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Is Hialeah Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 7:48 pm, July 24, 2022
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Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Hialeah?

Yes, Hialeah's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Hialeah has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. To find more recent info we might have, you can check out our boil water notice page or the city's water provider website.

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from April 30, 2019 to June 30, 2022, Hialeah's water utility, City of Hialeah, had 3 non-health-based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. The last violation for Hialeah was resolved on July 31, 2021. This assessment is based on the City of Hialeah water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Water Quality Report for Hialeah Tap Water

The most recent publicly available numbers for measured contaminant levels in Hialeah tap water are in its 2020 Water Quality Report. As you can see, there are levels which the EPA considers to be acceptable, but being below the maximum allowable level doesn’t necessarily mean the water is healthy.

Lead in tap water, for example, is currently allowed at up to 15ppb by the EPA, but it has set the ideal goal for lead at zero. This highlights how meeting EPA standards doesn’t necessarily mean local tap water is healthy.

EPA regulations continue to change as it evaluates the long term impacts of chemicals and updates drinking water acceptable levels. The rules around arsenic, as well as, lead and copper are currently being re-evaluated.

There are also a number of "emerging" contaminants that are not currently. For example, PFAS (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances), for which the EPA has issued a health advisory. PFAS are called "forever chemicals" since they tend not to break down in the environment or the human body and can accumulate over time.

We recommend looking at the contaminants present in Hialeah's water quality reports, or getting your home's tap water tested to see if you should be filtering your water.

Hialeah Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named City of Hialeah for Hialeah in Florida. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

From July 1, 2021 to July 31, 2021, Hialeah had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Routine (RTCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Revised Total Coliform Rule.

From April 1, 2021 to June 30, 2021, Hialeah had 2 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violations with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant codes: Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM.

From Sept. 1, 2015 to Sept. 30, 2015, Hialeah had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring Violation, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Routine (RTCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Revised Total Coliform Rule.

From July 1, 2015 to Sept. 30, 2015, Hialeah had 10 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violations with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant codes: Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM, TTHM, Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM, TTHM, TTHM, TTHM.

From April 1, 2015 to June 30, 2015, Hialeah had 11 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violations with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant codes: Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM, Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM, TTHM, Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM, Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM.

From Jan. 1, 2015 to March 31, 2015, Hialeah had 12 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violations with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) which falls into the Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code group, and the Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule rule code family for the following contaminant codes: TTHM, Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM, TTHM, Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), TTHM, TTHM, TTHM, Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5), Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5).

For the compliance period beginning Jan. 1, 2013, Hialeah had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Follow-up Or Routine LCR Tap M/R which falls into the Chemicals rule code group, and the Lead and Copper Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: Lead and Copper Rule.

Is there Lead in Hialeah Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Hialeah water system, City of Hialeah, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.0026 mg/L of lead in Hialeah water. This is 17.3% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Hialeah contained more lead.

While Hialeah water testing may have found 0.0026 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Hialeah Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be at least one military base - Homestead AFB - near Hialeah with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Hialeah has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

Hialeah SDWA Violation History Table - Prior 10 Years

Compliance Period Status Health-Based? Category Code Code Rule Code Contaminant Code Rule Group Code Rule Family Code
07/01/2021 - 07/31/2021 Resolved No Monitoring Violation (MON) Monitoring, Routine (RTCR) (3A) Revised Total Coliform Rule (111) Revised Total Coliform Rule (8000) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
04/01/2021 - 06/30/2021 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2021 - 06/30/2021 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
09/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring Violation (MON) Monitoring, Routine (RTCR) (3A) Revised Total Coliform Rule (111) Revised Total Coliform Rule (8000) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
07/01/2015 - 09/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
04/01/2015 - 06/30/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) TTHM (2950) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2015 - 03/31/2015 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring and Reporting (DBP) (27) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (2456) Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (200) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (220)
01/01/2013 - Addressed No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Follow-up Or Routine LCR Tap M/R (52) Lead and Copper Rule (350) Lead and Copper Rule (5000) Chemicals (300) Lead and Copper Rule (350)

