, iron, manganese, fluoride, and other minerals. The City of Joliet has invested in the construction of eleven water treatment plants to remove the naturally occurring radium from the water supply. All water delivered in 2020 met the federal and state guidelines for safe drinking water. The water is treated using a Hydrous Manganese Oxide (HMO) Treatment process. HMO chemical is added to the water which binds with the radium like a magnet. Then, the treatment equipment removes the combined HMO chemical and radium. This process removes up to 90% of the radium as well as iron and manganese, which contribute to other water quality issues. Your Home Before the water is sent to the distribution system it is treated with a blended ortho- polyphosphate for corrosion control. This reduces rusty water in the distribution system and provides a barrier between the water and metal pipes in your home or business. Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is also added for disinfection of the water. Disinfection chemicals are required by the EPA, and sodium hypochlorite, while more expensive, represents the safest disinfection method for City workers and all water customers. The treated water is then pumped to the distribution system and ultimately to your taps. For more information about the water treatment process or to schedule a group tour of the water supply or wastewater treatment facilities, please contact the Plant Operations Superintendent at (815) 724-3675. Smart Message Community Alert Network: By enrolling you can receive outage notifications from the Department of Public Utilities in the event of an emergency which requires water to be turned off, along with emergency information from the Joliet Police and Fire Departments regarding pending threats to public safety. The Smart Message Network will send out a text message or e-mail notification. Visit www.Joliet.gov/i-want-to/stay-informed to sign up.
WHAT IS LEAD AND HOW ARE WE EXPOSED TO IT?
Lead is a common, naturally occurring metal found throughout the environment. Lead seldom occurs naturally in water supplies like rivers, lakes, and groundwater aquifers. Therefore, lead is rarely present in water coming from a treatment plant. Lead enters drinking water primarily as a result of corrosion or wearing away of materials in the water distribution system and household plumbing that contain lead. Despite concerns about drinking water, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency notes that “the greatest exposure to lead is swallowing or breathing in lead paint chips or dust.” There are three main sources that allow lead to leach into drinking water: lead service lines, lead solder, and water faucets made from brass alloys containing lead. In the early 1900s lead was the preferred material for service lines since it is very flexible and durable. In the 1930s Joliet, along with many other communities around the country, banned the use of lead for service lines. At that time, Joliet began to require copper water service lines for all new construction. Before 1986, the solder used to join copper pipes together most likely contained lead. Lead alloy solder was used because it has a lower melting point and flows better to join the pipes. Before 2014, brass water fixtures were commonly made with brass alloys containing as much as 2% lead. While this does not seem to be a lot, when machined, the lead molecules will smear on the finished surface, increasing the contact surface with water. A house with a water softener is more likely to absorb contaminants if present in the home’s plumbing. The City of Joliet is completing an inventory of water service line materials. An interactive water service line material map is available on the City’s website at www.Joliet.gov/GetTheLeadOut. Please use this map to find out, when available, the material of the water service at your house. The City is also offering a cost share program to residents with confirmed lead water service lines. The City will replace the public portion of the water service (b-box to water main) at no cost if the homeowner replaces the private portion (b-box to meter). Approximate costs to the homeowner are $2500-$5000. Payment plans with the City for this work will be available with negotiable terms. To discuss participating in this program, please contact the Department of Public Utilities at 815- 724-4220. In addition to the cost-sharing program, the City of Joliet is also utilizing the IEPA Low Interest Loan Program with principal forgiveness to complete projects in parts of the City where there are concentrated locations of known lead service lines. Please visit the City’s website to learn more about this program and the areas where lead water service line replacement is targeted over the next four years. This program, which replaces lead water service lines at no cost to the homeowner, will continue as long as funding is available.
WHERE IN MY HOUSE DO I HAVE LEAD?
There are three main sources that allow lead to leach into drinking water: lead service lines, lead solder, and water faucets made from brass alloys containing lead. In the early 1900s lead was the preferred material for service lines since it is very flexible and durable. In the 1930s Joliet, along with many other communities around the country, banned the use of lead for service lines. At that time, Joliet began to require copper water service lines for all new construction. Before 1986, the solder used to join copper pipes together most likely contained lead. Lead alloy solder was used because it has a lower melting point and flows better to join the pipes. Before 2014, brass water fixtures were commonly made with brass alloys containing as much as 2% lead. While this does not seem to be a lot, when machined, the lead molecules will smear on the finished surface, increasing the contact surface with water. A house with a water softener is more likely to absorb contaminants if present in the home’s plumbing. The City of Joliet is completing an inventory of water service line materials. An interactive water service line material map is available on the City’s website at www.Joliet.gov/GetTheLeadOut. Please use this map to find out, when available, the material of the water service at your house. The City is also offering a cost share program to residents with confirmed lead water service lines. The City will replace the public portion of the water service (b-box to water main) at no cost if the homeowner replaces the private portion (b-box to meter). Approximate costs to the homeowner are $2500-$5000. Payment plans with the City for this work will be available with negotiable terms. To discuss participating in this program, please contact the Department of Public Utilities at 815- 724-4220. In addition to the cost-sharing program, the City of Joliet is also utilizing the IEPA Low Interest Loan Program with principal forgiveness to complete projects in parts of the City where there are concentrated locations of known lead service lines. Please visit the City’s website to learn more about this program and the areas where lead water service line replacement is targeted over the next four years. This program, which replaces lead water service lines at no cost to the homeowner, will continue as long as funding is available.
