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Is Coral Springs Tap Water Safe to Drink?

Yes! Generally Safe to Drink*

LAST UPDATED: 7:47 pm, July 28, 2022
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Table of Contents

Can You Drink Tap Water in Coral Springs?

Yes, Coral Springs's tap water is generally considered safe to drink as Coral Springs has no active health based violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) that we are aware of. Other factors such as lead piping in a home, or low levels of pollutants on immunocompromised individuals, should also be considered, however. To find more recent info we might have, you can check out our boil water notice page or the city's water provider website.

According the EPA’s ECHO database, from April 30, 2019 to June 30, 2022, Coral Springs's water utility, City of Coral Springs, had 0 violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act. For more details on the violations, please see our violation history section below. The last violation for Coral Springs was resolved on Dec. 31, 2014. This assessment is based on the City of Coral Springs water system, other water systems in the city may have different results.

While tap water that meets the EPA health guidelines generally won’t make you sick to your stomach, it can still contain regulated and unregulated contaminants present in trace amounts that could potentially cause health issues over the long-run. These trace contaminants may also impact immunocompromised and vulnerable individuals.

The EPA is reviewing if it’s current regulations around pollutant levels in tap water are strict enough, and the health dangers posed by unregulated pollutants, like PFAS.

Coral Springs Tap Water Safe Drinking Water Act Violation History - Prior 10 Years

Below is a ten year history of violations for the water system named City of Coral Springs for Coral Springs in Florida. For more details please see the "What do these Violations Mean?" section below.

For the compliance period beginning Jan. 1, 2018, Coral Springs had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Follow-up Or Routine LCR Tap M/R which falls into the Chemicals rule code group, and the Lead and Copper Rule rule code family for the following contaminant code: Lead and Copper Rule.

From Dec. 1, 2014 to Dec. 31, 2014, Coral Springs had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Repeat Major (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

From June 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013, Coral Springs had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Routine Minor (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

From Nov. 1, 2011 to Nov. 30, 2011, Coral Springs had 1 non-health based Safe Drinking Water Act violation with the violation category being Monitoring and Reporting, more specifically, the violation code was Monitoring, Repeat Minor (TCR) which falls into the Microbials rule code group, and the Total Coliform Rules rule code family for the following contaminant code: Coliform (TCR).

Is there Lead in Coral Springs Water?

Based on the EPA’s ECHO Database, 90% of the samples taken from the Coral Springs water system, City of Coral Springs, between sample start date and sample end date, were at or below, 0.0015 mg/L of lead in Coral Springs water. This is 10.0% of the 0.015 mg/L action level. This means 10% of the samples taken from Coral Springs contained more lead.

While Coral Springs water testing may have found 0.0015 mg/L of lead in its water, that does not mean your water source has the same amount. The amount of lead in water in a city can vary greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood, or even building to building. Many buildings, particularly older ones, have lead pipes or service lines which can be a source of contamination. To find out if your home has lead, we recommend getting you water tested.

No amount of lead in water is healthy, only less dangerous. As lead accumulates in our bodies over time, even exposure to relatively small amounts can have negative health effects. For more information, please check out our Lead FAQ page.

Are there PFAS in Coral Springs Tap Water?

Currently, testing tap water for PFAS isn’t mandated on a national level. We do have a list of military bases where there have been suspected or confirmed leaks. There appears to be no military bases near Coral Springs with suspected leaks.

With many potential sources of PFAS in tap water across the US, the best information we currently have about which cities have PFAS in their water is this ewg map, which you can check to see if Coral Springs has been evaluated for yet.

Our stance is better safe than sorry, and that it makes sense to try to purify the tap water just in case.

Coral Springs SDWA Violation History Table - Prior 10 Years

Compliance Period Status Health-Based? Category Code Code Rule Code Contaminant Code Rule Group Code Rule Family Code
01/01/2018 - Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Follow-up Or Routine LCR Tap M/R (52) Lead and Copper Rule (350) Lead and Copper Rule (5000) Chemicals (300) Lead and Copper Rule (350)
12/01/2014 - 12/31/2014 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Repeat Major (TCR) (25) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
06/01/2013 - 06/30/2013 Resolved No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Routine Minor (TCR) (24) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)
11/01/2011 - 11/30/2011 Archived No Monitoring and Reporting (MR) Monitoring, Repeat Minor (TCR) (26) Total Coliform Rule (110) Coliform (TCR) (3100) Microbials (100) Total Coliform Rules (110)

What do these Violations Mean?

Safe Drinking Water Act Violations categories split into two groups, health based, and non-health based. Generally, health based violations are more serious, though non-health based violations can also be cause for concern.