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
show details
Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
show details
Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
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Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
show details
Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
show details

For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Hialeah Water - Frequently Asked Questions

HOW DO I CONTACT HIALEAH CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Hialeah water provider, City of Hialeah, please use the information below.
By Phone: 305-556-3800
By Mail: 3700 W 4TH AVE
HIALEAH, FL, 33012
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR CITY OF HIALEAH
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their City of Hialeah account to pay their Hialeah water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your City of Hialeah bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Hialeah water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Hialeah water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP HIALEAH WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Hialeah means you will often need to put the water in your name with City of Hialeah. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Hialeah means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with City of Hialeah. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

Is Hialeah Tap Water Safe to Drink? Tap water & safety quality

The estimated price of bottled water

$2 in USD (1.5-liter)

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Hialeah tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 20% Low
  • Water Pollution 25% Low
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 80% Very High
  • Water Quality 75% High

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Hialeah, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Hialeah Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report)

The EPA mandates that towns and cities consistently monitor and test their tap water. They must report their findings in an annual Consumer Confidence Report. Below is the most recent water quality report from Hialeah's Water. If you would like to see the original version of the report, please click here.

KEEP PRIVATE WATER SOURCES SAFE

 

 

 

 

 

 

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JULY 2021

YOUR ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT IS AVAILABE ONLINE

In an effort to be

environmentally responsible,

we are making this report available on the internet.

Log on today to view this report at:

WWW.HIALEAHFL.GOV

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT

THIS REPORT? Please contact the

City of Hialeah, Deptartment

of Public Works

305-556-7383

IT IS A VIOLATION OF FEDERAL

LAWS TO DUMP

TRASH OR INTRUDUCE

POLLUTANTS

INTO THE CITY’S CANALS, LAKES

AND WETLANDS

WATER QUALITY REPORT - 2020

CITY OF HIALEAH - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS

The City of Hialeah’s Department of Public Works is pleased to provide our customers with our annual Water Quality Report. The publishing of this report is required each year by the Safe Drinking Water Act and State of Florida regulations. This report serves as a reference with important information on the quality of the water we deliver. It also provides you with contacts and telephone numbers you may need from time to time.

REQUIRED CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT (CCR)

STATEMENT ADDRESSING LEAD IN DRINKING WATER

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Primarily, lead in drinking water comes from materials and components associated with service lines and residential plumbing. The City of Hialeah Department of Public Works is responsible for pro- viding high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing meth- ods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Lead Hotline at 1-800-424-LEAD [5323] or online at https://www.epa.gov/lead/forms/lead-hotline-national-lead-information-center

SPECIAL NOTE TO AT-RISK POPULATIONS

While the Safe Drinking Water Act is intended to protect all consumers throughout their lifetime, some people may be more susceptible to microbial contaminants than the general population. These “at-risk” populations include persons with a weakened immune system, such as people with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, those who have undergone organ transplants, and in some cases, elderly people and infants. These individuals should seek advice from their health care providers to find out if special precautions should be taken, such as boiling your water. USEPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lower the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also has adopted regulations that establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection to the public. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791, or by visiting the agency’s website at www.epa.gov/safewater.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CONTAMINANTS AND POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECT PLEASE, CALL THE E.P.A. SAFE DRINKING WATER HOTLINE AT 1-800-426-4791

KEEP

YOUR WATER

SAFE

COMUNICATE WITH YOUR WATER UTILITY

Sometimes there are disruptions to the flow of water into your home. These can be planned (for example, your water utility makes repairs to the water system) or unplanned (for example, a water main breaks). Germs may be able to enter the pipes in your home during these disruptions. You can take steps to stay informed about what is happening with your pipes and ensure the water in your home is safe to use:

-Sign up to the City’s Alert Center at https://www.hialeahfl.gov/AlertCenter.aspx?CID=Water-Alerts-4 to receive notifications of advisories (e.g., boil water advisories).

-Follow all recommendations related to water use during an advisory.