WHAT IS JOLIET DOING?
The City of Joliet is completing an inventory of water service line materials. An interactive water service line material map is available on the City’s website at www.Joliet.gov/GetTheLeadOut. Please use this map to find out, when available, the material of the water service at your house. The City is also offering a cost share program to residents with confirmed lead water service lines. The City will replace the public portion of the water service (b-box to water main) at no cost if the homeowner replaces the private portion (b-box to meter). Approximate costs to the homeowner are $2500-$5000. Payment plans with the City for this work will be available with negotiable terms. To discuss participating in this program, please contact the Department of Public Utilities at 815- 724-4220. In addition to the cost-sharing program, the City of Joliet is also utilizing the IEPA Low Interest Loan Program with principal forgiveness to complete projects in parts of the City where there are concentrated locations of known lead service lines. Please visit the City’s website to learn more about this program and the areas where lead water service line replacement is targeted over the next four years. This program, which replaces lead water service lines at no cost to the homeowner, will continue as long as funding is available.
WHAT SHOULD I DO?
We encourage families with lead service lines or lead in their home plumbing to take precautions to assure they are not exposed to lead at the tap. Testing at the tap is the only way to measure the lead levels in your home or workplace. Families can take steps to reduce their risk by: can sit on the counter, attach to the faucet, or be installed under the sink. All water treatment devices need regular care to work the right way. Not all water treatment devices are the same. Be sure to use a water treatment device made to reduce lead. For more information, visit our website at www.Joliet.gov/GetTheLeadOut or call us at 815-724-4220. For information on reducing lead exposure around your home or building and the health effects of lead, visit the EPA’s Website at www.epa.gov/lead or contact the Will County Health Department Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at 815-727-8830.
WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION?
For more information, visit our website at www.Joliet.gov/GetTheLeadOut or call us at 815-724-4220. For information on reducing lead exposure around your home or building and the health effects of lead, visit the EPA’s Website at www.epa.gov/lead or contact the Will County Health Department Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at 815-727-8830.
WHAT ALTERNATIVE WATER SOURCES WERE EXAMINED?
Initially, fourteen alternative water sources were evaluated during Phase I of the study. During Phase II, five sources were studied in more detail to replace the existing water source in Joliet. This included Lake Michigan - DuPage Water Commission, Lake Michigan - City of Chicago, Lake Michigan - New Indiana Intake, the Kankakee River, and the Illinois River. In January 2020, the Joliet City Council selected Lake Michigan water and directed staff to simultaneously evaluate the New Indiana Intake and City of Chicago alternatives as part of the 2020 Evaluation. In January 2021, the City Council approved the selection of purchasing finished water from the City of Chicago.
HOW WILL THIS AFFECT MY WATER BILL?
The current average monthly water bill in 2021 is $34.00. In 2030, with Lake Michigan water purchased from the City of Chicago, it is estimated the average water bill will increase by an additional $44-$54 per month. These bill increases are being further studied and refined as the program progresses. The new treated Lake Michigan Water supply will have a more aesthetically pleasing water quality, with lower hardness and less potential for scaling of water fixtures. For water customers that have home water softeners, these will no longer be necessary. The City has a rain barrel subsidy and low flow toilet rebate program to help residents conserve water. Please visit www.RethinkWaterJoliet.org and click on the Conservation tab for more information.
WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF LAKE MICHIGAN WATER VERSUS JOLIET’S EXISTING WELL WATER SUPPLY?
The new treated Lake Michigan Water supply will have a more aesthetically pleasing water quality, with lower hardness and less potential for scaling of water fixtures. For water customers that have home water softeners, these will no longer be necessary. The City has a rain barrel subsidy and low flow toilet rebate program to help residents conserve water. Please visit www.RethinkWaterJoliet.org and click on the Conservation tab for more information.
WHAT ARE SOME WAYS I CAN CONSERVE WATER?
The City has a rain barrel subsidy and low flow toilet rebate program to help residents conserve water. Please visit www.RethinkWaterJoliet.org and click on the Conservation tab for more information.
WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION?
Join our mailing list by providing your email address in the upper right corner of the website homepage and subscribe to keep up to date. The following water restrictions are in place for the City of Joliet water customers year-round per City of Joliet Code of Ordinances, Sec. 31-126: Lawn watering may only occur between 6:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. at even numbered addresses on even numbered days and at odd numbered addresses on odd numbered days.
HOW DO I CONTACT JOLIET CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Joliet water provider, Joliet, please use the information below.
By Mail: 150 W. Jefferson Street
JOLIET, IL, 60432
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR JOLIET
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their Joliet account to pay their Joliet water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your Joliet bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Joliet water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Joliet water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP JOLIET WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Joliet means you will often need to put the water in your name with Joliet. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Joliet means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with Joliet. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