Health Based Violations

  1. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) - maximum allowed contaminant level was exceeded.
  2. Maximum residual disinfectant levels (MRDLs) - maximum allowed disinfectant level was exceeded.
  3. Other violations (Other) - the exact required process to reduce the amounts of contaminants in drinking water was not followed.

Non-Health Based Violations

  1. Monitoring and reporting violations (MR, MON) - failure to conduct the required regular monitoring of drinking water quality, and/or to submit monitoring results on time.
  2. Public notice violations (Other) - failure to immediately alert consumers if there is a serious problem with their drinking water that may pose a risk to public health.
  3. Other violations (Other) - miscellaneous violations, such as failure to issue annual consumer confidence reports or maintain required records.

SDWA Table Key

Field Description
Compliance Period Dates of the compliance period.
Status Current status of the violation.
  • Resolved - The violation has at least one resolving enforcement action. In SDWIS, this indicates that either the system has returned to compliance from the violation, the rule that was violated was no longer applicable, or no further action was needed.
  • Archived - The violation is not Resolved, but is more than five years past its compliance period end date. In keeping with the Enforcement Response Policy, the violation no longer contributes to the public water system's overall compliance status. Unresolved violations are also marked as Archived when a system ceases operations (becomes inactive).
  • Addressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and is addressed by one or more formal enforcement actions.
  • Unaddressed - The violation is not Resolved or Archived, and has not been addressed by formal enforcement.
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Health-Based? Whether the violation is health based.
Category Code
The category of violation that is reported.
  • TT - Treatment Technique Violation
  • MRDL - Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level
  • Other - Other Violation
  • MCL - Maximum Contaminant Level Violation
  • MR - Monitoring and Reporting
  • MON - Monitoring Violation
  • RPT - Reporting Violation
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Code A full description of violation codes can be accessed in the SDWA_REF_CODE_VALUES (CSV) table.
Contaminant Code A code value that represents a contaminant for which a public water system has incurred a violation of a primary drinking water regulation.
Rule Code Code for a National Drinking Water rule.
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rule
  • 121 - Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 122 - Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 123 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Ground Water Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 331 - Nitrates
  • 332 - Arsenic
  • 333 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 111 - Revised Total Coliform Rule
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Rule Group Code Code that uniquely identifies a rule group.
  • 120 - Surface Water Treatment Rules
  • 130 - Filter Backwash Rule
  • 140 - Groundwater Rule
  • 210 - Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 220 - Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 230 - Total Trihalomethanes
  • 310 - Volatile Organic Chemicals
  • 320 - Synthetic Organic Chemicals
  • 330 - Inorganic Chemicals
  • 340 - Radionuclides
  • 350 - Lead and Copper Rule
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
  • 110 - Total Coliform Rules
  • 410 - Public Notice Rule
  • 420 - Consumer Confidence Rule
  • 430 - Miscellaneous
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Rule Family Code Code for rule family.
  • 100 - Microbials
  • 200 - Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule
  • 300 - Chemicals
  • 400 - Other
  • 500 - Not Regulated
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For more clarification please visit the EPA's data dictionary.

Coral Springs Water - Frequently Asked Questions

HOW DO I CONTACT CORAL SPRINGS CUSTOMER SERVICE?
To contact customer service for the Coral Springs water provider, City of Coral Springs, please use the information below.
By Phone: 954-345-2160
By Mail: 9551 W SAMPLE RD
CORAL SPRINGS, FL, 33065
HOW TO PAY BILL FOR CITY OF CORAL SPRINGS
Already have an account?

Existing customers can login to their City of Coral Springs account to pay their Coral Springs water bill by clicking here.

Want to create a new account?

If you want to pay your City of Coral Springs bill online and haven't made an account yet, you can create an account online. Please click here to create your account to pay your Coral Springs water bill.

Want to pay without an account?

If you don't want to make an account, or can't remember your account, you can make a one-time payment towards your Coral Springs water bill without creating an account using a one time payment portal with your account number and credit or debit card. Click here to make a one time payment.

HOW TO START & STOP CORAL SPRINGS WATER SERVICE
Starting Your Service

Moving to a new house or apartment in Coral Springs means you will often need to put the water in your name with City of Coral Springs. In order to put the water in your name, please click the link to the start service form below. Start service requests for water bills typically take two business days.

Start Service Form

Want to create a new account?

Leaving your house or apartment in Coral Springs means you will likely need to take your name off of the water bill with City of Coral Springs. In order to take your name off the water bill, please click the link to the stop service form below. Stop service for water bills requests typically take two business days.