-Contact your water utility if you notice a decrease in water pressure throughout your home or you see brown or discolored water.

-After a loss in water pressure, flush water through each faucet and shower in your home until it starts to get hot and runs clear (there is no discoloration). Contact your water utility for additional recommenda- tions.

Homes that use private wells or other private sources of water have different considerations than those served by public utilities. The safety of water in these private sources is the responsibility of the homeowner. Guidance and recommendations to keep well water safe are available from CDC.

(For more information visit: https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/preventing-waterborne-germs-at-home.html)

WATER QUALITY REPORT - JULY 2021

Page 2

CITY OF HIALEAH 2020 WATER QUALITY DATA

PARAMETER

FEDERAL

FEDERAL

STATE

MCL (a)

GOAL (b)

MCL

YEAR

TESTED

MCL MIAMI DADE-WASD VIOL.

Y/N

HIALEAH RO

MCL VIOL. Y/N

HIALEAH

DISTRIBUTION

MCL VIOL. Y/N

MAJOR SOURCES

MICROBIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS

Total Coliform Bacteria (c)

TT 0 TT

2020 (h)

0

N

-

-

0

N

Naturally present in the environment

STAGE 2 DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

Total Trihalomethanes (ppb)

80

N/A

80

2020 (h)

74 (13-84) (d) (e)

N

0.39 (U)

N

38.57 (0 - 19.43) (k)

N

Haloace�c Acids (ppb)

60

N/A

60

2020 (h)

22 (3-20) (d) (e)

N

0.93 (U)

N

42.25 (0-37.04) (k)

N

By-product of drinking water chlorina�on

DISINFECTANTS

Cloramines (ppm) (f)

MRDL=4.0

MRDLG=4

MRDL=4.0

2020 (h)

2.5 (0.1 - 5.0)

N

-

-

N/A

Chlorine (ppm) (f)

MRDL=4.0

MRDLG=4

MRDL=4.0

2020 (h)

N/A

N/A

-

-

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

N/A

N/A

Water addi�ve used to control microbes

 

 

 

 

 

INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

 

 

 

 

 

An�mony (ppb)

6

6

6

2020 (h)

0.1 (0.1)

N

0.09 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Discharge from fire retardants, electronics, solder

 

Arsenic (ppb)

10

0

10

2020 (h)

2 (1 - 2)

N

0.120 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

 

 

Barium (ppm)

2

2

2

2020 (h)

0.006 (0.004 - 0.006)

N

0.00177 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Erosion of natural deposits

Chromium (ppb)

100

100

100

2020 (h)

0.3 (0.1-0.3)

N

3.75 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

 

 

Fluoride (ppm) (i)

4

4

4

2020 (h)

0.8 (0.6-0.8)

N

0.53 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Erosion of natural deposits, water addi�ve which

promotes strong teeth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lead (At the Point of Entry)(ppb)

15

15

15

2020 (h)

 

N

0.31 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Corrosion of household plumbing systems

Nickel (ppb)

-

-

-

2020 (h)

-

N

1.035 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Corrosion of bronze

Nitrate (as N) (ppm)

10

10

10

2020 (h)

0.5 (0.01 - 0.5)

N

0.058 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Erosion of natural deposits, run-off from fer�lizer

Nitrite (as N) (ppm)

1

1

1

2020 (h)

0.06(0.01-0.06)

N

0.0825 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

use

Selenium (ppb)

50

50

50

2020 (h)

0.95 (ND-0.95)

N

0.735 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Erosion of natural deposits

Manganese (ppm)

50

50

50

2020 (h)

10 (0.5-10)

N

0.01 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

 

 

Sodium (ppm)

NE

N/A

160

2020 (h)

41 (24 - 41)

N

48 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Erosion of natural deposits and sea water

Lead (ppb) (f ) (at tap)

AL = 15

0

AL = 15

2020 (h)

3.6, 1 home out of 101

N

-

-

2.6, 0 homes out of

N

Corrosion of household plumbling systems

 