Is Joliet Tap Water Safe to Drink? Tap water & safety quality

The estimated price of bottled water

$2 in USD (1.5-liter)

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Joliet tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 30% Low
  • Water Pollution 51% Moderate
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 70% High
  • Water Quality 49% Moderate

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Joliet, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Joliet Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from Joliet's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

June 2021

Joliet, IL

Dear City of Joliet

Water Customers,

This Consumer Confidence Report is required by the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and is intended to inform all water customers about the quality of the drinking water provided to them. Tap water was tested according to all drinking water regulatory standards.

Providing a quality drinking water supply is the critical mission of the Department of Public Utilities. Please spend some time reading this report to learn more about our water, where it comes from, and what the City does to provide a safe source of drinking water to our customers.

Additional information about our water is provided on our website at www. Joliet.gov/Water. Your comments on this report are welcomed to help us improve our communications regarding the City’s water system in future years. The City of Joliet Department of Public Utilities can be contacted at 815-724-4230.

Sincerely,

Allison M.W. Swisher, P.E.

Director of Public Utilities

City of Joliet

Where can I get more information or provide comments?

For general questions: Department of Public Utilities 150 W. Jefferson Street Joliet, IL 60432

Phone: (815) 724-4230

Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

For maintenance questions or to report water emergencies:

Department of Public Utilities Phone: (815) 724-4220 Hours: 24 Hours

For billing questions: Customer Service

150 W. Jefferson Street

Joliet, IL 60432

Phone: (815) 724-3820

Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline:

Phone: (800) 426-4791

www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water

2020 JOLIET DRINKING WATER Q U A L I T Y R E P O R T

Este informe contiene información muy importante. Tradúscalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

WHERE DOES YOUR WATER COME FROM?

The City of Joliet draws its groundwater supply from twenty-one deep (bedrock) wells (pumping from 1,000 feet below the surface) and five shallow (gravel) wells (pumping from 80 feet below the surface) located throughout the City. The source water naturally contains radium, iron, manganese, fluoride, and other minerals. The City of Joliet has invested in the construction of eleven water treatment plants to remove the naturally occurring radium from the water supply. All water delivered in 2020 met the federal and state guidelines for safe drinking water.

The water is treated using a Hydrous Manganese Oxide (HMO) Treatment process. HMO chemical is added to the water which binds with the radium like a magnet. Then, the treatment equipment removes the combined HMO chemical and radium. This process removes up to 90% of the radium as well as iron and manganese, which contribute to other water quality issues.

WATER SYSTEM DIAGRAM

Water Filtration

Elevated Water

Treatment Plant

Storage &

 

Distribution

900-1000 ft.

Low Pressure

Pump Setting

Storage

 

Your Home

1600-1800 ft.

High Pressure

Deep Well

Service Pumps

Before the water is sent to the distribution system it is treated with a blended ortho- polyphosphate for corrosion control. This reduces rusty water in the distribution system and provides a barrier between the water and metal pipes in your home or business. Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is also added for disinfection of the water. Disinfection chemicals are required by the EPA, and sodium hypochlorite, while more expensive, represents the safest disinfection method for City workers and all water customers.

The treated water is then pumped to the distribution system and ultimately to your taps. For more information about the water treatment process or to schedule a group tour of the water supply or wastewater treatment facilities, please contact the Plant Operations Superintendent at (815) 724-3675.

Smart Message Community Alert Network:

By enrolling you can receive outage notifications from the Department of Public Utilities in the event of an emergency which requires water to be turned off, along with emergency information

from the Joliet Police and Fire Departments regarding pending threats to public safety. The Smart Message Network will send out a text message or e-mail notification. Visit www.Joliet.gov/i-want-to/stay-informed to sign up.