Stop Service Form

Is Coral Springs Tap Water Safe to Drink? Tap water & safety quality

The estimated price of bottled water

$1.64 in USD (1.5-liter)

USER SUBMITTED RATINGS

Coral Springs tap water
  • Drinking Water Pollution and Inaccessibility 50% Moderate
  • Water Pollution 50% Moderate
  • Drinking Water Quality and Accessibility 50% Moderate
  • Water Quality 50% Moderate

The above data is comprised of subjective, user submitted opinions about the water quality and pollution in Coral Springs, measured on a scale from 0% (lowest) to 100% (highest).

Related FAQS

Contaminants


City of Coral Springs

EWG's drinking water quality report shows results of tests conducted by the water utility and provided to the Environmental Working Group by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, as well as information from the U.S. EPA Enforcement and Compliance History database (ECHO). For the latest quarter assessed by the U.S. EPA (January 2019 - March 2019), tap water provided by this water utility was in compliance with federal health-based drinking water standards.

Utility details

  • Serves: 65000
  • Data available: 2012-2017
  • Data Source: Groundwater
  • Total: 15

Contaminants That Exceed Guidelines

  • Arsenic
  • Chlorate
  • Chromium (hexavalent)
  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

Other Detected Contaminants

  • Aluminum
  • Barium
  • Chlorodifluoromethane
  • Chromium (total)
  • Fluoride
  • Haloacetic acids (HAA5)
  • Manganese
  • Molybdenum
  • Nitrate
  • Strontium
  • Vanadium

Reminder

Always take extra precautions, the water may be safe to drink when it leaves the sewage treatment plant but it may pick up pollutants during its way to your tap. We advise that you ask locals or hotel staff about the water quality. Also, note that different cities have different water mineral contents.

Sources and Resources

Coral Springs Tap Water

How can you have clean tap water in Coral Springs, FL? Many people have turned to purification systems to be sure they are drinking pure, healthy water. So how do you know if your water is good enough for consumption? Well, you can always take a water test or two and find out.

Coral Springs is well known for having some of the best water in Florida. The whole city is so lucky to have so much pure water to offer tourists. That being said, not all cities are fortunate enough to be able to do this. Other cities have to rely on outside companies that purify the water for them. In Coral Springs, they have had to turn to the help of an expert for quite some time now.

So how has this done? Well, he or she has devised a water purification system that can take out the harmful bacteria and other contaminants in your water. These microscopic creatures can do severe damage to your body. They can cause sickness, irritability, headaches, and even depression in some cases. Since these contaminants are microscopic, they don’t usually show up on regular visual scales, but you will see the telltale evidence when using a liquid purification system. It’s just a matter of having the right equipment.

Drinking Water in Coral Springs

The importance of drinking water in Coral Springs, Florida, cannot be overstated. This aquifer is under the control of the United States Army Corps of Engineers and is one of the many sources of our drinking water, both municipal and private. This water is pumped in from several different sources, including Lake Lanier, St. Lawrence River, Cane River, and Blackwater Creek. It is distributed to each city and town within Putnam, Hancock, Putnam, and Palm Beach. This is distributed daily to all cities, schools, churches, and even individual homes in the county. The water that makes it to this area comes from a few different places, including the Springs for the City of Coral Springs and the American Civil Power Station.

What you may not realize is that a large portion of this drinking water is treated before it makes it to your faucets; it also undergoes additional filtration after it makes its way to your home. The treatment process includes removing chemicals, bacteria, and other harmful substances that could harm you, your family, or the environment in general. It is important to note that the water from the American Corps of Engineers is considered the purest available anywhere. That is because they operate according to strict guidelines set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency or EPA. This agency was created by the Clean Water Act, and its primary purpose is to protect the water supply from pollution.

Before you plan on investing in any type of drinking water purification system, you should learn as much as you possibly can about them. This way, you will know that you are making the right choice regarding what kind of water you drink, whether municipal or private. You may also want to do some reading about the company you plan to use to provide your water. This can go a long way in protecting the health of you and your family.

Coral Springs Water Quality

Have you ever driven into Coral Springs, Florida, and noticed the poor water quality? The sad thing is that not much has been done to improve upon this sad state of affairs. Most water systems in the county are well above the state minimum standards for water quality, but this is not something that the average person can do. For these companies to continue operating, they have to pay the Florida Corporation Commission to continue to dump untreated wastewater into the ocean. If everyone knew that there was a problem with water quality, they would never allow these kinds of companies to operate.

There have been efforts to improve the water quality in Coral Springs, Florida, by getting the Florida Water and Sewer Commission to install filter stations throughout the city. These filters only work until they get back up to a specific elevation, which is obviously very hard to do. After installing these stations, many people discovered that they still had high levels of toxins in their drinking water. It is essential that these companies clean the water they discharge back out of our aquifers and ocean because this is a public resource, and we all depend on the quality of the water.