 

 

 

 

(1%) exceeded AL

 

 

 

84 (0%) exceeded AL

 

Copper (ppm) (g) (at tap)

AL = 1.3

1.3

AL = 1.3

2020 (h)

0.06, 0 homes out of 101

N

-

-

0.13, 0 homes out of

N

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(0%) exceeded AL

 

 

 

84 (0%) exceeded AL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

 

 

 

 

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CONTAMINATS

 

 

 

 

 

Dalapon (ppb)

-

-

-

2020 (h)

-

N

0.9 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Run-off of herbicide use

Hexachlorocyclopentadiene (ppb)

-

-

-

2020 (h)

-

N

0.019 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RADIOACTIVE

CONTAMINATS

 

 

 

 

 

Alpha Emi�ers (pCi/L)

15

0

15

2020 (h)

ND

N

1.60 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Erosion of natural deposits

Combined Radium (pCi/L)

5

0

5

2020 (h)

0.4 (ND-0.4)

N

1.15 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

Uranium (μg/L)

30

0

30

2020 (h)

0.1 (ND-1.0)

N

0.10 (U)

N

N/A

N/A

 

 

RADON DATA SUMMARY

RADON (pCi/L)

NE NE NE

2020 (h)

193 (ND-193)

N/A

-

-

N/A

N/A

Naturally occurring in soil and rock forma�ons

WATER QUALITY TERMINOLOGY USED IN THIS REPORT

  1. MCL = Maximum Contaminant level
  2. Federal Goal = MCLG = Maximum Contaminant Level Goal
  3. The MCL for total coliform bacteria states that drinking water must not show the presence of coliform bacteria in >5 % of monthly samples. A minimum of 420 samples for total coliform bacteria tes�ng are collected each month from the main distribu�on system in order to demonstrate complicance with regula�ons.
  4. A total of 32 samples for Total Trihalomethanes and Haloace�c Acids tes�ng are collected per year from the main distribu�on system in order to demostrate compliance with State regula�ons. Compliance is based on a running annual average. This is the value preceding the parentheses.
  5. A total of 16 samples for Total Thrihalomethanes and Haloace�c Acids tes�ng are collected per year from the main distribu�on system to demonstrate compliance with State regula�ons. Compliance is based on a loca�onal running average.
  6. Compliance is based on a running annual average, computed quarterly from montly samples collected during total coliform bacteria tes�ng.
  7. 90th percen�le value reported. If the 90th percen�le value does not exceed the AL (i.e., less than 10% of the homes have levels above the AL), the system is in compliance and is u�lizing the prescribed corrosion control measures.
  8. The data presented for the main system is from the most recent tes�ng conducted for these parameters in accordance with regula�ons.
  9. Fluoride tes�ng to demonstrate compliance with State Regula�ons is required every 3 years in accordance with the State’s monitoring frame work. However, fluoride is added to promote strong teeth.
    1. Acceptance Test-14 days process to verify that the water treatment plant and its parts work according to the contract and that the quality of the water produced complies with the State and the Federal regula�ons.
    2. A total of 36 samples for Total Thrihalomethanes and Haloace�c Acids tes�ng are collected per year from the main distribu�on system to demonstrate compliance with State regula�ons. Compliance is based on the highest loca�onal running annual average. This is the value that precedes the parentheses. The range of results within the parethenses are the minimun and maximun loca�onal quaterly results.
      ( ) = Ranges are given in parentheses where applicable. The value preceding parentheses is the highest detected level reported for the monitoring period except for disinfec�on byproducts and disinfectants, where running annual average is reported.

ABBREVIATION/SYMBOL

DEFINITION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCLG

Maximum

The level of contaminant in drinking water below that there is no

 

Contaminant

 

 

known or expected risk to health.

 

 

Level Goal

 

 

 

 

 

MCL

Maximum

The highest level of contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.

 

 

Contaminant

MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best

 

 

Level

available treatment technology.

 

MRDLG

Maximum

The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no

 

 

Residual

known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the bene-

 

 

Disinfectant

 

 

fits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminats.