WATER QUALITY

In order to ensure tap water is safe to drink, the USEPA prescribes regulations that limits the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water supply systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, people who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV / AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. USEPA / CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or human activity. Because of this, some level of treatment is required for all water.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants: such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife;
  • Inorganic contaminants: such as salts and metals, which may be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming;
  • Pesticides and herbicides: which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses;
  • Organic chemical contaminants: including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems;
  • Radioactive contaminants: which may be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

SYSTEM MANAGEMENT

The Joliet public water supply is owned by the City of Joliet. The City of Joliet Mayor and City Council establish the policies that control the operations of the water supply. The public is welcome to attend regular City Council meetings on the first and third Tuesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers at the Joliet Municipal Building, 150 West Jefferson Street, Joliet, Illinois. If you would like to address the City Council at a meeting, please contact the City Clerk at (815) 724-3780.

SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT

The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) has established the criteria for determining the vulnerability of source water to potential sources of contamination. To determine Joliet’s susceptibility to groundwater contamination, a Well Site Survey and a Source Inventory, performed by Illinois Rural Water Association, inside the recharge areas were conducted. During the survey of Joliet’s source water protection area, Illinois EPA and Illinois Rural Water Association staff recorded potential sources, routes or possible problem sites within the minimum setback zones of 200 or 400 feet and within the 1,000 foot maximum setback zones around the wells. The tool used to apply these criteria is the source water assessment. The source water assessment for our water supply was prepared by the Illinois EPA. The City of Joliet’s source water assessment is as follows:

“The Illinois EPA considers the gravel wells of this facility to be susceptible to Synthetic Organic Contaminant (SOC) contamination and does not consider the bedrock wells to be susceptible to Inorganic Contaminant (IOC), Synthetic Organic Contaminant (SOC) or Volatile Organic Contaminant (VOC) contamination. This determination is based on a number of criteria including: monitoring conducted at the wells, monitoring conducted at the entry point to the distribution system, the available hydrogeologic data on the wells, and the land-use activities in the recharge area of the wells.” The Illinois Environmental Protection Act established minimum protection zones for Joliet’s active community water supply wells. The twenty-one bedrock wells have minimum setback zones of 200 feet and the five gravel wells have minimum setback zones of 400 feet. These minimum protection zones are regulated by the Illinois EPA. In addition to the minimum setback zones, five-year recharge areas have been delineated for the five gravel wells. To request additional information on our community’s water supply source water assessment, please contact the Department of Public Utilities at (815) 724-4220 or via our website at www.Joliet.gov/Water.

2020 JOLIET DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

N/A

 

not applicable

mg/L

 

milligrams per liter or parts per million -

pCi/L

picocuries per liter, used to measure

 

 

 

 

 

 

or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water

 

radioactivity

µg/l

 

micrograms per liter or parts

ppb

 

micrograms per liter or parts per billion

ppm

milligrams per liter or parts per

 

 

per billion - or one ounce in

 

 

- or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of

 

million - or one ounce in 7,350

 

 

7,350,000 gallons of water

 

 

water

 

gallons of water

 

 

 

 

AL

Action Level, or the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements

 

 

 

which a water system must follow.

 

 

 

MCL

Maximum Contaminant Level, or the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as

 

 

 

close to the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

 

 

MCLG

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal, or the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or

 

 

 

expected risk to health. MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety.

 

 

 

 

MRDL

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level, or the highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is

 

 

 

convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

 

 

MRDLG

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal, or the level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no

 

 

 

known or expected risk to health. MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use

of disinfectants to control microbial

 

 

 

contaminants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HMO

Hydrous Manganese Oxide, or the treatment chemical used for the removal of radium from drinking water.

 

 

EPA

Environmental Protection Agency, or the regulatory agency which establishes standards for drinking water at the

 

 

 

Federal level (USEPA) or at the State level (IEPA).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LEAD AND COPPER

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, metals from pipes and brass faucets will leach into the water. You can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791 or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

LEAD

 

 

ACTION

 

 

 

 

 

AND

DATE

 

LEVEL

90TH

NO. SITES

 

 

 

COPPER

SAMPLED

MCLG

(AL)

PERCENTILE

OVER AL

Units

VIOLATION

LIKELY SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION

Lead

2018

0

15

8.18

3

ppb

No

Corrosion of household plumbing systems:

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood

Copper

2018

1.3

1.3

0.553

0

ppm

No

preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

systems

DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

Disinfection of drinking water is one of the major public health advances in the 20th century. One hundred years ago, typhoid and cholera epidemics were common throughout American cities and disinfection was a major factor in reducing these epidemics. However, the disinfectants themselves can react with naturally occurring materials in the water to form unintended by-products that may pose health risks.