There is hope, though, and there have been a few changes made to Coral Springs, Florida, and other Orange County towns experiencing problems with the water quality. First, they started putting bacteria-resistant strains of algae in the water to hopefully avoid being exposed to these toxic chemicals any longer. There is also talk of putting in devices that will prevent people from overfilling their swimming pools. There are no definite solutions yet, but it seems that the residents of these areas may finally get some kind of relief. If you live in a room with contaminated water, you need to learn more about the environment around you and how it is affected. Coral Springs, Florida, may be a victim, but hopefully, we can help others in the same situation.

Water Quality Report in Coral Springs

When looking for a good water quality report in Coral Springs, Florida, the first thing you need to do is to check the level of contaminants and other harmful stuff in the water. There are different testing kits that you can purchase from stores, but ordering online is the most convenient way of doing this. This way, you will be able to get one from the comfort of your home without having to go through any hassle. Also, with the increasing number of websites selling water quality reports, you have the luxury of choosing the one that will give you the best and most accurate assessment.

The water quality report in Coral Springs, Florida, will help you determine if the water in your area meets the standards set by the Florida health department. You do not want to drink water contaminated with heavy metals or bacteria because they are dangerous to your health. Before you spend money on testing kits, you should see if the water quality report has already been done. If it has and then you can choose a filtration system that will work best in your area. If it does not, then there is no need to panic. As long as you buy a good water filter, you will be fine.

Once you have a water quality report in Coral Springs, Florida, you will know that your drinking water is clean, and you will not have to use that water for cooking or for bathing. You will also be able to use tap water to take a bath, and you will not have to worry about the nasty taste. You will be happy to find out that the water in your home is free from heavy metals such as mercury and lead, which can cause health problems. You should take full advantage of the water in your home and have it tested whenever necessary. It is always better to be safe than sorry.

Coral Springs Water Utility

If you’re looking to find a good service in the Palm Beach County area, then the first place to check is Coral Springs, Florida, water utility. This service provider offers both residential and commercial customers top-notch water delivery throughout Palm Beach County. If you’re not familiar with the company, then take the time to visit their website to learn more about what types of services they offer, how long they have been in business, and the contact information for their management team. From there, you can get an idea of whether they will meet your needs and determine if they have what it takes to provide you with the best water service possible.

It may be helpful to also do a bit of research on the Internet to learn more about Coral Springs, Florida water utility, the quality of their water, and overall customer satisfaction. In addition, there are many blogs and articles that you can read to get an inside look at what goes on at this famous company. While reading these helpful documents, take time to learn more about the various water features and aquatic life that inhabit our local waters. You’ll want to make sure that you can take full advantage of any natural waterfalls or creeks that run through your property, but at the same time, don’t be afraid to explore other natural features that might also enhance the beauty of your landscaping. Once you’ve read the many articles and blog posts that you can find online, you’ll have a better understanding of what makes Coral Springs a great community to live in.

One of the things that set Coral Springs apart from other water utility companies is that they fully embrace green technology and practices. There is no doubt that there are plenty of developments on the cutting edge of technology that utility companies have to offer. Still, you’ll also find that many of them utilize green methods as well. For example, many Coral Springs, Florida water utility customers use solar-powered garden water fountains. These fountains not only give the yard a beautiful focal point but also utilize energy that is collected by the solar panels. Not only does this reduce the electricity bill, but it also helps the environment.

Coral Springs Water Filters

Are you interested in finding a reliable company that offers excellent quality Coral Springs Florida water filters? The truth is, you have many options to choose from, and finding the right one can be difficult, especially if you don’t know much about water filters. If you’re like most people who want the purest possible water available, then your first choice should be to find a good, dependable company to install your water filter system. You should do some research to know which companies are the best, but in the end, you need to choose a water filter system that will work right for you and your family.

When choosing Coral Springs, Florida water filters, you need to consider what kind of contaminants you are trying to remove from your water. Depending on your situation, this might be reasonably easy to determine. For instance, if you’re looking for a purifier to remove chlorine, you will need to find Coral Springs, Florida water filters that include a granular carbon filter. There are other filters on the market that include this type of filter, so you’ll have plenty of options to choose from. However, if you only have chloroform and other similar contaminants in your water, then you may not need a filter at all.

Once you know what kinds of contaminants are in your water, then you can move on to narrowing down your choices. The next thing you need to do is find a Coral Springs, Florida water filter system that includes the specific technology to remove each contaminant. For example, you should see a design that offers both an ion exchange and a sub-micron filter. These technologies work together to reduce the number of harmful chemicals and metals that can be found in your water supply, so you’re sure to always have great tasting, refreshing water.

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