 

 

Level Goal

 

MRDL

Maximum

The highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There

 

 

Residual

is convincing evidence that addi�onal or a disifectant is necesary

 

 

Disinfectant

 

 

Level

for control of microbial contamintants.

 

TT

Treatment

A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant

 

Technique

in drinking water.

 

 

 

 

 

AL

Ac�on

The concentra�on of a contaminant, which, if exceeded, triggers

 

 

Level

treatment or other requirements that a water system must

 

 

 

follow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABBREVIATONS AND NOTES

 

 

 

AL = Ac�on Level

 

ppb = Parts per billion or micrograms per liter

 

MRDL = Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level

(µg/L)

 

MRDLG = Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal

 

ppm = Parts per million or milligram per liter

 

N/A = Not Applicable

 

(mg/L)

 

ND = Not Detected

 

 

 

U = Under

 

NE = None Established

 

 

pCi/L = picoCuries per Liter

 

VLN =Viola�on

 

Contaminants


City of Hialeah

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 229900
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Groundwater
  • Total: 14

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Barium
  • Chromium (hexavalent)
  • Radium%2C combined (-226 & -228)
  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Other Detected Contaminants

  • 1%2C4-Dioxane
  • Chlorate
  • Chromium (total)
  • Fluoride
  • Haloacetic acids (HAA5)
  • Molybdenum
  • Selenium
  • Strontium
  • Uranium
  • Vanadium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

Hialeah Tap Water

If you are ever curious about Hialeah Tap Water, it is a local water treatment facility that filters out all of the major contaminants that are present in most tap water. The water is deionized and then filtered, sterilized, and then filtered some more before being sold to customers. That’s how it gets to customers in the form of delicious soft drinks and even ice cream, although most ice cream is made with normal tap water that comes straight from the refrigerator and not this wonderful water. It is an amazing thing how water can taste so good!

People often wonder why this water tastes so great when they have read about all of the chemicals that were used in the treatment plant. Well, as previously mentioned, the water is first filtered through a resin medium that blocks out the majority of these contaminants. After that is done, it goes through a carbon filter that is designed to remove just about everything else that can be found in the water. This includes such things as lead, chlorine, and microorganisms. So much for clean water.

If you want to know if this water is safe to use, you can test it yourself. There are kits available at most hardware stores and even pharmacy stores that will give you results showing what contaminants are present. So, if you are one of those people who care about their health and want to consume only the purest water possible, this is definitely the water to purchase. So, head down to your nearest hardware store or check with your local pharmacy. You are sure to be happy with the quality and the price!

Hialeah Drinking Water

Many people don’t realize that the Hialeah drinking water system is not the way to go. If you are one of the thousands who have called a plumber to come out and take a look at your water line, you may be in for a surprise. The water coming through that tap might be cleaner than you think it is, but the truth is that most of the system is old and outdated. This means that the water treatment facility that is responsible for maintaining the water lines is no longer being updated or replaced, which is why you might see gray water floating around at your kitchen sink. These days, there are much more efficient and affordable ways to get pure, great-tasting water from your tap.

Hialeah is located on Florida’s Gulf Coast, near Naples. Like so many other Florida cities, it was founded around a century ago and has seen quite the rise in population and development in recent years. As a result, many of the older homes have seen better resale values than the new ones, which explains why Hialeah has seen such a huge decline in its real estate values. This bay area was once a thriving community but now is seen as a ghost town due to an influx of retirees and low-income families who have found cheaper housing elsewhere. In addition, the bay has seen less growth in commercial and residential development, which is starting to pinch the residents of Hialeah. Residents are looking for new homes, but the prices are just too high.

If you live in Hialeah, you know that your city water treatment facility does not work very well. You might have seen the gray water settling on your kitchen sink when you took a shower. It tastes like dirt and is even making you smell funny. While this might be disturbing to some, it’s not the biggest problem that Hialeah is facing. The growing numbers of people who are finding out about the harmful nature of Hialeah drinking water are forcing the city to begin installing filter systems in each home that they serve. They hope that eventually, Hialeah will be able to offer clean, fresh drinking water from a local treatment facility.