 

 

HIGHEST

RANGE OF

 

 

 

 

 

 

COLLECTION

LEVEL

LEVELS

 

 

 

 

LIKELY SOURCE OF

DISINFECTANTS

DATE

DETECTED

DETECTED

MRDLG

MRDL

UNITS

VIOLATION

CONTAMINATION

Chloramines

2020

2

2 - 2

4

4

ppm

No

Water additive used to

control microbes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coliform Bacteria

Coliform Bacteria

Highest No.

of Positive

0.8

MCLG

0

Total Coliform

Maximum

Contaminant Level

5% of monthly

samples are

positive

Fecal Coliform or E.Coli Maximum Contaminant Level

n/a

Total No. of Positivie

E. Coli or Fecal

Coliform Samples

0

Violation

No

LIKELY SOURCE OF

CONTAMINATION

Naturally present in the

environment

2020 JOLIET DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

INORGANIC CHEMICALS (IOCs)

Inorganic chemicals (IOCs) include salts, metals, minerals, and nutrients that can be naturally occurring or which can result from storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, or farm activities. Because our source of drinking water is groundwater, a significant amount of naturally occurring minerals are dissolved in the water. These dissolved minerals can account for the “hardness” of the water.

 

 

HIGHEST

RANGE OF

 

 

 

 

 

INORGANIC

COLLECTION

LEVEL

LEVELS

 

 

 

 

LIKELY SOURCE OF

CONTAMINANTS

DATE

DETECTED

DETECTED

MCLG

MCL

UNITS

VIOLATION

CONTAMINATION

 

 

 

0.0141 -

 

 

 

 

Discharge of drilling wastes;

Barium

2020

0.035

2

2

ppm

No

Discharge from metal refineries;

0.035

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erosion of natural deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erosion of natural deposits; Water

Fluoride

2020

1.14

1.04 - 1.14

4

4.0

ppm

No

additive which promotes strong

teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

aluminum factories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erosion from naturally occuring

Sodium

2020

95.5

39.3 - 95.5

n/a

n/a

ppm

No

deposits. Used in water softener

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

regeneration

RADIONUCLIDES

Radionuclides are man-made or natural elements that emit radiation. A picocurie per liter is a unit of radioactivity. A curie is the amount of radioactivity in a gram of radium. A picocurie is one trillionth of a curie.

 

 

HIGHEST

RANGE OF

 

 

 

 

 

RADIOACTIVE

COLLECTION

LEVEL

LEVELS

 

 

 

 

LIKELY SOURCE OF

CONTAMINANTS

DATE

DETECTED

DETECTED

MCLG

MCL

UNITS

VIOLATION

CONTAMINATION

Gross alpha excluding

2020

11

0.22 - 11.1

0

15

pCi/L

No

Erosion of natural

radon & uranium

deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Combined radium

2020

3

0.24 - 3.4

0

5

pCi/L

No

Erosion of natural

226/228

deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uranium

2020

0.33

0.3 - 0.33

0

30

ug/l

No

Erosion of natural

deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction Zone

2021 Water Main Replacement Projects and 2022 Look Ahead

This year is Year 5 of the City’s Water Main Replacement Program with a goal of replacing 1% of the City’s water mains on an annual basis. In 2021, six construction contracts have been awarded to replace approximately 30,800 LF of water main. Also scheduled for this year is the Houbolt Avenue (Mound to Rt. 6) water main extension which will be constructed as part of the Houbolt Avenue Road project.

Looking ahead to 2022 we will be increasing water main replacement to 3% annually. This is part of our non-revenue water reduction strategy as required by IDNR as part of our Lake Michigan Allocation. Between 2022 and 2030 we will be replacing all water mains constructed prior to the 1970s. This will be a lot of work but by the time the next decade rolls around our system will be in great condition.

To keep up to date with current projects under construction visit our website at

Joliet.gov/departments/construction-zone

2020 JOLIET DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

What is lead and how are we exposed to it?

Lead is a common, naturally occurring metal found throughout the environment. Lead seldom occurs naturally in water supplies like rivers, lakes, and groundwater aquifers. Therefore, lead is rarely present in water coming from a treatment plant. Lead enters drinking water primarily as a result of corrosion or wearing away of materials in the water distribution system and household plumbing that contain lead. Despite concerns about drinking water, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency notes that “the greatest exposure to lead is swallowing or breathing in lead paint chips or dust.”

Where in my house do I have lead?

There are three main sources that allow lead to leach into drinking water: lead service lines, lead solder, and water faucets made from brass alloys containing lead. In the early 1900s lead was the preferred material for service lines since it is very flexible and durable. In the 1930s Joliet, along with many other communities around the country, banned the use of lead for service lines. At that time, Joliet began to require copper water service lines for all new construction. Before 1986, the solder used to join copper pipes together most likely contained lead. Lead alloy solder was used because it has a lower melting point and flows better to join the pipes. Before 2014, brass water fixtures were commonly made with brass alloys containing as much as 2% lead. While this does not seem to be a lot, when machined, the lead molecules will smear on the finished surface, increasing the contact surface with water. A house with a water softener is more likely to absorb contaminants if present in the home’s plumbing.

What is Joliet doing?

The City of Joliet is completing an inventory of water service line materials. An interactive water service line material map is available on the City’s website at www.Joliet.gov/GetTheLeadOut. Please use this map to find out, when available, the material of the water service at your house. The City is also offering a cost share program to residents with confirmed lead water service lines. The City will replace the public portion of the water service (b-box to water main) at no cost if the homeowner replaces the private portion (b-box to meter). Approximate costs to the homeowner are $2500-$5000. Payment plans with the City for this work will be available with negotiable terms. To discuss participating in this program, please contact the Department of Public Utilities at 815- 724-4220. In addition to the cost-sharing program, the City of Joliet is also utilizing the IEPA Low Interest Loan Program with principal forgiveness to complete projects in parts of the City where there are concentrated locations of known lead service lines. Please visit the City’s website to learn more about this program and the areas where lead water service line replacement is targeted over the next four years. This program, which replaces lead water service lines at no cost to the homeowner, will continue as long as funding is available.

Typical Copper Line

Typical lead line

What should I do?

We encourage families with lead service lines or lead in their home plumbing to take precautions to assure they are not exposed to lead at the tap. Testing at the tap is the only way to measure the lead levels in your home or workplace.

  • Testing for lead can help you know if there is too much lead in your drinking water. Water testing is important because you cannot see, taste, or smell lead. The City of Joliet offers water testing for lead at no cost to homeowners. For more information on water testing, please call 815-724-3675.

Families can take steps to reduce their risk by:

  • Let it Run — Let your water run for at least 3-5 minutes before using it for drinking or cooking. Do this anytime the water has not been turned on for more than six hours. If you have a lead service line, you may need to let the water run longer.
  • Use Cold Water — When drinking, cooking, or making baby formula use cold tap water. Never use hot water for preparing baby food. Hot water releases more lead from pipes than cold water. Boiling water does NOT remove lead from water.
  • Replace Plumbing Fixtures — If a test shows your water has high levels of lead after you let the water run, you may want to take extra precautions.
  • Treat Your Water — Contact the City to discuss a home treatment tool. Point-of-use (POU) water treatment tools are designed to treat small amounts of drinking water. They

can sit on the counter, attach to the faucet, or be installed under the sink. All water treatment devices need regular care to work the right way. Not all water treatment devices are the same. Be sure to use a water treatment device made to reduce lead.

Where can I get more information?

For more information, visit our website at www.Joliet.gov/GetTheLeadOut

or call us at 815-724-4220.

For information on reducing lead exposure around your home or building and the health effects of lead, visit the EPA’s Website at www.epa.gov/lead or contact the Will County Health Department Lead Poisoning Prevention Program at 815-727-8830.

2020 JOLIET DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

Alternative Water Source Program

Why do we need to find another source of water?

The City currently obtains its water from the Ironton Galesville aquifer. This is a deep aquifer located 1000 feet beneath the ground. We have known since the 1960s that the water being taken out of this aquifer is greater than the amount being recharged. However, it wasn’t until recently that we knew the timeframe that depletion of the aquifer would impact our water supply. Modeling completed in the Fall of 2018 and updated in Spring 2020 indicated the aquifer will not meet the City’s maximum day demands by 2030. Therefore, the City conducted an alternative water source study that was completed in Fall 2020.

What alternative water sources were examined?

Initially, fourteen alternative water sources were evaluated during Phase I of the study. During Phase II, five sources were studied in more detail to replace the existing water source in Joliet. This included Lake Michigan - DuPage Water Commission, Lake Michigan - City of Chicago, Lake Michigan - New Indiana Intake, the Kankakee River, and the Illinois River. In January 2020, the Joliet City Council selected Lake Michigan water and directed staff to simultaneously evaluate the New Indiana Intake and City of Chicago alternatives as part of the 2020 Evaluation. In January 2021, the City Council approved the selection of purchasing finished water from the City of Chicago.