Hialeah Water Quality

Hialeah Water Quality, like most cities in Florida, is not what it once was. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Department (NFW) has long known that Hialeah is a “no go” area for swimming because of all the pollution. Recently, the entire city was taken off the swimming list due to the “unacceptable” levels of fecal bacteria from stormwater runoff. Now the Miami-Dade County Health Department has reversed their decision and Hialeah is once again a swim-friendly city.

When I live out in Miami, I can’t stand to swim in stormwater because it makes me sick. My family and I take a nightly walk to the Coconut Grove Metro station to use the water fountain in the courtyard outside our apartment building. It was very soothing and refreshing to me to watch the kids when they would run and play on the gently bubbling water. It is sad to think that so many Americans have to put up with poor quality water to use in their homes. But it’s better to fight the battle with education and the citizens of Hialeah are doing just that.

Currently, the health department is requiring all Miami-Dade County school districts to provide bottled water to the students, faculty, and staff. I was glad to know that the Miami-Dade County Schools will be making good on this promise and will install new fountains in our public schools. As Miami-Dade County expands its effort to improve its water quality, the residents of Hialeah will have a much easier time enjoying clean, drinkable water from their taps. I’m happy to know that the health department is finally taking the necessary steps to ensure that Hialeah water meets or exceeds county standards.

Hialeah Water Treatment

Hialeah Water Treatment Plant is considering the largest water treatment facility in Miami-Dade County. The plant processes all of the city’s wastewater, which is sent to a central location for treatment. The majority of Hialeah’s wastewater comes from the heavily populated areas around the city. These areas contain lots of waste materials that are often left behind after commercial or industrial activity has ended. Through the careful process of reverse osmosis and other filtering techniques, this treatment facility ensures that the wastewater is safe and clean enough for human consumption.

For decades, Hialeah has had a standing dispute with the Miami-Dade Public Utilities Commission over how much treatment the water plants require. In 2021, the commission voted 5-3 in favor of setting a limit on how much treatment the water plants need to do. This measure was needed as many cities and counties were struggling to meet the growing need for treatment services. Many believed that Hialeah’s water treatment plant should not have to close down. However, the Miami-Dade Public Utilities Commission failed in its attempt to impose such a heavy restriction, and the water treatment facility was able to continue to operate while the new regulation was in effect.

The Miami-Dade County Public Library has a complete history of Hialeah water treatment, which can be found on the public library website. There is an online version that includes links to additional information about the water treatment plant, including a copy of the county’s permit to operate. Another recent article on the library website points out that this particular water treatment plant is among the oldest in the country. Its origins go back over a century, during the construction of the first Panama Canal.

Hialeah Water Supply

Hialeah Water Supply is just north of Hollywood, just west of South Miami on Florida’s east side. For the most part, this area experiences warmer temperatures during the warmer months and cooler temperatures during the colder months. The water temperature in Hialeah actually falls into the lowest category in Florida that falls between freezing and thawing. This means if you are in the area during any time that the water temperature is below freezing, then you should not be in the water for more than a few minutes because it will begin to warm up.

With an average rainfall of only seven inches over the course of a year, your water supply is in good shape as long as there isn’t much rainfall. If there is a lot of rainfall or if you have heavy rainfall seasons, then your reservoir can run low and you could experience problems with the amount of water that is available. The water supply can also become depleted due to improper irrigation as well as from the evaporation of leaves from trees and plants in the area.

The Hialeah waterfalls are a great way to enjoy the scenery that is in your immediate area and the natural water that flows through Hialeah. The water from the Hialeah waterfalls is treated before it is sent to homes. This means the water will be cleaner and safer for you to use. The treatment removes anything that may be harmful to the water like dirt, plant materials, and other pollutants that can be in the air. There are no harmful chemicals in the water that can harm people or damage the environment.

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