When will construction begin?

Construction of improvements will be completed in phases. The initial phases of construction are anticipated to begin in 2024 at the Southwest Pumping Station site in Chicago.

How will this affect my water bill?

The current average monthly water bill in 2021 is $34.00. In 2030, with Lake Michigan water purchased from the City of Chicago, it is estimated the average water bill will increase by an additional $44-$54 per month. These bill increases are being further studied and refined as the program progresses.

What are the benefits of Lake Michigan water versus Joliet’s existing well water supply?

The new treated Lake Michigan Water supply will have a more aesthetically pleasing water quality, with lower hardness and less potential for scaling of water fixtures. For water customers that have home water softeners, these will no longer be necessary.

What are some ways I can conserve water?

The City has a rain barrel subsidy and low flow toilet rebate program to help residents conserve water. Please visit www.RethinkWaterJoliet.org and click on the Conservation tab for more information.

Where can I get more information?

www.RethinkWaterJoliet.org

Join our mailing list by providing your email address in the upper right corner of the website homepage and subscribe to keep up to date.

The following water restrictions are in place for the City of Joliet water customers

year-round per City of Joliet Code of Ordinances, Sec. 31-126:

Lawn watering may only occur between 6:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. or 6:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. at even numbered addresses

on even numbered days and at odd numbered addresses on odd numbered days.

2020 JOLIET DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

Contaminants


Joliet

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 145000
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Groundwater
  • Total: 8

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Radium%2C combined (-226 & -228)

Other Detected Contaminants

  • 1%2C4-Dioxane
  • Barium
  • Chlorate
  • Fluoride
  • Manganese
  • Molybdenum
  • Strontium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

Joliet Tap Water

Have you ever wondered why some people can drink bottled water while others cannot afford to do so? The simple reason for this seemingly odd condition is how tap water is treated before being sold to consumers. Every time that a company gets a customer’s order, they must test the water first if it fits within the guidelines set forth by the Illinois Department of Health. If the water does not pass these strict requirements, the company will have to remove the water from the list of products and replace it. Of course, most consumers will never even realize that there was a problem until it affects them. One of the more common illnesses caused by drinking untreated tap water is cancer, one of the leading causes of death in the United States.

Not only is it essential for consumers in Illinois to understand the importance of treating all of their tap water, but they should also be aware of the dangers of doing so. The chemical Chlorine is added to the water supply in Joliet because it is one of the easiest and cheapest ways to disinfect the water. However, there is no evidence linking Chlorine to a decrease in serious illnesses, such as cancer. It is one of the most widely used disinfectants globally, and it continues to be a main ingredient in the treatment process at all types of water plants. It is also used to kill bacteria and viruses that may float around in the water. No one needs to drink chlorine-treated water regularly, as doing so will result in an increased risk of cancer and other illnesses.

In addition to the dangers associated with drinking contaminated tap water in Joliet, Illinois, it is also a good idea for those who use a public water filtration system in their home to make sure that their filter is properly working. Many filtration systems only remove a minimal amount of contaminants, so they will not be able to remove the Chlorine that is in the water. The best type of filter to have is capable of removing all of the chemicals and pollutants from drinking water in the city of Joliet and removing any traces of Chlorine that may still be present. A top-quality water filter can help ensure that you and your family remain healthy, safe, and free of any health risks associated with drinking contaminated water.

Joliet Drinking Water

The City of Joliet is quite concerned about the quality of its drinking water. The City of Joliet was recently rated as one of the nation’s top 10 most dangerous cities for lead poisoning. According to the World Health Organization, lead poisoning can cause brain damage and lower IQ in children. It has been linked to behavioral problems such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults. The state’s attorney general is currently looking into the drinking water issue and is considering legal action against the company that supplied the water to Joliet.

Today, the City of Joliet is taking several steps to clean up the contaminated drinking supply. Currently, they are using solar disinfection, granular carbon, ultraviolet light, and adsorption to clean the water. The Department of Public Health urges everyone to switch to a low-salt filter for their drinking fountains and water heaters. In the last ten years, low-salt filters reduce the amount of lead found in bottled water by as much as ninety-nine percent.

There is no definite timeline for when the clean-up will be completed, but the progress has been steady and is expected to continue. The biggest concern is for children, whose brains are still developing. The only safe drinking water option you have is the filtered water that your public treatment facility provides. You must find out if your treatment facility is using those steps and which units they are using. It is also recommended that you call your doctor and have them do a direct water test with your home’s drinking water. The government does not advise against having this done.

Joliet Water Quality Report

In reviewing the Joliet Illinois water quality report, we found that the most significant finding was a lack of regulated disinfection by the Department of Natural Resources. This means that most of the done treatment is only to remove sediment and other mildly contaminated particles from the treated water and not to destroy disease-causing cysts. They do not have stringent standards to ensure that enough disinfection has been done to meet public safety standards. The lack of regulation is allowing this situation to persist, even though it would be easy to prevent by making sure that the highest standards of treatment are followed at every point along the way, from when the water makes its way into the city’s supply to when it is ultimately distributed to homes. Without these standards, the public is putting its health at risk and that of their families.

Another serious issue with this water quality report is that while it included all of the testing done to date, it did not include any new testing. This is because the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has not yet adopted a national standard for testing. Instead, they have only required that each municipality provide annual reports detailing what bacterial contamination is happening throughout the city and information about any significant changes to the quality of the water supply. Since this information is not provided voluntarily, many municipalities are hesitant to make it available. Unfortunately, not everyone is using the best method for judging the quality of their water supply, and as a result, there is a severe lack of trust in the system.

Because of the lack of recommendations in this Joliet Illinois water quality report, and the years of wasteful consumption that go along with it, many residents have turned to bottled water to conserve both money and the resources required to treat it. While some municipalities, such as South Chicago, have made it mandatory for companies to install proper labeling so that consumers can recognize where their water comes from, many of the bottles being sold today still do not have this information. While this is understandable, it is still a problem. If people do not have easy access to information regarding the water they drink, they cannot effectively decide whether it is better than tap. They know that they need to get the data from at least one source to make an informed decision.

Joliet Water Supply

The City of Joliet, Illinois, has a plentiful water supply. But the problem is that the city does not use the best method for delivering the treated stormwater runoff from roads and other stormwater runoffs to the sewer system, so we see many chemical and biological contaminants in our drinking water. When it rains, we are all concerned about runoff and protecting our environment. But, when we think about it, we should be worried about more than just runoff. We also need to consider the source of the stormwater runoff, which should not come from residential neighborhoods.

The City of Joliet’s water supply falls within the Chicago area Green Belt, but it is isolated from the Chicago sewer system by the limestone hills. For the water to flow into the sewer system, it must go through a series of steps, including the intake of chemicals, the mixing and dispersion of those chemicals, the transportation of those chemicals, and the disposal of the resulting wastewater. In the past, whenever there was heavy rainfall, many of the stormwater runoffs would enter the underground sewage system and contaminate it. Now, the threat is more accurate because of the rapid growth of suburbs. With the addition of more homes being built on what was once rural land, the chances of an uncontrolled release of chemical contaminants into the environment are increased. Add to this the ever-increasing amount of chemical fertilizers and pesticides used on our lawns and gardens, and you can see why there is a great need for a chemical-free water supply.

Without a chemical-free stormwater runoff prevention plan, you have increased chemical contamination in your water supply. You have grown chemical contamination in your soil and your groundwater. You have increased the likelihood of random bacterial contamination of your well and your gardens. The most toxic chemicals that contaminate our air are those that are transported through stormwater runoff. A chemical-free solution is much more desirable than a cheap and effective replacement.

Joliet Water Treatment

The City of Joliet, Illinois, located in the southwestern corner of Illinois, has long prided itself on having some of the cleanest and the best water globally. With a rich natural heritage dating back over a century, the City is home to some of the prettiest and most pristine lakes in all of the Midwest. It has been said that the quality of the City’s drinking supply is as good as any in the world. To be sure that this is true, it is essential to invest in a quality water treatment system for your entire family. This way, you can ensure that your water remains clean and pure for consumption.

Many of the systems used at the City of Joliet are designed to treat the City’s drinking supply and that of the residents. Depending on what contaminants are present, there may need to be more than one treatment system to eliminate the impurities. If you are interested in investing in such a system, you should contact a local distributor that offers clean drinking water for sale. They will be able to help you determine which treatment system will work best for your family. You will want to make sure that you invest in a system that includes a complete reverse osmosis step, which strips harmful pollutants from your water.

While the water quality that enters your home through your drinking water line may be the most important thing, it is not the only thing that needs to be taken into consideration. You may want to install additional filters to eliminate chemicals that have entered the ground through your storm drains or even your ice melt pipes. A quality water treatment system will allow you to enjoy great-tasting water all day long. In addition, you will never have to worry about being plagued by dangerous chemicals or toxins.

Layer 1
Layer 1
Layer 1
×
Layer 1